Scott CR1 or Pinarello 3:13?
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  1. #1

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    Scott CR1 or Pinarello 3:13?

    I am an amature triathlete, riding about 100 Km/week... Now trying to choose between Scott CR1 and Pinarello 3:13. I can get them at a similar price level and with same group (Campy Veloce). Any insights / recommendations will help...
    Taking into account the excellent reviews for the CR1, still one point that concerns me is the (presumed) "fragility" of the frame - I understand it should not be carried in a rear car carier, and that it is sensitive to crashes/hits... Moreover, there is the story with the rear deraileur, which is integral to the frame and if it breaks the entire frame needs replacement - is that the case?
    Thanks!
    Eli.

  2. #2
    What? Me worry?
    Reputation: StillRiding's Avatar
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    There's no reason why a Scott CR1 would be any more or less fragile than a Pinarello 3:13. No bike should be carried in a rear car carrier, and any bike can be damaged in a crash. If you're a triathlete and only riding 100 km/week, then a crash is very unlikely.

    The acutal probability of breaking a rear derailleur hangar (assuming you pay some attention to maintenance and adjustement) is also very, very small, right up there with getting struck by lightning while riding. But, in case you do, there are plenty of shops that specialize in carbon frame repair, and any of them can replace rear dropouts for a charge that shouldn't be much more than $75 plus any shipping required.

    The choice between Scott and Pinarello should come down to which ever one suits you best. Ride them both. Pick the one you like. These are both pretty expensive bikes for the kind of riding you intend.

  3. #3
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    Can you enlighten me why no bikes should be carried in a rear car carrier?

    Are you just talking about possible damage from someone rear ending you, or is there structural reasons that bike frames should not be carried like this?
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    Last edited by Kestreljr; 03-10-2011 at 10:35 PM.

  4. #4
    What? Me worry?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kestreljr
    Can you enlighten me why no bikes should be carried in a rear car carrier?

    Are you just talking about possible damage from someone rear ending you, or is there structural reasons that bike frames should not be carried like this?
    Any time a bike is carried outside a vehicle, it's susceptible to theft. When it's carried on a rear carrier it's also susceptible to damage from other vehicles and to dirt, debris and oil thrown up from the road and from your car. Rear carriers for more than one bike also have a reputation for scratching up bikes.

    If you have to carry outside your car, rooftop is best, but watch for low garages.

    The best way to carry an expensive bike is in your vehicle. With a mid-sized wagon or SUV and the right racks, it's possible to carry two, three or even four bikes with only the front wheels removed.

  5. #5
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    Thanks "stillriding" I thought that there might be more too it than that.

    Now, when I am forced to carry bikes on the roof (because space is needed inside), I lock them with an 8 foot motorcycle lock & chain when stopped (it has a plastic shrink wrap around it to that does a good job of protecting the bike frames). I don't know if you have ever seen one of these things, but it would be easier to rip off the roof of a car then cut through one of these things. they are about $350 for a good one, but IMO a very nice tool to have that you can lock all kinds of things down.

    Oh, and go with the Scott CR1 and never look back...
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    Last edited by Kestreljr; 03-10-2011 at 10:36 PM.

  6. #6
    What? Me worry?
    Reputation: StillRiding's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kestreljr
    Now, when I am forced to carry bikes on the roof (because space is needed inside), I lock them with an 8 foot motorcycle lock & chain when stopped (it has a plastic shrink wrap around it to that does a good job of protecting the bike frames).
    A chain is better than nothing, but if the bikes are out of your sight for more than just a few minutes, you're taking a risk. Unless the chain runs in and around every component, thieves can make off with expensive wheels, saddles, brakes, shifters, etc. Further, unless the chain goes inside the car, thieves can steal the whole assembly, bikes, bike rack and chain. Actually, thieves can break windows and steal bikes out of cars too (happened to me), so there's no 100% safe answer except to keep an eye on your bike all the time.

  7. #7
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    umm... I deterred from saying this earlier, but Stillriding, you are "Captain Obvious". No joke people can steal your bike parts, hell, screw stealing the bike, SOMEBODY CAN STEAL YOUR CAR. And then they can beat you up. And they can use a whip, stick, small can, car battery, or a finger nail clipper to beat you up with.

    Your post are not that insightful. Thanks though! ;)

  8. #8
    What? Me worry?
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    kestreljr.

    Did you intend to come across as a child with bad manners or was it accidental?

  9. #9
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    I carry bikes on the roof, or inside ... depending on space. The roof is good, but driving in the rain at 70mph with bikes on the roof, is the same as taking them to a jetwash ... not very good for bearings etc.

    I thought the F3 frame was heavier than the Scott, and also uses a lower modulus carbon (although which carbons are actually used is so hyped by marketing, that I don't know if you can compare them). Heavier + lower modulus should equal tougher ... but then if the pinarello was assembled on a monday, and Mr Wong was hungover from drinking Tsing Dao's the night before, then the Scott will be better ... unless Mr Lee from the Scott factory was there too ....

    The only way to work out which one will be stronger, would be to get a statistically significant sample of each, and break them ... normally 30 of each will work for this ...

    Maybe check the warranties of each ... and if you're worried, get insurance that covers crashes.

  10. #10
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    I've carried my bikes on a rear rack for 3 decades (including my current CR1 for 3 years). If you cram too many bikes on it, they will get scratched up--and any bike sitting outside in bad weather will need to be cared for. Aside from those issues, I don't see any real 'problem' with using a rear rack for any bike. They work great.

    I've never used a roof rack on my own cars, because they are a hassle to lift bikes on (especially hefty long-travel mountain bikes) and I'm pretty sure I'd end up taking them off with the garage or other low clearance obstacles.

    I love my Scott, and would recommend them to anyone shopping for a mid-range carbon road bike. I'd certainly pick it over a low-end Pinerello.

  11. #11

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    I just got a 2007 CR1 Team this week. I have to say, I love it. Great bike. Really responsive, comfortable and stiff. So fun to ride.

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