Is pro cycling a dying sport? - Page 3
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 51 to 66 of 66
  1. #51
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    630
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    It is a grand tour. If all you're interested in is the GC or even action...you're watching the wrong thing. If all you want is action action action, get into track.
    Agreed. The nature of a GT is more of a long, immersive experience as witnessed by the people out with their RV's to watch a few minutes / seconds of the peloton passing (but of course they have had all of the pre-peloton caravan going by first with all of the "goodies"). It isn't wacky races. It is a difficult event to televise with appeal to people who don't have the time, inclination, whatever to watch "nothing" happen for extended periods except seeing great countryside etc. The highlights shows on tv and youtube are useful adjuncts (all, IMHO, of course).

  2. #52
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,930
    Quote Originally Posted by coldash View Post
    Agreed. The nature of a GT is more of a long, immersive experience as witnessed by the people out with their RV's to watch a few minutes / seconds of the peloton passing (but of course they have had all of the pre-peloton caravan going by first with all of the "goodies"). It isn't wacky races. It is a difficult event to televise with appeal to people who don't have the time, inclination, whatever to watch "nothing" happen for extended periods except seeing great countryside etc. The highlights shows on tv and youtube are useful adjuncts (all, IMHO, of course).
    The TdF started as a pretty brutal endurance event\race that more resembled RAAM(Race Across America) than the current TdF.
    Too old to ride plastic

  3. #53
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    630
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    The TdF started as a pretty brutal endurance event\race that more resembled RAAM(Race Across America) than the current TdF.
    True but in the early days there were minutes, hours and even days between competitors. It wasnít a bunch sprint for 1000s of Kms and probably had less ďactionĒ than the recent events

  4. #54
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,930
    Quote Originally Posted by coldash View Post
    True but in the early days there were minutes, hours and even days between competitors. It wasnít a bunch sprint for 1000s of Kms and probably had less ďactionĒ than the recent events
    Right, it wasn't designed as a spectator sport, but one to be read about in the paper, a war of attrition.
    Too old to ride plastic

  5. #55
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    29
    All that may be true, but for example when Contador and Andy Schleck dueled it out in the mountains, the race was on the line, Now the race is decided in the transfer season when the biggest money team compiles it's roster, no hint of competition in the race, The domestiques break down all the other teams and the leader rolls up time on each mountain stage. Just a boring race that has been no fun to watch since Wiggins won it.

  6. #56
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    630
    10 different stage winners in the 10 non TTT stages so far and a great solo win by TdG. IMO, that is not a boring race.

  7. #57
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,241
    I love it. And I buy the commercial free NBC Sports Gold coverage. At 3 billion views it is the third most watched sporting event ever behind the summer Olympics and menís World Cup. People from 90 countries watched... 90. 111,000,000, watched the super bowl. That was BILLION if you missed it. Yes I understand the length of event effect but still... BILLION. The data supports a healthy sport.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  8. #58
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,787
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    I love it. And I buy the commercial free NBC Sports Gold coverage. At 3 billion views it is the third most watched sporting event ever behind the summer Olympics and menís World Cup. People from 90 countries watched... 90. 111,000,000, watched the super bowl. That was BILLION if you missed it. Yes I understand the length of event effect but still... BILLION. The data supports a healthy sport.
    Thereís a big difference between a healthy event and a healthy sport. Folding races and teams, withdrawing financial backers , and fan frustration with television coverage, doping allegations, and format suggest you may not be 100% correct on that. I guess my real question is does pro cycling look the same 10-15 years from now. Do we care?

    https://cyclingtips.com/2018/09/us-r...at-comes-next/

    https://www.outsideonline.com/2235071/death-road-riding
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  9. #59
    Devoid of all flim-flam
    Reputation: Mapei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    7,126
    At least in the US, it's a niche sport. Which is OK. Just let it be what it is. It doesn't hurt that modern media offers niche sports galore. Indulge in the obscure.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  10. #60
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,241
    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Thereís a big difference between a healthy event and a healthy sport. Folding races and teams, withdrawing financial backers , and fan frustration with television coverage, doping allegations, and format suggest you may not be 100% correct on that. I guess my real question is does pro cycling look the same 10-15 years from now. Do we care?

