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  1. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by berndrea
    I guess I'll post my 09 s40 . . . 105 RD, Ultegra triple, Conti tires, FSA Carbon seatpost. Still need to upgrade the shifters and front derailleur, and maybe the brakes from my carbon (ultegra 6600)
    I have a friend in Woodinville who tells me you have some significant climbs in your area, so I'm guessing the triple is a real asset. Otherwise, it might make sense to go to a compact crank if you change the shifters. Just my two cents worth. Gotta love that classic Scott racing color scheme. It reminds me of my Addict.

  2. #152
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    I have a bike with a compact on it. The triple is super nice, because I rode home from work (super sick and didnt want the girlfriend to pick me up) so I was feeling super weak... Needed the extra gear. The color was the ONLY reason why I bought the s40, and the price shipped! it was 719 delivered to my door. but mainly the color... lol

  3. #153
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    That's a very nice S40. Thanks for sharing the pic!
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  4. #154
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    I only took it for a 10 min spin last night, then I made a couple of adjustments and put the 'puter on. This morning I went for a ride and it was like flying on a cloud.

  5. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by superg
    I only took it for a 10 min spin last night, then I made a couple of adjustments and put the 'puter on. This morning I went for a ride and it was like flying on a cloud.
    I read somewhere that bicycles are the most efficient mode of personal land transportation on the planet, from a pure energy efficiency point of view. Somehow, that technical statement does not capture the experience nearly as well as your observation.

  6. #156
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    Function 1 - Form 0 and some lessons learned

    A while back, on a lark, I decided to put the original Scott saddle back on the bike. I got to wondering if maybe I hadn't given it enough of a "break-in" period before swapping it out. I've always liked the look of the saddle on the bike. Maybe it was more comfortable than I thought.

    I did a few 20 mile rides and one 30 miler and was surprised by how good the saddle felt. There was a little soreness, but nothing debilitating. Perhaps I had been too hasty. Perhaps the stock saddle was just the right combination of form and function.

    This past Saturday, I took the bike for a 53 mile ride. The ride out was relatively comfortable. On the way back, I started to notice an increasing amount of pain specifically in the perineum. Interesting how pain has a way of clarifying one's thinking. By the time I got home, I was certain about a few things:

    1.) I am a Clydesdale, and while I hope to not be at some point in the future, I am now. More weight simply means more psi for every contact point with the bike (pedals, bars and seat). And while your experience may be different, for me, softer feels better.

    2.) I am not a racer, sprinter, nor climber...nor will I ever be. I have no use for a saddle that is aerodynamic, or light weight. I will never ride "on the rivet" unless my positioning on the bike has gone horribly wrong

    3.) I am not wealthy enough to "keep up with the Jones'" when it comes to cycling...nor will I ever be. I'm sure there are saddles out there that have what I'm looking for (decent padding, 150mm+ width, a cutout, good looks, etc.) I've seen them. Specialized and Fizik both make them. But those saddles aren't 30 bucks, or $50 or $100.

    It's two days later and the perineum is still sore. I removed the stock saddle and put the Terry Cite Y back on. It doesn't look nearly as nice, but the padding and cutout are more comfortable for me and the way I ride.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  7. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569
    I am not wealthy enough to "keep up with the Jones'" when it comes to cycling...nor will I ever be. I'm sure there are saddles out there that have what I'm looking for (decent padding, 150mm+ width, a cutout, good looks, etc.) I've seen them. Specialized and Fizik both make them. But those saddles aren't 30 bucks, or $50 or $100.
    I believe you made a wise decision. Some or all of these circumstances may change . . . but, the original Scott saddle (the same or similar to what came with my Addict R4) will always be an uncomfortable POS.

  8. #158
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    I haven't gone more than 35 miles at a time and so far no problems in the butt area. I'll see how things proceed. I'll keep doing moderate distances until my behind gets used again to a hard saddle. I believe baby steps are the key to success.
    Other than that, one thing that made me pick a Scott is the quality of the welds. They are a lot smoother than other brands I've looked at (Trek, Norco, Jamis and Cannondale). It may seem a small thing but it proves attention to details.

