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  1. #26
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    Warning: Speedster Porn

    I had promised to post some pics of the Speedster in its current state...

    1.) Is the Speedster as I ride it, minus a bottle or two. Yeah, the seat bag is huge, but I'm a pack-rat, what can I say?
    2.) Is a good close-up of the form of the top and down tubes. I don't know if the insets increase rigidity as SCOTT claims, but I do love the detail. It sets it apart from the typical round or oval tubes.
    3.) A shot of the new SRAM cranks they installed as a result of Bike Seige 2009. I believe they are S550s. Is that an "upgrade" over the Truvativ elita?
    4.) Longer shot of the drivetrain. 105 front and rear derailleur.
    5.) Newb question: what is the little nub on the right seat-stay for? It's only on the right side.
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    Last edited by Opus51569; 09-07-2009 at 09:57 AM.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

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    Warning: Porn Continues

    Some other shots...

    6.) An arial shot of the flat top tube. The VP Bear Trap platform pedals and the toes of my Tevas, 'cause that's how I roll.
    7.) I got the 56cm L frame and I'm glad I did. Even though I'm 5'9", I'm also a Clydesdale and I think the 54cm would have felt too small. By the by, those RACE 28 stickers on the wheels are the only thing that I don't like about the bike, aesthetically. The red just doesn't go with everything else. I plan to remove them at some point.
    8.) Front-on view of the 105 brifters and bars. I like the white bar tape. We'll see how much I like it when it gets a bit greasier and I try to clean it.
    9.) Reverse view. I like the placement of the cable adjusters just off the brifters.
    10.) One last pic along the opposite side.

    So, there's my Speedster.
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    Last edited by Opus51569; 09-07-2009 at 10:09 AM.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  3. #28
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    Nice bike! Ride safe and ride often!

    To answer your questions, IMO almost any crankset would be an upgrade over FSA's lower end (and some higher end) stuff. But on a (slightly) more objective note, the SRAM weighs less and costs about $50 more, so it's GOT to be better, right??

    The little nub on the right seat stay is a chain hanger, for... well... hanging your chain when you need to remove the wheel. It helps to keep the chain from dropping and used to be on just about all bikes up to around the 90's. I guess they went by the wayside when all this less (weight) is more philosophy came into being. Nice touch, IMHO.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352
    Nice bike! Ride safe and ride often!

    To answer your questions, IMO almost any crankset would be an upgrade over FSA's lower end (and some higher end) stuff. But on a (slightly) more objective note, the SRAM weighs less and costs about $50 more, so it's GOT to be better, right??

    The little nub on the right seat stay is a chain hanger, for... well... hanging your chain when you need to remove the wheel. It helps to keep the chain from dropping and used to be on just about all bikes up to around the 90's. I guess they went by the wayside when all this less (weight) is more philosophy came into being. Nice touch, IMHO.
    Excellent. The nub certainly had me curious. I thought it might be for a tap or computer of some kind, but couldn't figure out why it would be in that position. A chain hanger makes sense. Thanks, as always, for the knowledge.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  5. #30
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    Clydesdales and potholes don't mix...

    Went for an afternoon ride before the Labor Day weekend got away. I was exploring some MUTs I hadn't been on before. Just under 40 miles round trip. Beautiful day, busy trails and a nice scenic ride.

    On the return, I came around a corner and hit a pothole in the trail. It was more like a sinkhole, actually, where the pavement itself sunk into the hole, making it almost invisible until it was too late. BAM! (front wheel), BAM! (rear wheel). I literally yelled "S#!t" as I hit it (much to the dismay of the lady coming in the opposite direction with her child in tow).

    I heard a loud "pop" as I hit the hole and my first thought, after the expletive, was "here we go again, back to the LBS". The sound was so loud, I was sure that I had broken something: fork, stay, a spoke at the very least. I pulled off the trail to inspect the damage. No visible problems. No cracks anywhere. The spokes were fine and the wheels still spun true.

    I got back on the bike and continued on... gingerly. Running over the usual bumps in the road, however, it sounded like there was a bit of a rattle coming from the headset, but, admittedly, I was pretty paranoid at that point listening for any little noise that might indicate trouble. The steering was fine, though, and I pressed on.

    At home, I did a more thorough inspection. Still no visible signs of trauma. I took the allen wrenches to it and discovered that the headset was more loose than it should be. I snugged it down and that seems to have fixed the rattle at least for now.

