I HAVE A DREAM: 50 years ago, today
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  1. #1
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    I HAVE A DREAM: 50 years ago, today

    Here's an excellent video on the 1963 March on Washington.

    http://video.pbs.org/video/2365069476/

    What do the PO regulars think about where we are 50 years later? What has happened to the dream? What has happened to the Black American community? For the better and the worse?

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    Reverse Racism happens daily and it's not acknowledged.... I'm tired of race talk PERIOD. Just spent...

    Where is Obama, Oprah, Jesse Jackson, etc...
    I would love to hear their views on this story. It happens all the time now.

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    There's a commemorative issue of Time magazine that has a pretty nice spread on the progress made/still making/still waiting for black Americans since 1963, but unfortunately it's tucked safely behind their paywall. An interesting poll of your question, with responses segregated by race (pun intended), shows the disparate perceptions of white and black Americans on this topic. Worth checking out.

    It's clear that black Americans in general are better off than they were (it's been ages since we've heard about a lynching party) bearing in mind that "better off" doesn't necessarily equate to "all better now." Hopefully, one of those fellows who rides the sociology range will weigh in on this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Let'sRide View Post
    Here's an excellent video on the 1963 March on Washington.

    http://video.pbs.org/video/2365069476/

    What do the PO regulars think about where we are 50 years later? What has happened to the dream? What has happened to the Black American community? For the better and the worse?
    Not to hijack your tread but do you feel the forum should have a style guide that requires the OP to post their opinions first?
    I am 100% convinced the internet and social media are not the salvation to human civility.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Let'sRide View Post
    Here's an excellent video on the 1963 March on Washington.

    http://video.pbs.org/video/2365069476/

    What do the PO regulars think about where we are 50 years later? What has happened to the dream? What has happened to the Black American community? For the better and the worse?
    unless one of us is African American, I doubt many here have much true insight whatsoever....
    Not banned yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bahueh View Post
    unless one of us is African American, I doubt many here have much true insight whatsoever....
    Really? That's your insight on the impact of MLK's famous speech?

    How sad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Let'sRide View Post
    Really? That's your insight on the impact of MLK's famous speech?

    How sad.
    It is sad when the Democratic Party, the self-proclaimed party of Civil Rights, still focus on the color of one's skin, not their character.

    When someone (ie the GOP) is against Obama's policies, they are demonized as being racist against a BLACK President.....

    MLK Jr's dream is still a dream, and will continue to be a dream.
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    I think this sums up my feelings pretty good,


    The nation has just been through a sensationalized murder trial in Florida, on which many people took fierce positions before a speck of evidence was introduced, basing their opinions on nothing more than judging those involved by the color of their skin.

    We have a long way to go to catch up to what Martin Luther King said 50 years ago. And we are moving in the opposite direction.


    Thomas Sowell

    Thomas Sowell: Fifty years later, regress is obvious - Omaha.com

    I can only hear the stories my mom tells me about Florida in the 40s and 50s. I personally think things are better today. As a side note, my Grandfather, born in small town Florida in 1897, schoolteacher, then lawyer, and just all around great guy, use to say, that if a black man was successful, it was because he had a little white in him. He didn't say it to be mean or racist. But it was a very typical sentiment of the time and place.

    But there is still is a lot to be done. I think a lot of our well-intended social programs have had an unforeseen negative impact. Dependency, a sense of victimization, and the breakdown of the traditional family in many black communities.

    Just my two cents

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    Quote Originally Posted by tednugent View Post
    It is sad when the Democratic Party, the self-proclaimed party of Civil Rights, still focus on the color of one's skin, not their character.
    It's sad that no one cares to discuss this.

    The March on Washington and King's speech were pivotal milestone's in our country's history. They represent a paradigm shift in racial relations.

    Over the last 50 years, African Americans have experience huge gains regarding their rights and overall treatment in society. This doesn't mean they've achieved equality. Only that their situation has greatly improved. MLK's speech help make those gains possible.