  9. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by superg
    I haven't gone more than 35 miles at a time and so far no problems in the butt area. I'll see how things proceed. I'll keep doing moderate distances until my behind gets used again to a hard saddle. I believe baby steps are the key to success.
    Other than that, one thing that made me pick a Scott is the quality of the welds. They are a lot smoother than other brands I've looked at (Trek, Norco, Jamis and Cannondale). It may seem a small thing but it proves attention to details.
    I found the seat to be pretty comfortable for 20-30 mile rides. It wasn't until I hit the 50+ miler that I realized that it...and my Clyde butt...were not compatible If I ever do manage to slim down maybe I'll give it another try. In the meantime, it's the Terry for me. You're right, though, that incrementally increasing the mileage is the way to go. It will allow for the proper break-in of both you and the saddle.

    It's interesting that you mention the welds, because I have to say the seat tube/top tube/seat stay weld on my bike is about the only thing I still don't like about it aesthetically. The first picture on post #143 gives a pretty decent closeup of what I'm talking about. I didn't expect the welds to be ground smooth, but there's way too much slag left there and even a nice paint job cannot hide it. I'm guessing they've addressed the problem on the 2010 models and, if so, kudos to Scott and good for you.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  10. #160
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    lube ?

    I noticed the lube on the chain is as sticky as honey and picks up a lot of dust. When I wipe the chain the gunk moves from the outside to the inside of the chain links (bad!). Do you think I should clean the chain with degreaser and then apply some dry lubricant ? I don't plan to ride in the rain, ever. Thanks for any (good) advice.
    Other than that, I went out on a longer ride this morning (45 mi) and everything went superr. No pains, no aches.

  11. #161
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    I skip the de-greasing step.

    The stuff on new Shimano chains is an excellent lubricant. My new chains stay really quiet for a long time. On outer surfaces, an immediate application of my favorite lubricant to help wipe off the sticky stuff works well for me. Your mileage may vary . . .

    Oh, and congratulations on the good, longer ride!

  12. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by TucsonMTB
    I skip the de-greasing step.

    The stuff on new Shimano chains is an excellent lubricant. My new chains stay really quiet for a long time. On outer surfaces, an immediate application of my favorite lubricant to help wipe off the sticky stuff works well for me. Your mileage may vary . . .

    Oh, and congratulations on the good, longer ride!
    +1 Sheldon Brown has a good article on chain cleaning/lubing and mentions that the original lube on the chain is probably the best lube it will ever have. Don't take it off yet. Put a few hundred miles on the bike first, just be sure to wipe it down after each ride.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  13. #163
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    The Hutchinson's are History... I think

    I've posted this as a separate thread on the Ride Reports forum, but long-story-short, the back tire on the Speedster blew out today. Ended up with an inch-long gash down the center of the tread. The blowout had enough force to push the inner thread fabric of the tire up and out the hole. I never saw a cause for the blow-out...no pothole, rocks, glass or other debris. I was riding along on a smooth MUT about 25 miles from home. I tried replacing the tube and booting the tire, but the tire had a sizeable bulge and the tear got larger so I thought it best to call it a day (and call for a ride) before things went from bad to worse.

    If you'll recall, this is the second flat that I've had on the rear wheel. The first one was a month or so ago and it happened at the end of a ride shortly after hitting a good sized pothole. I chalked that flat up to a combination of the hole I hit and the no-name tube that came with the bike. I replaced that tube with a Michelin AirStop which was on the bike today. I inspected the tire at the time and found no problems with it but its entirely possible there was something I missed which helped precipitate the flat today.

    In terms of a review, it's therefore hard to know what to say about the Hutchinson Equinox tires that came standard on the Speedster since I can't determine what exactly caused the blowout. The tires only have about 600 miles on them, but I can't fault the Hutchinsons out-of-hand without a more obvious cause.

    So... I'm debating whether to auction a kidney and take this opportunity to buy a set of 25s to replace the 23s and keep the Hutchinson front tire as a spare. I know Gatorskins have a great reputation, and I've also been very happy with the Krylions I currently have on the Trek. They take a serious beating on my commutes to work and have proven to be very durable thus far.