    I'm going to keep the next few rides slow and close to home, though, just in case. In the meantime, I'm going to post in the Wrenching forum to see if the impact could have loosened the headset bolt or if its indicative of a larger problem.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569
    Went for an afternoon ride before the Labor Day weekend got away. I was exploring some MUTs I hadn't been on before. Just under 40 miles round trip. Beautiful day, busy trails and a nice scenic ride.

    On the return, I came around a corner and hit a pothole in the trail. It was more like a sinkhole, actually, where the pavement itself sunk into the hole, making it almost invisible until it was too late. BAM! (front wheel), BAM! (rear wheel). I literally yelled "S#!t" as I hit it (much to the dismay of the lady coming in the opposite direction with her child in tow).

    I heard a loud "pop" as I hit the hole and my first thought, after the expletive, was "here we go again, back to the LBS". The sound was so loud, I was sure that I had broken something: fork, stay, a spoke at the very least. I pulled off the trail to inspect the damage. No visible problems. No cracks anywhere. The spokes were fine and the wheels still spun true.

    I got back on the bike and continued on... gingerly. Running over the usual bumps in the road, however, it sounded like there was a bit of a rattle coming from the headset, but, admittedly, I was pretty paranoid at that point listening for any little noise that might indicate trouble. The steering was fine, though, and I pressed on.

    At home, I did a more thorough inspection. Still no visible signs of trauma. I took the allen wrenches to it and discovered that the headset was more loose than it should be. I snugged it down and that seems to have fixed the rattle at least for now.

    I'm going to keep the next few rides slow and close to home, though, just in case. In the meantime, I'm going to post in the Wrenching forum to see if the impact could have loosened the headset bolt or if its indicative of a larger problem.
    I suspect what happened was that the impact jarred the fork enough to shift the stem slightly higher on the steerer which, in turn, pushed the top cap (and probably the compression plug or star nut, depending) up slightly, causing the play. There's a possibility that the stem wasn't sufficiently tightened (which may have prevented this), but that's conjecture. I say this because the top cap could literally be removed without affecting the bearing adjustment as long as the stem is sufficiently tightened, preventing any slippage.

  7. #32
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    Glad to hear your up and running... I have been following your post from the start. Nice pic's, I like the white and gray combo... mine's Gray and black.

    I was wondering about the little nub too... thanks PJ
    "I refuse to be afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday & I love today!!"

    "There are only two ways to establish competitive advantage: do things better than others or do them differently."

    "Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there."

    2010 Orbea Onix w/Ultegra R8000
    2009 SCOTT Speedster w/Ultegra 6800
    2007 IRONHORSE HT

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352
    I suspect what happened was that the impact jarred the fork enough to shift the stem slightly higher on the steerer which, in turn, pushed the top cap (and probably the compression plug or star nut, depending) up slightly, causing the play. There's a possibility that the stem wasn't sufficiently tightened (which may have prevented this), but that's conjecture. I say this because the top cap could literally be removed without affecting the bearing adjustment as long as the stem is sufficiently tightened, preventing any slippage.
    wim echoed this sentiment in the Wrenching forum. FBinNY is concerned that it could signal a problem at the junction of the steerer tube and the crown. I have disassembled and adjusted what I could and everything once again feels fine. If the rain holds off, I'll take it for a good spin this weekend to get a better idea of what shape it's in.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROAD&DIRT
    Glad to hear your up and running... I have been following your post from the start. Nice pic's, I like the white and gray combo... mine's Gray and black.

    I was wondering about the little nub too... thanks PJ
    Thanks. My Trek is black and, to be honest, I never would have considered a white bike before, but that combo really appealed to me. I find I spend more time wiping it down after a ride because everything shows on it, but I don't mind too much

    Do you have pics posted of your Gray and Black? If so, feel free to toss them up here.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569
    wim echoed this sentiment in the Wrenching forum. FBinNY is concerned that it could signal a problem at the junction of the steerer tube and the crown. I have disassembled and adjusted what I could and everything once again feels fine. If the rain holds off, I'll take it for a good spin this weekend to get a better idea of what shape it's in.
    Yes, I've followed that thread as well. I'm a little surprised that no one mentioned the stem bolts, but it might fall under the realm of 'too obvious to see'.

