UCI messes with peleton
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  1. #1
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    UCI messes with peleton

    Not sure if this has been posted.

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/road/2009...uigas_helmet09

    Thoughts?

    I think the UCI just likes to mess with the pros. Sucks to be a mechanic right now.

  2. #2
    Back from the dead
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbiker3111
    I think the UCI just likes to mess with the pros. Sucks to be a mechanic right now.
    Sucks to be a mechanic? This is job security for mechanics!

  3. #3
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    The only thing the UCI seems capable of doing is inventing stupid rules to hamper technical progress in bike design and then randomly applying them - typically with a measuring tape in the start house.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevesbike
    The only thing the UCI seems capable of doing is inventing stupid rules to hamper technical progress in bike design and then randomly applying them - typically with a measuring tape in the start house.
    +1

    We all know how a bunch of old-farts who are still trying to ru(i)n our sport like F1. First years and years of childish banter with race organisers and now they're trying to follow F1 by imposing more and more restrictions, except unlike F1 they can only do it in a half-assed manner.

    The problem being that the bicycle industry is not the same as the much larger auto industry. Quite frankly the new restrictions are not going to make TTing anymore interesting. It's just going to cost manufactures a fortune to research, develop, make new moulds etc. Absolutely pointless since most cyclists will never need a TT bike or TT components. I'm pretty sure that if you put all the team leaders on their normal team bikes, then aluminium 105 equipped bikes and timed them on a set course the results are going to be pretty similar.

    Last time I checked in F1 it's the engine that drives the car, not the front wing or spoiler. I'm pretty sure the same goes for cycling.
    Last edited by majura; 02-17-2009 at 09:11 AM.

  5. #5
    jd3
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    It's times like this that the riders and teams need to ban together and stand up to the UCI. I'm not saying that they need to say no to the rule, just when and how it's put in place. I don't know much about this rule so I'll leave that up to others. But to come in in the middle
    of a race and say "you can't use what you've been using", that's ridiculous.

  6. #6
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    Yeah, the UCI is definitely not the FIA, as much as they might wish. Two more differences between TT bikes and F1 cars: TT bikes are mostly stock. Stock handlebars, frames, etc. In F1 you might regulate R&D with new rules, but in cycling you regulate what is actually sold by setting new rules. Also, most TT bikes are sold to triathletes who couldn't give a $h1t what the UCI rules. These rules don't help the sport, they hurt it.

    The racers need a union. Someone should stand up for everyone and say this isn't cool, even if its just a rumor.

  7. #7
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    Just have them all use road bikes for the TTs. Whatever equipment they are using for the other stages, they have to use for the TT.

  8. #8
    Anti-Hero
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    Why don't they just go ahead and say that the same bike (or exact replacement) must be used for all stages?

    Edit... hehehe- SBR beat me to the punch...
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  9. #9
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    because time trial bikes are fun. They are fun to race and fun to work on.

  10. #10
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    Of course they are... but it's hard to find a middle ground with the rules and get all of the officials on the same page w/the interpretations.
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  11. #11
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    Wondering if Cannondale still has those black and white 'Legalize my Cannondale' kits...


    DAN GEROUS

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  12. #12
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    Last time I saw this kind of anger toward a new UCI rule (banning radios) it ended up being a false rumor. Note that this, too, is only a rumor so far.

    I think the riders could benefit from a union as well, but around this? Why would the pros care about UCI rules? To the small degree that it makes any difference to them, it should "level the field."

    Personally, I like the idea that pros race largely on "stock" equipment similar to what we mortals ride. Without UCI limitations I seriously doubt that would be the case.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnStonebarger
    Last time I saw this kind of anger toward a new UCI rule (banning radios) it ended up being a false rumor. Note that this, too, is only a rumor so far.

    I think the riders could benefit from a union as well, but around this? Why would the pros care about UCI rules? To the small degree that it makes any difference to them, it should "level the field."

    Personally, I like the idea that pros race largely on "stock" equipment similar to what we mortals ride. Without UCI limitations I seriously doubt that would be the case.
    They do race 'stock' equipment. You can go out and buy the exact same thing as all but the top 2 guys on any team. If the UCI wants everyone to race non-aero equipment, we might as well give them Merckx-replicas.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbiker3111
    They do race 'stock' equipment. You can go out and buy the exact same thing as all but the top 2 guys on any team.
    That's what I said. And I don't think they'd race the same stuff if it weren't for UCI rules. (Imagine your average bike rider trying the "superman" position.)

  15. #15
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    Post deleted.
    Last edited by JohnStonebarger; 02-17-2009 at 10:13 AM.

  16. #16
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    Well in most cases, the 'stock' bikes are actually illegal by UCI standards, the weight limit today is quite ridiculous and I find it quite amusing that many sunday afternoon riders have bikes lighter than the pros ride.

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnStonebarger
    8 to 2.5 is a slightly lower ratio than 3 to 1, isn't it?
    8/2.5=3.2, so no. Plus the old rule doesn't appear to say that something that maxed out on the 2.5 side has to also match the 8; so you could have something that is 8 by 2(4 to 1)

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by coreyb
    8/2.5=3.2, so no. Plus the old rule doesn't appear to say that something that maxed out on the 2.5 side has to also match the 8; so you could have something that is 8 by 2(4 to 1)
    So this rule applied to aero bars and wheels, etc? Because the UCI hasn't allowed frame tubes with a 4 to 1 ratio for a while, have they?

    Anyway, I can't imagine that the pros give a rat's a$$ about this stuff, so long as the team mechanic keeps them rolling. And I too think it's funny "that many sunday afternoon riders have bikes lighter than the pros ride," but only because I can't imagine why the sunday afternoon riders would pay so much to save a pound or two.

  19. #19
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    Is it too much to ask that a pro team has at least one person that has read the UCI rules? If we don't want to stand in the way of progress, this should be the choice for most TTs
    Blows your hair back.

  20. #20
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    Think of all the advertising space available on those fairings! The sponsors would love it!

  21. #21
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    there's a difference between no rules and a new rule that would in effect make most currently UCI-legal components (and frames) illegal.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevesbike
    there's a difference between no rules and a new rule that would in effect make most currently UCI-legal components (and frames) illegal.
    Recumbents still follow rules.
    Most previously UCI legal components are still legal (and they have been used for several days in Tour of California). This mainly affects time trail bikes. The new rule is apparently not an issue for the team(s) that pay attention.
    Blows your hair back.

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