    I called around to the LBSs when I got home. Both the Contis and the Michelins retail here for around $60 each. They are less expensive online, but by the time you factor in shipping it comes out to just about the same.

    [BTW, there is no reason why a good bicycle tire should cost more than a decent tire for my car! Thus endeth the mini-rant.]

    Until I figure out what to do, the Speedster is currently up on blocks (i.e. sitting in the workstand minus both wheels) in the garage. More updates as they happen...
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  14. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569
    In terms of a review, it's therefore hard to know what to say about the Hutchinson Equinox tires that came standard on the Speedster since I can't determine what exactly caused the blowout. The tires only have about 600 miles on them, but I can't fault the Hutchinsons out-of-hand without a more obvious cause.

    Until I figure out what to do, the Speedster is currently up on blocks (i.e. sitting in the workstand minus both wheels) in the garage. More updates as they happen...
    My Addict R4 also came with Hutchinson's. After the POS saddle, they were the first thing to get replaced at less than 100 miles. I really like Vittoria Open Corsa EVO CX 700 x 23C Black/Black Aramid Bead tires (also about $60 delivered). They are NOT particularly durable lasting me about 1500 to 2000 miles in the rear, depending on what kind of thorns I hit. However, the front has over 4500 so far and still has plenty of tread. They have a very nice ride. As an old guy with time running out, the ride is more important to me than durability.

    I'm sending you a PM to get your mailing address and will mail you the two original Hutchinson tires, if you like. That should give you some cost effective mileage.

  15. #165
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    The 2010 Speedsters come with Conti "Sport" tires.
    Me, I'm partial to Michelin Lithions for overall general usage, Panaracer Paselas (w/Tour Guard) for longevity, and Veloflex Paves for road feel.
    Other countries need to stop hatin' or we'll unfriend them. - Christine

    Apparently I left my reading comprehension glasses in my ass. - DrRoebuck

    Still, it felt great and I felt like I was sitting on some kind of vibrator -Touch0Gray

  16. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by TucsonMTB
    My Addict R4 also came with Hutchinson's. After the POS saddle, they were the first thing to get replaced at less than 100 miles. I really like Vittoria Open Corsa EVO CX 700 x 23C Black/Black Aramid Bead tires (also about $60 delivered). They are NOT particularly durable lasting me about 1500 to 2000 miles in the rear, depending on what kind of thorns I hit. However, the front has over 4500 so far and still has plenty of tread. They have a very nice ride. As an old guy with time running out, the ride is more important to me than durability.

    I'm sending you a PM to get your mailing address and will mail you the two original Hutchinson tires, if you like. That should give you some cost effective mileage.
    I got your PM before I saw your post here. That's incredibly generous of you, but the "kidney" thing is a bit of an exaggeration. I'll make it work. I'm enjoying the bike too much to have it be shoeless for very long . Seriously, though, thank you for the offer.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  17. #167
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    So sorry to hear about your tire problems. Btw, my S30 came with Conti Ultra Sport, which I just replaced yesterday with the Hutchinson Equinox that I got on sale from Nashbar. I also replaced the original tubes (noname chinese long valve) with Vittoria tubes, just for practice. Too early to tell the difference / am I asking for trouble ? .
    It's probably true the original lube on the chain is the BEST water repellant ever, but again, it picks up even the smallest speck of dust, so with even less than 500k on it there is already gunk on the chain, which wiping will only push on the inside of the links, then moving to the chainrings and ders.

  18. #168
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    Tucson or others here may have more experience with the Hutchinson's than I do, but I don't think you're necessarily headed for trouble just because I had a blowout. I have to admit that I didn't follow some very basic advice of checking the tires carefully between rides. There may have been a warning sign there that I missed. Just keep an eye on them and, if worse comes to worse, you've always got the Contis as a spare.

    As for the lube, if you think it's doing more harm than good, take the plunge and do a good cleaning and relube...you know you're going to anyway
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  19. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569
    A while back, on a lark, I decided to put the original Scott saddle back on the bike. I got to wondering if maybe I hadn't given it enough of a "break-in" period before swapping it out. I've always liked the look of the saddle on the bike. Maybe it was more comfortable than I thought.