    https://cyclingtips.com/2018/09/us-r...at-comes-next/

    https://www.outsideonline.com/2235071/death-road-riding
    L
    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Thereís a big difference between a healthy event and a healthy sport. Folding races and teams, withdrawing financial backers , and fan frustration with television coverage, doping allegations, and format suggest you may not be 100% correct on that. I guess my real question is does pro cycling look the same 10-15 years from now. Do we care?

    https://cyclingtips.com/2018/09/us-r...at-comes-next/

    https://www.outsideonline.com/2235071/death-road-riding
    You certainly make an important distinction and your point is a good one. The numbers on the other hand are just bits of data according to the BBC so I donít know if itís wrong? I donít see US Postal or 7-11 out there? Mapei? Has cycling ever been Ēstable?Ē Itís like climate, you canít rationally deny climate change but you canít rationally defend climate stability. A sports health has everything to do with elite and amateur sport IMO. The middle figures itself out. If there are lots of amateurs and the top events are healthy you should be OK. That doesnít mean tune ups arenít important or even essential. And maybe amateur cycling is in a tail spin? I donít think so, but Iím no expert. The USA lens is a huge distortion lens. But who cares about the USA lens? It isnít relevant. You see the phenomenon in soccer. Iím simply saying, from what I know of the history, cycling seems to be about the same as ever? But Iím no expert...
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  11. #61
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: BCSaltchucker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,087
    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    At least in the US, it's a niche sport. Which is OK. Just let it be what it is. It doesn't hurt that modern media offers niche sports galore. Indulge in the obscure.
    I can only agree.

    I would enjoy pro cycling just a much if it had 1/10 the money involved and only available by online streaming (uh .. which is how I have to catch my pro race viewing most of the year anyways). I enjoy the pro cyclocross scene in winter, and that has much less than 1/10 the money shoved into it than pro mens road racing.
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  12. #62
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: KoroninK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,219
    Italy doesn't have a WT team and has struggled with their Pro Conti teams and amateur racing. Spain's amateur racing took major hits due to doping scandals and the economic collapse. It's only semi recovered. Many of their races are shorter than in other European countries and for several years now it's become a fact that their riders are developing slower due to these factors. I think looking in these traditional countries for cycling would be more accurate. There are only a handful of U-23 teams in Spain most of which are in the northern part of the country. Valverde's is one of the very few in the southern part of the country.

  13. #63
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: troutmd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    24,779
    Quote Originally Posted by robm90 View Post
    All that may be true, but for example when Contador and Andy Schleck dueled it out in the mountains, the race was on the line, Now the race is decided in the transfer season when the biggest money team compiles it's roster, no hint of competition in the race, The domestiques break down all the other teams and the leader rolls up time on each mountain stage. Just a boring race that has been no fun to watch since Wiggins won it.
    The Fight To Save Professional Cycling From Itself

    The difference between teams forced to scrounge for sponsors and those swimming in cash shows on the race course. Team Ineos (formerly Team Sky when its chief sponsor was Sky UK) has dominated the biggest stage races of the past decade, winning seven of the past eight Tours de France. With a massive $40 million budget, the team simply signs the best riders, puts them to work for one or two leaders and watches the wins roll in. (Team Ineos didnít respond to a request for comment.)