    I also saw your last post asking about any remaining issues without disassembling the fork completely. I think you're fine, because if the race wasn't seated properly or there were any remaining issues with alignment of parts, you wouldn't be able to adjust the headset correctly. You'd go from looseness in one fork position to binding in another. If it moves freely without play or binding, you're good!

  11. #36
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    I took the bike for a nice 40 mile ride this morning on a combination of MUT and local roads. This was the first ride since the pothole/headset incident and I'm pleased to report that all seems to be well. No more play in the headset. The bike handled well and there are no more extraneous noises. In hindsight, I'm guessing the pothole amplified an already slightly loose headset. Yet another reason why I'm seriously considering forgoing the free tune-up offered by the LBS rather than letting them do anything to the bike again.

    The only mechanical issue on today's ride was a significant squeal when I engage the front brakes. I think the issue is partly due to the brake pads still breaking-in and partly due to my inability to read and follow directions. I won't go into all the details here as I have posted about this elsewhere already. Suffice it to say that I finally got around to removing the Alex Rims RACE 28 stickers from all over the rims and GooGone and tire rubber do not mix I think my attempt to clean up the mess may have left some residue on the front rim which contributed to today's brake squeal. Once I got home, I checked the pads and cleaned the braking surface of the rim thoroughly. We'll see if that took care of the problem.

    A note about the compact crank. With my initial rides on the bike, I have to admit I was starting to doubt my decision to go with the compact crank over the triple. The previous problems I encountered with dropping the chain off the 34 didn't help matters much. With the F/D adjusted and almost 200 miles on the Speedster now, I think I am getting used to the change in shift patterns and the bike itself is starting to break in a bit more. The combination made for a very smooth ride today. I rarely found myself in the wrong gear and shifts are getting crisper and cleaner.

    In my earlier reviews I had mentioned the difference in the relative stiffness of the bike over the Trek Pilot I also ride. I find now that I get out of the saddle more with the Speedster and have an easier time holding a decent speed/tempo or, when the legs feel good, even accelerating up short climbs. I know this is as much psychological as physiological, but I "feel" faster on the bike which, in turn, makes me want to ride faster.

    As far as comfort goes, I am starting to think that either a high-rise or even an adjustable stem might be in my future. On my last two rides I've encountered a bit of numbness particularly in my right hand. I think my reach on the bike is just a little too long (I catch myself with my elbows locked out) and my weight pitched a bit too far forward. I would try adjusting the saddle, but it is already as far forward as it will go and as low as I can comfortably make it. If anything, the saddle should probably be slid back and raised a few centimeters to put me in a better pedaling position. Therefore, I would like to try moving the bars up and slightly back, instead, to see if this helps. The stock stem is, I believe, 0 degree and 110mm. An angled (17 - 40 degrees) and slightly shorter (90 or 100mm) stem should make a big difference.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569
    Thanks. My Trek is black and, to be honest, I never would have considered a white bike before, but that combo really appealed to me. I find I spend more time wiping it down after a ride because everything shows on it, but I don't mind too much

    Do you have pics posted of your Gray and Black? If so, feel free to toss them up here.

    I do have some pics on the computer at home, will dig them up and post.... How do the wheel looks with out the stickers? I was thinking of doing the same but was worry about the residue (glue) that would be left behind and it collecting road dirt when riding
    "I refuse to be afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday & I love today!!"

    "There are only two ways to establish competitive advantage: do things better than others or do them differently."

    "Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there."

    2010 Orbea Onix w/Ultegra R8000
    2009 SCOTT Speedster w/Ultegra 6800
    2007 IRONHORSE HT

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROAD&DIRT
    I do have some pics on the computer at home, will dig them up and post.... How do the wheel looks with out the stickers? I was thinking of doing the same but was worry about the residue (glue) that would be left behind and it collecting road dirt when riding
    The sticker story is a long one. The short version is that the stickers peeled off easily. There was some residue but after misusing GooGone, I ended up using WD-40 and it removed the residue just fine. No more stickiness, no dirt either.

    As for the new look, I like it. The old stickers were a bit much and the red really didn't match anything else on the bike. Without the stickers, the rims do look pretty nondescript, but I think that just accentuates the frame more. Down the road, when it's time for a tire change, I think I might look in to a set of silver or gray striped tires in keeping with the overall theme.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569
    I took the bike for a nice 40 mile ride this morning on a combination of MUT and local roads. This was the first ride since the pothole/headset incident and I'm pleased to report that all seems to be well. No more play in the headset. The bike handled well and there are no more extraneous noises. In hindsight, I'm guessing the pothole amplified an already slightly loose headset. Yet another reason why I'm seriously considering forgoing the free tune-up offered by the LBS rather than letting them do anything to the bike again.

