Breakaway Road - Page 3
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 51 to 72 of 72

Thread: Breakaway Road

  1. #51
    Cathedral City, CA
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    903
    • It looks like the new covers have nylon on the outside. Is that correct? Is there rubber on the inside?
    • I see the chain is exposed. I didn't like that and is why I had a 10sp Wippermann chain with Connex and now a Chorus 11sp chain with a KMC Missing Link. That way it was easy to remove the chain and pack it in its own bag.
    • Is the rear derailleur still connected to the cable?
    2016 Ritchey BreakAway (carbon)
    Full Campagnolo drivetrain - Chorus 11sp (50, 34 & 12-29)
    Zonda wheels
    Lezyne Super GPS w/Cateye speed/cadence & HR sensors
    Ritchey fork, stem, headset, bars and seatpost
    Fizik Arione VSX saddle
    Cinelli bar tape

    BeBop Pedals

  2. #52
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nhluhr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    902
    Yes, rear derailleur is connected to chain and cable but there is a ton of slack, having detached it from the cable stops. I lashed the R.Der to the chainstay so it won't bang around.

    The covers do indeed have nylon backing. The inside is a velcro-friendly "loop" surface so the little "hook" tabs on the outside edge of each pad can fasten in place however you want them. You get two long ones and 7 short ones to cover all the frame parts.

  3. #53
    Cathedral City, CA
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    903
    Quote Originally Posted by nhluhr View Post
    Yes, rear derailleur is connected to chain and cable but there is a ton of slack, having detached it from the cable stops. I lashed the R.Der to the chainstay so it won't bang around.
    Actually I don't tie the rear derailleur down. The plastic foam that I wrap it in is thick enough that it wedges in wherever I put it.

    Quote Originally Posted by nhluhr View Post
    The covers do indeed have nylon backing. The inside is a velcro-friendly "loop" surface so the little "hook" tabs on the outside edge of each pad can fasten in place however you want them. You get two long ones and 7 short ones to cover all the frame parts.
    That's different. In 2005 they used split neoprene tubes and beaded cable ties. Not nearly as sophisticated as what you have.

    Also, it appears that you don't use the pad (I'm assuming it is still part of the packing materials), or at least I can't see it.
    2016 Ritchey BreakAway (carbon)
    Full Campagnolo drivetrain - Chorus 11sp (50, 34 & 12-29)
    Zonda wheels
    Lezyne Super GPS w/Cateye speed/cadence & HR sensors
    Ritchey fork, stem, headset, bars and seatpost
    Fizik Arione VSX saddle
    Cinelli bar tape

    BeBop Pedals

  4. #54
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nhluhr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    902
    It does come with the chainring elastic strap, nylon crank bag, a full-size nylon pad thingy meant to separate wheels from frame (I didn't use it since I packed diferently) and finally a smaller nylon pad with two holes designed to separate/locate the two wheels against each other (also not used).

  5. #55
    Cathedral City, CA
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    903
    It's the same then, excluding the difference in tube covers...
    2016 Ritchey BreakAway (carbon)
    Full Campagnolo drivetrain - Chorus 11sp (50, 34 & 12-29)
    Zonda wheels
    Lezyne Super GPS w/Cateye speed/cadence & HR sensors
    Ritchey fork, stem, headset, bars and seatpost
    Fizik Arione VSX saddle
    Cinelli bar tape

    BeBop Pedals

  6. #56
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 55x11's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    3,065
    It works either way - S&S or Ritchey way.
    I lately prefer Ritchey way for some reason. Perhaps because it leaves more room for other stuff in the corners somehow for bulky items (clothes, tools etc.), with two wheels next to each other.

    Here's step-by-step of how packing looks if you use Ritchey way: Oleg's Cycling Adventures - Suitcase of courage
    Here's how it looks if you use S&S style: Oleg's Cycling Adventures - Packing Ritchey Breakaway S&S style

    You are not the first person to comment on how difficult it is to pack everything Ritchey style. My first time it took me a few tries to figure it out. But now I cannot remember why it was so difficult - it seems pretty natural and quick - two wheels, two triangles and then put bars in.