    Less-wealthy stage race rivals rarely bother launching attacks, knowing their riders are usually no match for top contenders (who can rake in more than $4 million a year). As a result, races have become more predictable, causing viewership to decline. NBC attracted between 200,000 and 300,000 daily U.S. viewers of the Tour de France in 2018óapproximately half the audience in 2009. And while the more exciting 2019 race attracted an average of 359,000 viewers, itís worth noting that, by comparison, the average viewership for a National Football League game last year was 15.8 million
    . [Emphasis Added]

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...save-the-sport

    *************************

    Seems the "boring race" syndrome is gaining journalist traction. One super team, i,e, the one with the deepest pockets, takes over as you describe and wins 7 out of the last 8 years. Perhaps that is why you read some many of your forum colleagues say they have dropped the full cable feed, and having a hard time watching anything about the TdF that isn't a 5 minute YouTube summary.
    I am 100% convinced the internet and social media are not the salvation to human civility.

  14. #64
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Wetworks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,127
    Quote Originally Posted by troutmd View Post
    The Fight To Save Professional Cycling From Itself

    The difference between teams forced to scrounge for sponsors and those swimming in cash shows on the race course. Team Ineos (formerly Team Sky when its chief sponsor was Sky UK) has dominated the biggest stage races of the past decade, winning seven of the past eight Tours de France. With a massive $40 million budget, the team simply signs the best riders, puts them to work for one or two leaders and watches the wins roll in. (Team Ineos didnít respond to a request for comment.)

    Less-wealthy stage race rivals rarely bother launching attacks, knowing their riders are usually no match for top contenders (who can rake in more than $4 million a year). As a result, races have become more predictable, causing viewership to decline. NBC attracted between 200,000 and 300,000 daily U.S. viewers of the Tour de France in 2018óapproximately half the audience in 2009. And while the more exciting 2019 race attracted an average of 359,000 viewers, itís worth noting that, by comparison, the average viewership for a National Football League game last year was 15.8 million
    . [Emphasis Added]

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...save-the-sport

    *************************

    Seems the "boring race" syndrome is gaining journalist traction. One super team, i,e, the one with the deepest pockets, takes over as you describe and wins 7 out of the last 8 years. Perhaps that is why you read some many of your forum colleagues say they have dropped the full cable feed, and having a hard time watching anything about the TdF that isn't a 5 minute YouTube summary.
    While I don't disagree with the writer's overall impression as to the why, I have a bit of a problem with their use of US market statistics, particularly when the year chosen for comparison featured a sorta popular guy from Texas. Then to offer up NFL viewrship serves to reinforce that point; Americans want to see Americans.

    Off that point, I think the UCI should consider investing into the NICA/Team USA model on some level for road cycling. They certainly see significant popularity on the MTB scene from the US, I think the same would hold true if they supported road as well. At the very least it would increase interest from US investors and create geographical rivals for Euro teams/riders.

  15. #65
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    630
    Meanwhile back in the real world

    Overall TV-audiences #tdf2019 about 10% up: +20% in Belgium, +15% in France & Italy, +5% in Germany, stable in Sweden, but down in the Netherlands (-7%) & Spain (-11%). Market shares up everywhere except in Spain. #tdf #TourdeFrance #tdf19 #cycling #cyclisme #wielrennen #Paris
    inrng : tour de france shorts

    I guess the Colombian figures will be high as well.

  16. #66
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: troutmd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    24,779
    Quote Originally Posted by coldash View Post
    Meanwhile back in the real world



    inrng : tour de france shorts

    I guess the Colombian figures will be high as well.
    Guess the Spanish people don't care for an English super team with a Latin winner, even though there was no FIFA World Cup this summer, hence the possible reason for inflated numbers.

    Then again people throughout Western Europe were smart to stay out of the record-breaking heat and watch TV during July.
    I am 100% convinced the internet and social media are not the salvation to human civility.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Similar Threads

  1. Soma ES Road Sport vs Gunnar Sport
    By blueutopia in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-25-2011, 05:48 AM
  2. Replies: 19
    Last Post: 12-23-2004, 05:31 PM
  3. kids dying from alcohol poisoning
    By Bocephus Jones in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 10-04-2004, 03:33 PM
  4. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 09-14-2004, 07:07 AM
  5. TdF champions dying young
    By Reynolds531 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 02-18-2004, 11:40 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.