    The only mechanical issue on today's ride was a significant squeal when I engage the front brakes. I think the issue is partly due to the brake pads still breaking-in and partly due to my inability to read and follow directions. I won't go into all the details here as I have posted about this elsewhere already. Suffice it to say that I finally got around to removing the Alex Rims RACE 28 stickers from all over the rims and GooGone and tire rubber do not mix I think my attempt to clean up the mess may have left some residue on the front rim which contributed to today's brake squeal. Once I got home, I checked the pads and cleaned the braking surface of the rim thoroughly. We'll see if that took care of the problem.

    A note about the compact crank. With my initial rides on the bike, I have to admit I was starting to doubt my decision to go with the compact crank over the triple. The previous problems I encountered with dropping the chain off the 34 didn't help matters much. With the F/D adjusted and almost 200 miles on the Speedster now, I think I am getting used to the change in shift patterns and the bike itself is starting to break in a bit more. The combination made for a very smooth ride today. I rarely found myself in the wrong gear and shifts are getting crisper and cleaner.

    In my earlier reviews I had mentioned the difference in the relative stiffness of the bike over the Trek Pilot I also ride. I find now that I get out of the saddle more with the Speedster and have an easier time holding a decent speed/tempo or, when the legs feel good, even accelerating up short climbs. I know this is as much psychological as physiological, but I "feel" faster on the bike which, in turn, makes me want to ride faster.

    As far as comfort goes, I am starting to think that either a high-rise or even an adjustable stem might be in my future. On my last two rides I've encountered a bit of numbness particularly in my right hand. I think my reach on the bike is just a little too long (I catch myself with my elbows locked out) and my weight pitched a bit too far forward. I would try adjusting the saddle, but it is already as far forward as it will go and as low as I can comfortably make it. If anything, the saddle should probably be slid back and raised a few centimeters to put me in a better pedaling position. Therefore, I would like to try moving the bars up and slightly back, instead, to see if this helps. The stock stem is, I believe, 0 degree and 110mm. An angled (17 - 40 degrees) and slightly shorter (90 or 100mm) stem should make a big difference.
    A couple of thoughts re: brake squeal and fit issues.

    I've found that denatured alcohol and a rag or paper towels works very well on the rims and pads. If the pads glaze over (most do) remove them and either sand them or (my preference) use a flat metal file 'sanding' in an up/ down motion. Clean with the alcohol after sanding. Also, to minimize brake squeal, toe in the front of the pads slightly. You want the front of the pad to contact the rim before the middle and rear.

    Fit issues:
    I'm not sure if you mentioned being fitted to your bike at the LBS. I know you don't hold them in very high regard, but I was just curious. With the info you've posted, it's hard to pinpoint the causes, but I suspect there are a combination of things causing you problems with fit (thus my question).

    Hand numbness, as you might guess, can be caused by excessive pressure on your arms and hands. The remedies would include changing hand position periodically to relieve pressure, and also readjusting the saddle. You mentioned that it was all the way forward, which generally speaking isn't right and this adjustment shouldn't be used to correct for reach issues - stem length and angle will do that.

    If you haven't done so already, I would readjust the saddle to a KOPS (knee over pedal spindle) position, but before doing so, check you saddle height, measuring from center of BB to top of saddle (along the seat tube), noting that number . Along with the KOPS adjustment, either level the saddle or tip the front up slightly. Once these two adjustments are made, recheck saddle height.

    Once saddle adjustments are made you can better assess your reach on the bike. If you are getting neck/ shoulder/ back pain, your reach and/ or bar height may need adjusting. This is a good reference:
    http://www.jimlangley.net/crank/bikefit.html

    Last, but not least, it may just be that what appear to be fit issues really are nothing more than your first 40 mile ride on a new bike, but still, your saddle position just doesn't seem right.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352
    A couple of thoughts re: brake squeal and fit issues.

    I've found that denatured alcohol and a rag or paper towels works very well on the rims and pads. If the pads glaze over (most do) remove them and either sand them or (my preference) use a flat metal file 'sanding' in an up/ down motion. Clean with the alcohol after sanding. Also, to minimize brake squeal, toe in the front of the pads slightly. You want the front of the pad to contact the rim before the middle and rear.