  7. #57
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nhluhr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    902
    Back from my business trip, the Ritchey Breakaway traveled and performed beautifully. Check-in at SEA Delta counter went easily. The check-in agent did ask me to drop it at the oversized luggage window (but didn't insinuate or charge me for being oversize), rather saying it was just a bit tall to go through their conveyor belt system. No problems. A plane change at ATL and landing at IAD by 5pm, I got to the hotel and had the bike assembled by around 7:30pm. It DID have a TSA inspection sheet inside but nothing was messed up. Next day, I loaded it along with some clothes into my rental car and went to my corporate office for a day full of meetings in the board room. By 5pm, I was itching to ride so I hauled ass out to Front Royal and started riding from the north entrance of Skyline Drive. The NPS Ranger at the gate suggested I was nuts for riding up into low cloud cover and rain. *****, please. I'm from Seattle. That weather describes my entire fall-winter-spring riding season. I ended up getting about 5000ft of elevation in 38miles. Very cold by the end but survivable.

    I repeated the whole thing the next day but kept it to 20miles since it was raining much harder.

    Wednesday, I hooked up with a longtime friend and we rode 44mi on the W&OD trail, chattering away the whole time.

    I packed it up Thursday night after a company dinner in DC, then flew out with it Friday. This time the check-in agent didn't even blink an eye. I guess IAD has bigger conveyor belts than SEA. For both halves of the trip, I was able to use Delta's android app to track my baggage as it was loaded into the plane and made the connections in ATL. Nice for peace of mind.

    Unpacked it again Saturday and rode it the past two days, about 250TSS per day. This bike rocks.

  8. #58
    Cathedral City, CA
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    903
    Quote Originally Posted by nhluhr View Post
    This bike rocks.
    This sounds like a surprise?
    2016 Ritchey BreakAway (carbon)
    Full Campagnolo drivetrain - Chorus 11sp (50, 34 & 12-29)
    Zonda wheels
    Lezyne Super GPS w/Cateye speed/cadence & HR sensors
    Ritchey fork, stem, headset, bars and seatpost
    Fizik Arione VSX saddle
    Cinelli bar tape

    BeBop Pedals

  9. #59
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nhluhr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    902
    Quote Originally Posted by flatlander_48 View Post
    This sounds like a surprise?
    Actually, it is. I was convinced I needed to spend nearly $3000 on a S&S coupled CoMotion frame + case + accessories to get what I wanted. I didn't.

  10. #60
    Ritchey Design Rep
    Reputation: Ritchey_Dave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    640
    Glad you're having fun with it. Love hearing stories where we can help change an otherwise normal business trip into a business/bike trip!
    Dave Law
    Ritchey Design Representative

  11. #61
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nhluhr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    902
    Quote Originally Posted by Ritchey_Dave View Post
    Glad you're having fun with it. Love hearing stories where we can help change an otherwise normal business trip into a business/bike trip!
    Tell me about it! Prior to this, I'd basically book-end my business trips with super-epic days, then try to get whatever I could out of the crappy hotel stationary bike if they even had one. Life changing is a way I'd describe my Breakaway.

  12. #62
    Cathedral City, CA
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    903
    As was mentioned earlier, it's great that the bike serves a number of different purposes but all based on being able to take your bike with you when traveling.
    2016 Ritchey BreakAway (carbon)
    Full Campagnolo drivetrain - Chorus 11sp (50, 34 & 12-29)
    Zonda wheels
    Lezyne Super GPS w/Cateye speed/cadence & HR sensors
    Ritchey fork, stem, headset, bars and seatpost
    Fizik Arione VSX saddle
    Cinelli bar tape

    BeBop Pedals

  13. #63
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nhluhr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    902
    I took my BreakAway to Maui last month:

    Ready to ride, starting from 0ft elevation:


    Heading all the way up there:


    32 miles, 10,023ft, and 4.5 hours later:


    and an hour after that:


    It's hard to describe riding up Haleakala. Although in the second photo you can see it looks relatively flat, it just starts at about 5% and stays that way forever. The average for the next 32 miles is 5.3% with a couple pitches at 15% or more, including the last 100ft to the summit parking lot which really knocks the wind out of you, as you have excitedly expended the last of your energy in a fit of adrenalin passing the visitor center 200ft below. There aren't many places to refuel along the way - the last water stop is around 7000ft so you have to have two full bottles from there and make the final 3000 on your own. The last place to get food of any kind is the Lavender Farm Cafe at around 4500ft or so, where you can get some jam-on-bread and some no-bake cookie balls. I've done long climbs before, around 4000ft start to finish, but nothing really prepares you for the endless climbing of Haleakala. I was really happy to have a power meter and able to watch my power to make sure I didn't overexert early in the ride - the tendency to blast away from Paia is there but I kept it reigned in and had decent power all the way to the top. Descending was better than I thought - I feared it would be a festival of braking hard steep corners and worrying about overheating pads or blowing a tire but in fact it never came to that - the turns were much faster on my bike than in the car the morning prior (drove up for sunrise the day before this) so I didn't really have to use them all that hard. As I descended out of the cool air of high altitude into the muggy death-heat of a slightly unseasonably warm day in Paia, I was suddenly stricken by how strange I felt to be carrying the windtex jacket I had been wearing only an hour before. You might think that riding up such a long climb with a relatively constant gradient for most of the way would be tedious and miserable but on the contrary - With the fitness not really a concern after a very solid winter/spring training and racing base with some big climbs leading up to this for warm-ups, I was left only with the enjoyment of the various environments I was about to pedal through. Down low with the hot windy cane fields, in the middle where it was like a rainforest with huge JurassicPark style plants, followed shortly after by the foggy/cloudy grazing lands where it looked like I'd imagine the scottish high country would look, and the startlingly strong smell of a pine forest above 6000ft, then the dry scrub brush finally giving way to volcanic rubble and silversword plants. Truly amazing variety all the way.

