What kind of cycling fan are you?
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  1. #1
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    What kind of cycling fan are you?

    https://www.cyclist.co.uk/in-depth/6...a-cycling-team

    I think this article attempts to address some interesting questions. Following pro cycling is an interesting fan experience in an of itself. It differs from other sports in a number of ways. Some people are drawn to the sports’ stars, others to the iconic races, and others to riding and racing itself. Do you find yourself supporting a particular team? Individual riders? Your countrymen/countrywomen? Your favorite races? The sport in general? Are you just looking for inspiration to keep you riding?

    What is it that you are drawn to? What keeps you coming back?
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  2. #2
    Devoid of all flim-flam
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    I just enjoy watching them zoom through the countryside, climbing hills, descending like demons, digging deep, forming temporary alliances with the enemy, and dodging dogs & psychotic, attention hungry fans. If a particular rider shows some panache, I start rooting for 'em. If a team plays the game close-to-the-vest, I scoff and boo.
    Last edited by Mapei; 08-02-2019 at 01:03 PM. Reason: grammar
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  3. #3
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    not sure I'd be considered an actual fan of pro racing...all I watch is the TdF. have tried to get into other races, but always end up bailing...

    the TdF is just a fun tradition for me. I record each stage and then watch with a whiskey in one hand while the other one uses the fast forward button. without the dvr, it's completely unwatchable ...

    the natural scenery is interesting, lots of lush, green spaces which is nice to see when it's July in Texas and everything is burnt to a cinder. seeing the architecture is ok, but don't really care about most of the backstories that much. yeah, it's old but I don't need Phil or Bob pontificating at length about its tedious history.

    as far as teams that I like, I tend to base that on the uniforms as much as anything...gotta go with something, and absent a rider I like, that's as good a criteria as any.

    as far as riders go, I tend to root for underdogs, new-comers, and guys that put on gutsy displays of effort and perseverance. thought Sagan was a mouthy twit when he was first showcased, but have changed my mind since he can talk the talk and def back it up.

    wasn't a fan of Froome, but don't really hate on him that hard. I save that for Cavendish...was glad he wasn't in this year's race. guy's a total tool. have rooted for Quintana many times, but he tends to not deliver...his stage win this year was a nice change.

    to be honest, tho I fast forward thru almost every interview with a rider. they rarely say anything other than vague stuff like 'oh uh, we're gonna see what the day brings and adjust accordingly'...zzzzz.

    after watching a stage, I'm almost always motivated to go out and ride. and when the Tour is over, I usually have a day or two re-adjusting to life without it...
    Ancient Astronaut theorists say, 'YES!'

  4. #4
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    Certain races and certain riders. As I started watching the sport in the early 2000's Valverde very quickly became my favorite rider (my first favorite and the only one at the top of that list). So I've followed him throughout his career. However, there are also a few races he rarely or never races that I do follow and enjoy. The classics are my favorite races with Paris-Roubiax being my favorite race. For me I'm drawn to certain races and specific riders. Yes when Valverde retires I likely won't follow the races as closely. However, I'll still be sure to watch the classics.

  5. #5
    Proud luddite
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    I honestly didn’t care much about pro racing and just focused on my own recreational riding...until my wife got into watching the TDF. Then I started to watch with her and it became a rare sport that we could both follow together. We’ll watch an entire TDF stage and talk...about cycling and life in general, and it’s simply a fun thing to do together. Now we watch whatever races we can...the Tour Down Under, the classics, the Tour of California, the TDF, the World Championships, whatever. 🙂

  6. #6
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    For me, my interest in road cycling kind of began with pro cycling. I was looking to get in to triathlon for fitness reasons and out of boredom when I came across the old Garmin Cervelo team videos around 2010-2011. I came across the Paris Roubaix video they had out at the time and fell in love with sport. I never raced one triathlon. I got a bike and have been pretty hooked on road cycling ever since.

    Like KoroninK, the Classics and one day races are special to me. They’re what caught my attention from the beginning and I still dig them the most. I have grown to like climbing more and more over the years, so one day races with one or two fun climbs are becoming my preference over races that just have dust, lots of miles, and cobbles. I really dig Strade Bianche, Flanders, Lombardia, and the Ardennes, etc. Roubaix will always be the one that got me going though.

    Outside of my interest in iconic one day races, I tend to try to support American racers (not a very fruitful enterprise lately), love following a few Classics specialists that inspire me to ride harder (Sagan, Kwiatkowski, and now Alaphilippe, etc.), and watching sprinters that freelance without a sprint train and can climb a bit (Sagan, Viviani, Ewan, and Gaviria, etc). I have also reached a point where I follow teams less and less due to all of the volatility and constant change in pro cycling, but I still have a fondness for EF Pro Cycling, especially since they are my hometown team these days. I tried to support Dimension Data for a couple of years as well, but that got depressing lol.

    I really enjoy hearing what keeps you all watching. Keep ‘em coming!
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post

    Outside of my interest in iconic one day races, I tend to try to support American racers (not a very fruitful enterprise lately), love following a few Classics specialists that inspire me to ride harder (Sagan, Kwiatkowski, and now Alaphilippe, etc.), and watching sprinters that freelance without a sprint train and can climb a bit (Sagan, Viviani, Ewan, and Gaviria, etc). I have also reached a point where I follow teams less and less due to all of the volatility and constant change in pro cycling, but I still have a fondness for EF Pro Cycling, especially since they are my hometown team these days. I tried to support Dimension Data for a couple of years as well, but that got depressing lol.

    I really enjoy hearing what keeps you all watching. Keep ‘em coming!
    There's something about EF that I also cheer for them. Of course they actually go the crowd scouring way to try to save the team it brings another level of interest to them as well. I have my coffee mug to show I'm one of the ones that did send money to try to save the team, which obviously did work. Even that doesn't change the fact that when Valverde retires if a race isn't easily available to find and watch, I won't be looking for it. If what appears to be his final two seasons are like this season I won't be hunting for races to watch him either. Due him having a very poor season i haven't watched many races this year. Come to think of it, Paris-Roubiax is actually the ONLY race I've actually sat down and watched. Have seen parts of a handful of other races, but haven't had enough interest to do anything else.
    Last edited by KoroninK; 08-03-2019 at 03:38 PM.

  8. #8
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    I always try to catch the mountain stages of the TdF. I know the top riders and teams, but that means about 80% of the competitors are unknown to me. Still, the sheer audacity of the TdF in particular appeals to me, the mountain stages in particular, since it's there that all the predictions change. As an auto racing enthusiast, the downhill parts more resemble car racing, and the spectacular helicopter shots of the alpine stages are worth watching just on their own.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

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