    Fit issues:
    I'm not sure if you mentioned being fitted to your bike at the LBS. I know you don't hold them in very high regard, but I was just curious. With the info you've posted, it's hard to pinpoint the causes, but I suspect there are a combination of things causing you problems with fit (thus my question).

    Hand numbness, as you might guess, can be caused by excessive pressure on your arms and hands. The remedies would include changing hand position periodically to relieve pressure, and also readjusting the saddle. You mentioned that it was all the way forward, which generally speaking isn't right and this adjustment shouldn't be used to correct for reach issues - stem length and angle will do that.

    If you haven't done so already, I would readjust the saddle to a KOPS (knee over pedal spindle) position, but before doing so, check you saddle height, measuring from center of BB to top of saddle (along the seat tube), noting that number . Along with the KOPS adjustment, either level the saddle or tip the front up slightly. Once these two adjustments are made, recheck saddle height.

    Once saddle adjustments are made you can better assess your reach on the bike. If you are getting neck/ shoulder/ back pain, your reach and/ or bar height may need adjusting. This is a good reference:
    http://www.jimlangley.net/crank/bikefit.html

    Last, but not least, it may just be that what appear to be fit issues really are nothing more than your first 40 mile ride on a new bike, but still, your saddle position just doesn't seem right.
    If cleaning the rims didn't solve the squeal issue, sanding and alcohol on the pads was going to be my next step.

    As for the saddle, no, the LBS didn't offer a fitting when I purchased the bike. That probably should have been my first clue.

    I have tried shifting hand positions as often as possible, but I find once the hand goes numb initially, shifting positions only provides relief for a few minutes before the numbness creeps back again.

    I know that part of the problem, also, is that I am a Clydesdale and am, thus, putting even more overall weight on my arms and hands than a smaller rider would.

    Regarding seat position, I have lowered the saddle height to move my center of gravity back off my hands a bit. The tops of my thighs still angle downward at the top of the pedal stroke, though, and I haven't encountered any knee pain, so I don't think I have dropped the saddle too low yet. The saddle angle has always been perfectly parallel to the ground. I've found that angling the nose up even a little, puts a too much pressure on the naughty bits on longer rides. As for fore/aft, I agree that sliding the saddle so far forward is not good, but until I can scrape together the dough for a shorter (and probably high-rise) stem, it is the best solution I could think of. It does place my knees forward of the KOPS position but, again, not enough to cause any noticeable strain on the knee yet.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569
    If cleaning the rims didn't solve the squeal issue, sanding and alcohol on the pads was going to be my next step.

    As for the saddle, no, the LBS didn't offer a fitting when I purchased the bike. That probably should have been my first clue.

    I have tried shifting hand positions as often as possible, but I find once the hand goes numb initially, shifting positions only provides relief for a few minutes before the numbness creeps back again.

    I know that part of the problem, also, is that I am a Clydesdale and am, thus, putting even more overall weight on my arms and hands than a smaller rider would.

    Regarding seat position, I have lowered the saddle height to move my center of gravity back off my hands a bit. The tops of my thighs still angle downward at the top of the pedal stroke, though, and I haven't encountered any knee pain, so I don't think I have dropped the saddle too low yet. The saddle angle has always been perfectly parallel to the ground. I've found that angling the nose up even a little, puts a too much pressure on the naughty bits on longer rides. As for fore/aft, I agree that sliding the saddle so far forward is not good, but until I can scrape together the dough for a shorter (and probably high-rise) stem, it is the best solution I could think of. It does place my knees forward of the KOPS position but, again, not enough to cause any noticeable strain on the knee yet.
    Two clarifications. I forgot to mention Scotch Brite (or some no name brand) no scratch pads along with the denatured alcohol to clean the rims. I said rags or paper towels, although they're fine for cleaning the pads (before/ after sanding).

    Second..
    Too high or too low saddle height causes knee pain, and generally speaking, saddle height has a single purpose and remains constant, so be careful of making adjustments to it. Saddle tilted down (I know you don't have your positioned this way) or level and/ or saddle too far forward can shift weight to the front, thus my suggestion to recheck KOPS. My gut says if you kept the saddle level and relocated it to KOPS or just (5 mm's) behind, that would ease your hand numbness.

    Disclaimer: My gut isn't always right!