    Epic day.

    I also rode my Ritchey along the road north of Napili Bay, which is an endless undulation of steep climbs, steep descents, and switchbacks with no flat road whatsoever. Also, thanks to its low speed limit and nearly impassable roadsections past Kahakuloa, it was blissfully free of the heavy/fast traffic you find south of Napili and the south side of the island traveling between the various resort attractions. It mostly looked like this:


    Last week, I put 200 more commuter miles on the Ritchey and I finally had a cable-coupler failure. The cut end of the cable pulled out of the coupler just as I was pulling into my steep driveway. I trimmed about a 1/4" off it and reattached it but I'm concerned about this happening during a less convenient time. I guess part of the regular maintenance on the bike should be checking the couplers to make sure the fixing bolts are full-tight.
    Last edited by nhluhr; 07-16-2013 at 07:52 AM.

  14. #64
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    16
    Very cool. Thanks for sharing.

  15. #65
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: burgrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,842
    Quote Originally Posted by nhluhr View Post
    I guess part of the regular maintenance on the bike should be checking the couplers to make sure the fixing bolts are full-tight.
    I like that the rear brake coupler has double bolts to help prevent a brake failure, whereas the derailleur ones only need one. Good design with safety in mind.

    Thanks for posting your travels. Very impressive ride. I drove up there last year on vacation (didn't have my bike) and that is a massive, endless climb. Unfortunately it was cloudy and rainy up top so visibility was only a couple hundred feet and damn cold.

  16. #66
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nhluhr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    902
    Had to spend a few days in El Segundo so I took my breakaway and rode around Palos Verdes. What a terrific place to ride!!

    The terrain is beautiful, the pavement is mostly immaculate, and the drivers are, curiously, the best I've seen anywhere. Makes Seattle feel like a warzone! Tip of the hat to you, Los Angeles area riders.


  17. #67
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    4,092
    I like the paint scheme on your Ritchey; the non-parallel ends on the white panels and the tie-in with the small panels on the top tub and the fork. I'd never seen that before. It's not too much and finishes off the frame nicely. I wished the new Ritchey Road Logic 2.0 had as much effort put into its finish as your frame.

  18. #68
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    16
    Very nice. I agree. I miss riding there. I used to have business trips to LA arriving Thursday night and leaving Sunday night. I could fit three rides in, one each morning. It was especially enjoyable riding in the winter months when it was 20 degrees back east.

  19. #69
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nhluhr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    902
    I'm getting ready to move across country in a couple weeks so during Thanksgiving I took my Ritchey Breakaway with me to the new place and left it with a nearby relative.

    I miss my Ritchey!!!

  20. #70
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    604
    Quote Originally Posted by nhluhr View Post
    nhluhr - could you please tell me what the saddle height is in this photo? I'm looking at a BreakAway but I don't generally like the look of sloped frames, however yours looks great. I need a 820mm seat height.

  21. #71
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nhluhr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    902
    Quote Originally Posted by Lab Worker View Post
    nhluhr - could you please tell me what the saddle height is in this photo? I'm looking at a BreakAway but I don't generally like the look of sloped frames, however yours looks great. I need a 820mm seat height.
    From top of pedal to top of saddle, pedal at the bottom of stroke, it is 975mm. It's a 175 crank. If you need center of crank to top of saddle, more like 805. Ritchey is a size 60.

  22. #72
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    604
    Quote Originally Posted by nhluhr View Post
    From top of pedal to top of saddle, pedal at the bottom of stroke, it is 975mm. It's a 175 crank. If you need center of crank to top of saddle, more like 805. Ritchey is a size 60.
    Thank you!

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.