    Somewhere along the way, the national conversation on racial relations seems to have lost it's way. Healthy discourse has declined. Race baiting (from both sides) has increased. That's unfortunate.

    Martin Luther King, Jr. was a uniter. Today, we need more uniters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bahueh View Post
    unless one of us is African American, I doubt many here have much true insight whatsoever....
    I'm not African American, but I have some insights.

    Any observer, African American, white or otherwise, would have to say that there has been great improvement in race relations and the conditions of the African American community since 1963. Now, depending upon where one stands, the glass may be 25% full, half-full or almost completely full. Given that I was four years old in 1963, I do not have a good first-hand feel for what race relations were like then. But, by 1967 or 1968, I did and continue to have a feel for the subject. I grew up and continue to live and work in a city, Baltimore, that has a significant African American community. Blacks and whites still live segregated lives in many ways in Baltimore. But, there have been significant strides towards integration and change for the better for the African American community. For example, when I began working in Downtown Baltimore 30 years ago, there were very few African American employees in "white" businesses other than people employed in traditional black jobs (e.g., waitresses, cleaning people). Today, many of the employees in Downtown businesses, including management types, are African American. Many whites fled the City when blacks moved into their neighborhoods and many predicted that there would be a complete exodus when the city became majority black. Today the city is 60-70% black, with a majority of the city council and all city-wide elected officials being black. Yet, many of us white types have stayed in the City. When my partners and I left large firms and started our law firm in 1997 we easily could have set up shop in the suburbs, but we decided to stay in the City. Likewise when I divorced, I moved from the suburbs to the City. Does race still matter? Yes. Does it matter as much as it did in 1963. No.
    I try to be perfectly civil, until someone really pisses me off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Let'sRide View Post
    Really? That's your insight on the impact of MLK's famous speech?

    How sad.
    do you even read what people write here? what's your take on the speech, big guy?
    care to share? or just knock others when they do?
    pathetic.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Let'sRide View Post
    It's sad that no one cares to discuss this.

    The March on Washington and King's speech were pivotal milestone's in our country's history. They represent a paradigm shift in racial relations.

    Over the last 50 years, African Americans have experience huge gains regarding their rights and overall treatment in society. This doesn't mean they've achieved equality. Only that their situation has greatly improved. MLK's speech help make those gains possible.

    Somewhere along the way, the national conversation on racial relations seems to have lost it's way. Healthy discourse has declined. Race baiting (from both sides) has increased. That's unfortunate.

    Martin Luther King, Jr. was a uniter. Today, we need more uniters.
    there you go, was that so hard?

    in my opinion, the speech itself does/did very little. Its what people do with that message that matters.
    If anything race relations in this country have completely stagnated..and in many cases reversed course. the internet is probably a major contributor to all of it...allowing every banal, base thought about the subject to be broadcast infinitum to whomever has a computer....reduced to 144 characters in most cases. the issues are much more complicated than that and take time to discuss, process, and resolve. every race tinged comment is now recorded and broadcast in a matter of minutes...without context often...allowing "small" people to create a national controversy literally in seconds...I've seen two or three example of this this week alone...
    Not banned yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bahueh View Post
    do you even read what people write here? what's your take on the speech, big guy?
    care to share? or just knock others when they do?
    pathetic.
    Wow. Talk about your myopic hypocrisy.

    And in so few words.

    Impressive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkS View Post
    I'm not African American, but I have some insights.