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352
    Two clarifications. I forgot to mention Scotch Brite (or some no name brand) no scratch pads along with the denatured alcohol to clean the rims. I said rags or paper towels, although they're fine for cleaning the pads (before/ after sanding).

    Second..
    Too high or too low saddle height causes knee pain, and generally speaking, saddle height has a single purpose and remains constant, so be careful of making adjustments to it. Saddle tilted down (I know you don't have your positioned this way) or level and/ or saddle too far forward can shift weight to the front, thus my suggestion to recheck KOPS. My gut says if you kept the saddle level and relocated it to KOPS or just (5 mm's) behind, that would ease your hand numbness.

    Disclaimer: My gut isn't always right!
    I'll give it a shot. Intuitively, it seems like moving the seat back will stretch me out further, but I see where that might transfer more weight to my shoulders and less to the hands. It's certainly worth a try.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569
    I'll give it a shot. Intuitively, it seems like moving the seat back will stretch me out further, but I see where that might transfer more weight to my shoulders and less to the hands. It's certainly worth a try.
    Yes, moving the saddle back will extend reach, but it will also shift your weight to the rear (literally) - sit bones. You'll still need to adjust your reach and/ or bar height with a new stem, so until then you make a choice and compromise.

    The moral of the story is each adjustment has a purpose and making an incorrect adjustment to 'fix' a fit issue could generate another fit issue, if you follow me. IMO that link I provided offers some very useful info for bike setups.

    BTW, take what I offer as a good faith effort to assist. In no way am I attempting to press you to make any adjustments you don't feel comfortable making.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352
    Yes, moving the saddle back will extend reach, but it will also shift your weight to the rear (literally) - sit bones. You'll still need to adjust your reach and/ or bar height with a new stem, so until then you make a choice and compromise.

    The moral of the story is each adjustment has a purpose and making an incorrect adjustment to 'fix' a fit issue could generate another fit issue, if you follow me. IMO that link I provided offers some very useful info for bike setups.

    BTW, take what I offer as a good faith effort to assist. In no way am I attempting to press you to make any adjustments you don't feel comfortable making.
    Understood. I am all about the comfort, so if the change doesn't improve the numbness issue, or trades it for something worse, I'll move it back until I can get a new stem or find an alternate solution. Thanks for your help.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  20. #45
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    I spent a little time this evening working on the bike. I took PJ352's advice and adjusted the seat height up slightly and back a bit from it's far forward position.

    I also adjusted the front brake pads, toeing them in a bit. A few laps around the driveway and no more squealing brakes thus far.

    The weekend I am planning my longest ride yet with the Speedster. The combination of MUTs and road should make for 40+ miles out and 40+ back. I haven't ridden this particular route in quite a while so it should prove to be a good test for both me and the bike. The last time I did, I managed to take the photo below. I was zipping along the trail and saw this view out of the corner of my eye. I remember slamming on the brakes and nearly crashing out I liked the way the branches surrounding the view in the distance form the shape of a heart.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  21. #46
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    I hope the adjustments work for you. IME, near optimal fit is an illusive target requiring tweaks along the way, so I'd be more comfortable if you got some saddle time in before your 80 mile jaunt. Wouldn't be a bad idea to bring a couple of allen wrenches along as well.

    Beautiful shot, BTW.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352
    I hope the adjustments work for you. IME, near optimal fit is an illusive target requiring tweaks along the way, so I'd be more comfortable if you got some saddle time in before your 80 mile jaunt. Wouldn't be a bad idea to bring a couple of allen wrenches along as well.

    Beautiful shot, BTW.
    Thanks. Way ahead of you on the allen wrenches. They are one of the many things I carry in that oversized seat bag. True also about "optimal fit" as the body changes from day to day and sometimes hour to hour. Part of the plan for the 80 miler is to make a tweak if necessary and have sufficient time to really gauge if it helped. We'll see how it goes.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  23. #48
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    74.95 miles of fun...mostly

    A fantastic day on the bike today for the most part. Left the house around 8am and rode a combination of MUTs and roads. Trails were in great shape. The weather was beautiful. Encountered a number of swarms of gnat-like bugs bordering on a biblical plague, but hey, free protein.

    The Speedster performed flawlessly. The steering continues to be tight. Shifts remain clean. I have a little over 200 miles on the bike since getting it back from the crankset replacement in August and everything seems to be broken in nicely. There is no more problem with cross-chaining. With the 11-25 cassette, I can now ride 50/23 or 34/12 if necessary with no rubbing on the F/D. Wheels are holding true despite my size, some good sized potholes, and a relatively low spoke count (20 front, 24 rear). Once I adjusted the toe on the front brakes, the previous squealing issue is now a thing of the past. The brakes grab nicely.