    I did a few 20 mile rides and one 30 miler and was surprised by how good the saddle felt. There was a little soreness, but nothing debilitating. Perhaps I had been too hasty. Perhaps the stock saddle was just the right combination of form and function.

    This past Saturday, I took the bike for a 53 mile ride. The ride out was relatively comfortable. On the way back, I started to notice an increasing amount of pain specifically in the perineum. Interesting how pain has a way of clarifying one's thinking. By the time I got home, I was certain about a few things:

    1.) I am a Clydesdale, and while I hope to not be at some point in the future, I am now. More weight simply means more psi for every contact point with the bike (pedals, bars and seat). And while your experience may be different, for me, softer feels better.

    2.) I am not a racer, sprinter, nor climber...nor will I ever be. I have no use for a saddle that is aerodynamic, or light weight. I will never ride "on the rivet" unless my positioning on the bike has gone horribly wrong

    3.) I am not wealthy enough to "keep up with the Jones'" when it comes to cycling...nor will I ever be. I'm sure there are saddles out there that have what I'm looking for (decent padding, 150mm+ width, a cutout, good looks, etc.) I've seen them. Specialized and Fizik both make them. But those saddles aren't 30 bucks, or $50 or $100.

    It's two days later and the perineum is still sore. I removed the stock saddle and put the Terry Cite Y back on. It doesn't look nearly as nice, but the padding and cutout are more comfortable for me and the way I ride.

    Serfas gustoso!! the best saddle ever, especialy if you have a non racing ass its better then any fizik for 1/4 of the prize

  20. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucascarvajal
    Serfas gustoso!! the best saddle ever, especialy if you have a non racing ass its better then any fizik for 1/4 of the prize
    Serfas certainly has a wide variety of saddles as seen here on their website. Which model is the "gustoso"?

  21. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by TucsonMTB
    Serfas certainly has a wide variety of saddles as seen here on their website. Which model is the "gustoso"?
    soory is VST-1 Vistoso, not gustoso as i said before, its the best saddle ever!!! i try already fizik arione, fizik pave, anda cuple of san marcos. SERFAS ROCKSSSS!!!

  22. #172
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    The VST-1 looks nice. But I think I prefer a cutout...and the 135mm width is probably a bit narrow for me .
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  23. #173
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    I will stick with what works for me. From the WTB website:

    The Laser V Team has a smooth shape with no sharp edges, making it a great XC, all mountain, or long-distance road saddle. Unsure which saddle is right for your anatomy? The Laser V's subtle shape makes it the ideal first choice.

    * Rail: Titanium
    * Weight: 275g
    * Soft Shell
    * DNA Padding

    I found mine (and a spare) on eBay. The lowest regular mail order dealer price I have seen is $60 from GreenFish Adventure Sports.

    Yeah, it might be a little heavy, but it's very comfortable for me on longer (and shorter) rides.

  24. #174
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    My 09 Speedster came with the stock Hutchinson Equinox tires on it as well. This spring during an quick inspection I've notice a small (about 1" long) mark, kind of a slit looking on a small section of my rear tire, I only of about 800 miles on the now. I'm keeping on it but also looking into replacing the tire with SCHWABLE ULTREMO R1's
    "I refuse to be afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday & I love today!!"

    "There are only two ways to establish competitive advantage: do things better than others or do them differently."

    "Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there."

    2010 Orbea Onix w/Ultegra R8000
    2009 SCOTT Speedster w/Ultegra 6800
    2007 IRONHORSE HT

  25. #175
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    Time for a new thread?

    With this being the 175th post on this particular thread it occurs to me that a new thread might be in order. The thread started as a review of the Speedster but it has expanded over time. The initial review has become an extended ride test now that I've had the bike for almost a year. The thread now includes regular posts from folks who own Speedsters as well as other Scott bikes. So, I'm starting a sequel thread entitled: Speedsters and Addicts and CR1s, oh my!. Look for it on a forum near you and I hope to see all the "regulars" or anyone else with an interest in Scott bikes, there...
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

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