Scott CR1 Team Issue safe in trainer?
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16

    Scott CR1 Team Issue safe in trainer?

    Is a lightweight frame like this safe to use on a trainer (Minoura 850 for example)?

  2. #2

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    531
    I dont know. Lets not ride it on the road.

  3. #3
    classiquesklassieker
    Reputation: orange_julius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    3,106
    Sorry if this is stupid, but why the particular concern with using the bike, or any bike, on a trainer?

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16
    I've noticed that some of my other bikes (all mountain bikes) have varying amounts of flex on the trainer. These bikes are all aluminum frames. One, a hardtail, is rock solid, but the others, full suspension, have a considerable amount of side to side flex.

    I'm considering building a light carbon frame road bike that I would use on the same trainer during the winter months. I am wondering if a light carbon frame will flex even more and if using it on a trainer will decrease its life expectency.

  5. #5
    classiquesklassieker
    Reputation: orange_julius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    3,106
    It seems to me that if you were rightfully concerned about your force breaking the bike while it is mounted on a trainer, then the bike shouldn't be ridden on the road. You're not applying any more force than you would when you are riding the bike, it's just more visible. Plus, hitting bumps and potholes apply quite a lot of force on your bike.

    My 34 cents.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16
    A bike isn't held in a fixed position by the axle when riding on the road. In the trainer, the bike has to be stressed more laterally.

  7. #7
    classiquesklassieker
    Reputation: orange_julius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    3,106
    But the source of the force (you) is not fixed by the same axle. Hence my previous comment.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16
    I don't see your point. If I am out of the saddle in the trainer I guarantee the stresses at the rear dropout and bottom bracket are higher than at anytime on the road. My question if whether or not they are high enough to be a concern.

  9. #9

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    531

    Rest assured buddy.

    " One, a hardtail, is rock solid, but the others, full suspension, have a considerable amount of side to side flex."

    If the bike is secured on the trainer, it will not be possible for it to sway from side to side since the trainer is acting as a wider base at the rear wheel. For it to flex sideways, you have to bend the axle. I think you have mistaken the vertical flex as horizontal flex.

    If you go out of saddle, pump out certain amount of force and the frame does not break, it will not break no matter how long you keep pedalling constantly. Carbon fiber does not fatigue under load: either it holds up, or it bends and breaks immediately.

    On the road, the bike swings from side to side to counterbalance your legs' pumping motion, therefore the "swaying", and you can stay in a relatively unchanged position to your bike. On a trainer, the bike is fixed, so you will move horizontally and vertically to counterbalance the motion instead. I dont have a good calculation on this, but there should not be significant difference in stress levels on both your legs and your frame. If it does, either your legs or the frame will break.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16
    For the bike to flex sideways the axle does not have to move at all. I'm talking about frame flex laterally. Put your bike in a trainer, get on the bike, and lean over to the side. The frame will be stressed and will flex. Try this on the road and you fall over... no stress on the frame (until it hits the ground).

    Seemed like such a simple question.

  11. #11

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    531
    Quote Originally Posted by B R H
    For the bike to flex sideways the axle does not have to move at all. I'm talking about frame flex laterally. Put your bike in a trainer, get on the bike, and lean over to the side. The frame will be stressed and will flex. Try this on the road and you fall over... no stress on the frame (until it hits the ground).

    Seemed like such a simple question.
    The other intesting point to note is, your pedalling motion is up-down cycle, not sideways. Frame "flexes" because the pedals are offset from the center and there is a torque acting on the BB shell area, but NOT the entire frame. I highly doubt there is that much perceptible flex in the BB area, given the CR1 is a rigid frame, and the moment arm is too short to be effective in bending the frame. Your scenario of leaning the bike to the side does not happen in real life. The bike swings side to side during out-of-saddle effort, as I have said, is just the bike trying to counteract your pedalling motion so that you stay in a constant location relative to the bike (conservation of momentum). On a trainer, it is just vice versa. You go up and down rather than the bike swing sideways, as long as you pedal in a correct way. If one produce a significant lateral flex in the entire frame, there is a problem going on.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16
    I wasn't so much concerned with frame flex in the tubes, but rather near the dropouts and joints where things are bonded. I agree that with smooth pedaling action, it really shouldn't be an issue, but I do get a little crazy on the trainer sometimes especially when doing intervals to failure. The trainer moves around leaving black marks all over the floor. I know these stresses are higher than the bike will see otherwise. Perhaps I do need to worry more about my technique rather than the bike though! I suppose if it were an issue someone would have chimed in with an example or picture of a failure by now.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    99
    Quote Originally Posted by B R H
    Is a lightweight frame like this safe to use on a trainer (Minoura 850 for example)?
    see newsgroup rec.bicycles.tech for discussion on this.
    For example see: Google search

    Even if there wouldn't be any examples of frame failures why you would want to use your "good" bike for trainer use (except for warming up at races etc.)? Buy beater bike for trainer and set it up similarly to your main bike.
    Last edited by mark_m; 09-10-2004 at 03:39 AM.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16
    Thanks! You know I just never seem to be able to type in the right combination of words to get many hits on searches.

    Good bike vs. beater bike. That's another reason I was asking. I'd rather not have additional bikes to maintain and find room for. It's trainer-worthiness is part of the purchase decision I'm making right now.

  15. #15
    CHT
    CHT is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: CHT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    394
    Why debate it, just ask Scott directly. It's their warranty, so you'll know if it'll be honored. Everyone's posts here (myself included) are only speculation. In the unlikely event you crack your frame, it's all about the warranty here. Scott either builds or designed the frame, so they'll either stand behind it for this use or not.

    p.s. Nice frame. Saw one at a local century. Very beefy tubes (I have a LOOK 381 which looked painfully thin in comparison).
    Last edited by CHT; 09-10-2004 at 10:52 AM.
    It's better to burn out, then to fade away....

  16. #16

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    60
    FWIW B R H, I agree, I dont think the force distribution can be the same locked in the trainer as on the road. Contacting Scott is probably the most secure decision you can make...and I put my Al frame in my trainer just to avoid any issue that might ever happen with my carbon.

    topcarb

  17. #17

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    50

    I know what you mean...

    Quote Originally Posted by B R H
    For the bike to flex sideways the axle does not have to move at all. I'm talking about frame flex laterally. Put your bike in a trainer, get on the bike, and lean over to the side. The frame will be stressed and will flex. Try this on the road and you fall over... no stress on the frame (until it hits the ground).

    Seemed like such a simple question.


    And you are right about the flex. I don´t have exactly a super light frame but a nice Trek 5500 that I have ridden in my trainer for the last couple of years and I have noticed the lateral flex you talk about, it sort of tweaks the bike from the droputs. I freaked out at first but kinda got used to it later on. Since I am no engineer i can´t tell if carbon fatigues or not but my bike is still holding on pretty well so far. Of course I can´t comment about the Scott frame but thought you may want to hear from other carbon frames used on indoor trainers, I am sure asking Scott directly can give you the piece of mind you need.

    Hope I have helped.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-11-2005, 08:15 PM
  2. MY test ride on a Scott CR1 team issue
    By crossracer in forum Scott
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-12-2004, 10:47 AM
  3. Please explain new ttt rule
    By Carleton in forum Pro Cycling - Tour de France
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 07-07-2004, 07:48 AM
  4. CR1 Team Issue
    By cycling6500 in forum Other Builders
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-25-2004, 11:54 AM
  5. CR1 Team Issue integration completed
    By cycling6500 in forum Other Builders
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-22-2004, 12:32 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.