    Any observer, African American, white or otherwise, would have to say that there has been great improvement in race relations and the conditions of the African American community since 1963. Now, depending upon where one stands, the glass may be 25% full, half-full or almost completely full. Given that I was four years old in 1963, I do not have a good first-hand feel for what race relations were like then. But, by 1967 or 1968, I did and continue to have a feel for the subject. I grew up and continue to live and work in a city, Baltimore, that has a significant African American community. Blacks and whites still live segregated lives in many ways in Baltimore. But, there have been significant strides towards integration and change for the better for the African American community. For example, when I began working in Downtown Baltimore 30 years ago, there were very few African American employees in "white" businesses other than people employed in traditional black jobs (e.g., waitresses, cleaning people). Today, many of the employees in Downtown businesses, including management types, are African American. Many whites fled the City when blacks moved into their neighborhoods and many predicted that there would be a complete exodus when the city became majority black. Today the city is 60-70% black, with a majority of the city council and all city-wide elected officials being black. Yet, many of us white types have stayed in the City. When my partners and I left large firms and started our law firm in 1997 we easily could have set up shop in the suburbs, but we decided to stay in the City. Likewise when I divorced, I moved from the suburbs to the City. Does race still matter? Yes. Does it matter as much as it did in 1963. No.
    correct. however, my point was that most of us will never understand the actual systematic and cultural barriers that many African Americans still do today...our viewpoint, our filter will always be that of a culture that created the oppression to begin with. Most of us will always be "looking in". It becomes a pretty one-sided converation very quickly...
    Not banned yet.

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    whatever. not worth it.
    already shared my thoughts with others who aren't so trollish and dismissive.
    Not banned yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkS View Post
    I'm not African American, but I have some insights.

    Excellent post , Mark.

    Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bahueh View Post
    unless one of us is African American, I doubt many here have much true insight whatsoever....
    When Bill O'Reilly gave his criticism and his opinions on how to address the problem, he gets attacked and dismissed by some of the black civil rights experts, because O'Reilly is not black.

    So.. when CNN's Don Lemon agrees with O'Reilly and offers further insight on what needs to be done... the same people attack him in the usual way, they would attack a black republican.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tednugent View Post
    When Bill O'Reilly gave his criticism and his opinions on how to address the problem, he gets attacked and dismissed by some of the black civil rights experts, because O'Reilly is not black.

    So.. when CNN's Don Lemon agrees with O'Reilly and offers further insight on what needs to be done... the same people attack him in the usual way, they would attack a black republican.
    Getting back to the OP, what's your take on how things have changed in the last 50 years?

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    Obama is currently speaking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Let'sRide View Post
    Getting back to the OP, what's your take on how things have changed in the last 50 years?
    while I am a minority, but not black... I am unqualified to speak on this subject.

    However, since I don't care... we have come a long way since MLK Jr's speech. But, we still have a long way before fully realizing his dream, as long as the left continue to divide the nation by skin color, that dream will never come to fruitition.
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    Former President Bill Clinton said Wednesday that Americans should move past “political gridlock” in the spirit of Martin Luther King, Jr.

    “We don’t face beatings, lynchings and shootings for our political beliefs anymore,” Clinton said on the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. “Martin Luther King did not live and die to hear his heirs whine about political gridlock.”

    Clinton suggested that the nation’s political disagreements are small compared to its racial past.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tednugent View Post
    as long as the left continue to divide the nation by skin color, that dream will never come to fruitition.
    good lord...what nonsense.
    Not banned yet.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by tednugent View Post
    , as long as the left continue to divide the nation by skin color,
    Then we will just need to get over this left/right divide! Utopia will then abound.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Let'sRide View Post
    It's sad that no one cares to discuss this.

    The March on Washington and King's speech were pivotal milestone's in our country's history. They represent a paradigm shift in racial relations.

    Over the last 50 years, African Americans have experience huge gains regarding their rights and overall treatment in society. This doesn't mean they've achieved equality. Only that their situation has greatly improved. MLK's speech help make those gains possible.

    Somewhere along the way, the national conversation on racial relations seems to have lost it's way. Healthy discourse has declined. Race baiting (from both sides) has increased. That's unfortunate.

    Martin Luther King, Jr. was a uniter. Today, we need more uniters.
    Why some people wanted to make the legalized murder case of George Zimmerman a racial issue is realty beyond me.

    It was legalized murder --- pure and simple!
    I am 100% convinced the internet and social media are not the salvation to human civility.

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