    Today's ride did confirm my suspicions that I will need to purchase a new stem in the future, particularly before I attempt this long of a ride again. After almost 75 miles, understandably, my legs are tired, my butt is a little sore, my back is a little stiff, but my hands (specifically the base of each palm at the wrist) just plain hurt.

    I had adjusted the seat up slightly and back significantly before the ride to basically reset to a closer KOPS position and in the hopes of taking some pressure off my hands. The first 10 miles or so went pretty well. After that, the numbness started, followed by an aching pain. I tried changing up hand positions as often as possible but once the pain started, nothing helped. The last 10 miles I felt like I was moving my hands every other minute trying to find some position that would provide some relief. I ended up taking a shortcut on the ride back.

    In this case, it's not the bike. It's me. I have come to the realization that my combination of weight and short reach place too much pressure on my hands with the 0 degree 110mm stem that is standard on the bike. With the saddle in the correct position, it sits several inches above the level of the bars. This is, of course, as it probably should be for riders who are 170lbs., in good shape, and comfortable riding in a more aero position. For me, though, it just doesn't work. Maybe someday, but not now. I'll be looking for an angled stem (40 degrees perhaps) with a length of 100 or maybe even 90mm.

    So, that's the ride report. Hands, aside, it was an excellent day overall on the bike. With the bad experience with the LBS behind me, I am very pleased with the performance of the Speedster thus far.
    Last edited by Opus51569; 09-19-2009 at 04:53 PM.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569
    I have come to the realization that my combination of weight and short reach place too much pressure on my hands with the 0 degree 110mm stem that is standard on the bike. With the saddle in the correct position, it sits several inches above the level of the bars. This is, of course, as it probably should be for riders who are 170lbs., in good shape, and comfortable riding in a more aero position. For me, though, it just doesn't work. Maybe someday, but not now. I'll be looking for an angled stem (40 degrees perhaps) with a length of 100 or maybe even 90mm.

    So, that's the ride report. Hands, aside, it was an excellent day overall on the bike. With the bad experience with the LBS behind me, I am very pleased with the performance of the Speedster thus far.
    Aside from the continuing hand pain, I'm glad you enjoyed your ride and are happy with your bikes performance.

    The saddle adjustments were meant to better position your weight (and reset your knees to KOPS), but I always thought you'd be looking at a less aggressive, shorter stem.

    I doubt yours is now a 0 degree, more likely a -6 or -8 degree, so you might want to try flipping it up, making it a +6 or +8. It won't change reach much, but it will raise the bars. I guessed at a couple of things, so don't hold me to these numbers, but I calculated about 7 mm's shorter reach and 22 mm's higher.

    Those estimates are based on a +6 degree/ 110 mm stem, 73 degree HT angle and 30 mm's of spacers. May be worth a shot till you can swing a shorter stem. Plus it'll give you some saddle time to see if the drop is to your liking.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352
    Aside from the continuing hand pain, I'm glad you enjoyed your ride and are happy with your bikes performance.

    The saddle adjustments were meant to better position your weight (and reset your knees to KOPS), but I always thought you'd be looking at a less aggressive, shorter stem.

    I doubt yours is now a 0 degree, more likely a -6 or -8 degree, so you might want to try flipping it up, making it a +6 or +8. It won't change reach much, but it will raise the bars. I guessed at a couple of things, so don't hold me to these numbers, but I calculated about 7 mm's shorter reach and 22 mm's higher.

    Those estimates are based on a +6 degree/ 110 mm stem, 73 degree HT angle and 30 mm's of spacers. May be worth a shot till you can swing a shorter stem. Plus it'll give you some saddle time to see if the drop is to your liking.
    Yeah, I was hoping a saddle change might have delayed the inevitable, but not in this case. And for shorter rides it's not really an issue, occasional numbness, but no real pain.

    As for the current stem, I am basing the 0 degree mostly on the look of it. If you have a moment, could you scroll down to the pics I posted previously of the bike and take a look. The stem is in a few of the shots. I am guessing 0 because the angle of the stem currently is parallel to the ground, but that doesn't take in to account the angle of the head tube, so you might be right about the angle.

    Thanks, as always, for the input.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

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