Power Based Training without a Power Meter?
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  1. #1
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    Power Based Training without a Power Meter?

    So I am on the rollers the other day, doing my 2x20s, but my HR wasn't cooperating. It was a bit hard to get it up into the zone, but it might just be that I need a new battery in the chest strap(numbers jumping around a bit). I know from prior tests that my LTHR is 171, and the last few times I rode the rollers, that corresponded to 26 mph on the computer. So, instead of using the erratic HR numbers, I just maintained my LT power (speed) at 26 mph.

    Is there anything wrong with doing my next field test using the rollers, and speed? My LT Power would just be my average speed, corresponding to some unknown power, right? I realize that tire pressure would need to be the same, and my weight.

    This would mainly be for threshold training, as I'm not certain how to calculate the speed for the other zones. Anyone?

  2. #2
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    There is nothing wrong with using speed as a measurement when doing intervals of any length, especially while on a trainer or rollers.

    I trained all winter like that last year. I had a HRM, but wanted more consistent data so I put a computer on my bike and use the speeds to see both improvement and baseline data throughout the winter. I had no real idea of how much power I was actually putting out since at the time I didn't have a power meter.

    In many ways this is better than using HR for intervals because now that I have a power meter I can see how much HR can vary. I have done back to back workouts (one day followed by the next) that were the same. I carried the same speed and power during the workout but my average HR was 10 BPM slower the second day. So had I relied solely on the HRM my zones would have been way off and I wouldn't have got as good of a workout just going off of HR.

    Basically....just make sure all other things are equal and it works just fine.
    Snakebit: "How many times do I have to tell you that I don't have a source? I don't make a note of everything I see or hear on the internet and you don't have to take my word for it."

  3. #3
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    Thanks - that's what I figured. It's much easier too, since I don't have to take the time to put on the HR strap and dump water on myself under the sensors to get it working until I start sweating.

    I want a power tap sometime down the road, but this will fill the gap on threshold intervals for a while.

  4. #4
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    http://www.kurtkinetic.com/powercurve.php
    I believe these are numbers for a kurt kinetic road machine. I do an FTP test then form training zones off of the result. May not be the most accurate but it seems to work very well. Just make sure you be as consistant as possible with tire pressure, pressure of resistance unit against tire, temperature (not sure if fluid temperature would effect resistance with the KK, a warm-up before testing and training would probably take care of any potential consistancy issues), etc...

    17mph=183.33w
    17.1mph=185.53w
    17.2mph=187.74w
    17.3mph=189.98w
    17.4mph=192.23w
    17.5mph=194.51w
    17.6mph=196.80w
    17.7mph=199.12w
    17.8mph=201.46w
    17.9mph=203.81w
    18mph=206.19w
    18.1mph=208.59w
    18.2mph=211.01w
    18.3mph=213.45w
    18.4mph=215.91w
    18.5mph=218.39w
    18.6mph=220.89w
    18.7mph=223.42w
    18.8mph=225.96w
    18.9mph=228.53w
    19mph=231.12w
    19.1mph=233.73w
    19.2mph=236.36w
    19.3mph=239.02w
    19.4mph=241.70w
    19.5mph=244.40w
    19.6mph=247.12w
    19.7mph=249.86w
    19.8mph=252.63w
    19.9mph=255.42w
    20mph=258.24w
    20.1mph=261.07w
    20.2mph=263.93w
    20.3mph=266.81w
    20.4mph=269.72w
    20.5mph=272.65w
    20.6mph=275.60w
    20.7mph=278.58w
    20.8mph=281.58w
    20.9mph=284.60w
    21mph=287.65w
    21.1mph=290.72w
    21.2mph=293.82w
    21.3mph=296.94w
    21.4mph=300.09w
    21.5mph=303.26w
    21.6mph=306.45w
    21.7mph=309.67w
    21.8mph=312.92w
    21.9mph=316.19w
    22mph=319.48w
    22.1mph=322.80w
    22.2mph=326.15w
    22.3mph=329.52w
    22.4mph=332.92w
    22.5mph=336.34w
    22.6mph=339.79w
    22.7mph=343.26w
    22.8mph=346.76w
    22.9mph=350.29w
    23mph=353.84w
    23.1mph=357.42w
    23.2mph=361.03w
    23.3mph=364.66w
    23.4mph=368.32w
    23.5mph=372.01w
    23.6mph=375.72w
    23.7mph=379.46w
    23.8mph=383.23w
    23.9mph=387.03w
    24mph=390.85w
    24.1mph=394.70w
    24.2mph=398.58w
    24.3mph=402.48w
    24.4mph=406.42w
    24.5mph=410.38w
    24.6mph=414.37w
    24.7mph=418.39w
    24.8mph=422.44w
    24.9mph=426.51w
    25mph=430.62w
    25.1mph=434.75w
    25.2mph=438.91w
    25.3mph=443.10w
    25.4mph=447.32w
    25.5mph=451.57w
    25.6mph=455.85w
    25.7mph=460.16w
    25.8mph=464.49w
    25.9mph=468.86w
    26mph=473.26w
    26.1mph=477.68w
    26.2mph=482.14w
    26.3mph=486.63w
    26.4mph=491.14w
    26.5mph=495.69w
    26.6mph=500.27w
    26.7mph=504.88w
    26.8mph=509.52w
    26.9mph=514.19w
    27mph=518.89w

  5. #5
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    I have a Cyclops fluid trainer, how would I calibrate it to relate to "outside" speeds?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert M.
    I have a Cyclops fluid trainer, how would I calibrate it to relate to "outside" speeds?
    If what you want to know is the speed, attach a bike computer with a rear wheel pickup and set the computer for whatever the circumference of the rear wheel is.
    I like cats, I just can't finish a whole one by myself.

  7. #7
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    If what you want to know is the speed, attach a bike computer with a rear wheel pickup and set the computer for whatever the circumference of the rear wheel is.
    Yeah, I've got that part. What I'm asking I guess is what is the proper resistance setting on the trainer to simulate true road resistance.

  8. #8
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    Can you calibrate the Cyclops Fluid? Isn't it designed to have a true road-like feel already?

    btw, that is an interesting chart...

  9. #9
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    Can you calibrate the Cyclops Fluid? Isn't it designed to have a true road-like feel already?
    I went to Saris website and it states that once the roller is in contact with the tire to turn the resistance knob 2.5 turns.

    That chart is interesting, I'm just trying to recreate it on my trainer.

  10. #10
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    I take that to mean the resistance between the tire and the roller (to avoid slippage) not to increase road like resistance, but I may be wrong?

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