Speedsters and Addicts and CR1s...oh my! - Page 3
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  1. #51
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    I believe you would both be more comfortable if you can find some good stiff shoes. In my experience, Sidi makes some of the most comfortable. Their mountain shoes offer excellent "walk-ability" for comfort off the bike.

    Once you find a pair that properly supports your foot, you will be free to pick clip-less pedals that work well for you. You may find, as I do, that SPD cleats and pedals are very easy to use.

    Admittedly, my wife and I have been riding both road and mountain bikes for a long time. Graduating from clips with straps and cleats to clip-less was wonderful. Living in Arizona, we often wear biking sandals with SPD cleats. They are remarkably comfortable in our warm summers.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by slow climb
    I just replaced my toe clips (free with the bike) with the old flat pedals off my Cannondale super v 500,as I was forever slipping off them,
    the plastic cage would never let me get my foot straight back onto the pedal,and the underside are curved so they are only one sided,
    The old flats feel a lot smoother too !

    A friend of mine just bought some blue welgo's that look the same as yours,and he was wondering if the pegs unscrewed (they look molded on)

    KK..
    Mine are removable with a small Allen wrench.
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by TucsonMTB
    I believe you would both be more comfortable if you can find some good stiff shoes. In my experience, Sidi makes some of the most comfortable. Their mountain shoes offer excellent "walk-ability" for comfort off the bike.

    Once you find a pair that properly supports your foot, you will be free to pick clip-less pedals that work well for you. You may find, as I do, that SPD cleats and pedals are very easy to use.

    Admittedly, my wife and I have been riding both road and mountain bikes for a long time. Graduating from clips with straps and cleats to clip-less was wonderful. Living in Arizona, we often wear biking sandals with SPD cleats. They are remarkably comfortable in our warm summers.
    It's a choice I've debated back and forth for a while and I may yet take the plunge someday. Right now, convenience and price win out.
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  4. #54
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    "Mine are removable with a small Allen wrench"

    yep the mates do come out but with a philips screwdriver,

    KK..
    Onwards and Upwards

  5. #55
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    So, it's been the rainiest year on record, but I've been scrimping and saving this summer. I found a great sale at Ribble and made a few purchases figuring if I can't ride...I can upgrade .

    1.) I grew weary of waiting for Specialized to restock (or even offer an e.t.a. for when they might restock) their white Avatar saddles. So I went for a Selle Italia instead. With the exchange rate, it ended up being $38 so if it doesn't work I guess it won't be the end of the world.
    2.) I also picked up a 5700 12-27 cassette. I swapped it out with the 5600 11-25 that came with the bike. The process was pretty straight-forward with only a few adjustments needed to the RD limit screws and the cable tension to realign with the largest and smallest cog.

    I've only been able to take it around the block a few times, but the extra two teeth on the low end make more of a difference than I expected. More to come once I can put in some more miles...

    UPDATE: I managed to get in a 20mile shake-out ride on Saturday and a 50miler on Sunday morning. Some initial thoughts:

    1.) There will be a break-in period (mostly for my butt) with the new saddle. The 20mile ride ended with what I thought was only some mild soreness. I didn't realize how sore I was until I got on the bike again the next day. By the 40th mile or so on Sunday, I was thankful to encounter enough of a hill to get out of the saddle . The good news, though, is the soreness seems to be localized to my sit bones, so I think it's just a question of adjusting to the stiffness of the saddle. Time will tell.
    2.) The 12-27 cassette worked flawlessly. I knew I wouldn't miss the 11t cog but the new 27t gives me a 34/27 combo for spinning up the short (but steep) climbs. It also gives me 50/25 with less cross-chaining than I had with the 11-25 cassette. All in all, I think it was definitely worth the investment.
    Last edited by Opus51569; 08-29-2010 at 02:01 PM.
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  6. #56
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    Hi Everyone.

    I just caught up on this thread and its progenitor over the last hour+. Great read, as I just bought a S30 today. Thanks to all for the info, OP in particular.

    I biked a fair amount as a kid, always $50 K-Mart specials (but, hey, one of those dirt-cheap MTBs got me the whole way through college, and was pretty good with stairs). About a year ago, I upgraded from yet another flea market bottom-of-the-line Huffy to a Schwinn Voyageur GS. It was wonderful for the ride to/from the metro - 1.5 miles each way.

    Then on DC's "Bike to Work Day" this spring I decided to do something silly - I biked to work. 18 miles each way. Thought I might die. Didn't. Instead, I was hooked. I go over two huge highways on the way. When they're bumper-to-bumper, a profound sense of smugness washes over me. I've been biking roughly once a week since that first trip.

    The limitations of the comfort bike have since became painfully (sometimes literally) apparent. The absurdly wide/cushy seat would get pretty painful toward the end of the ride home sometimes (though my butt has toughened a bit, I think). I can only get into the lowest front gear about half of the time I try (this after ~1000 miles of getting used to its idiosyncrasies). It's heavy. It's slow.

    I started looking at new bikes about 6 weeks ago, with a ~$1000 budget. I wasn't sure how big of a change to make - hybrid? Cyclocross? Road? I considered a Fuji Cross Comp, Fuji Absolute 1.0 (LBS had a nice sale going on), Bianchi 7 Via Narone Sora, half the stuff Surly puts out, and finally the S30. I eventually came to the conclusion that:

    1) The straight-out handlebars on the Absolute combined with a less-upright style (compared to the goofy Schwinn) were going to kill my wrists. I guess it could also be that test-driving a too-big Absolute didn't help matters, but trying out the other bikes convinced me I do fact like drops and hoods. (Those disc brakes were pretty awesome, though.)
    2) I wouldn't give up the eyelets for a rear rack without a fight.
    3) Tiagra/105 components really do seem nicer than Sora, especially the shifter (Dear Sora Shifter, how am I supposed to hit that little trigger from the drops?). I guess the perceived shifting improvements could just be the power of suggestion, but whatever.

    So that led me to the S30. I did like how the Binachi had brakes on the tops, but it didn't seem like a big deal to forego that. I ending up paying $999 for the S30. Told the LBS I could get the same bike from REI for $150 less (hooray smartphone); they threw in a rack, installed, and a cable lock for me (already have a U). At that point, I was already there and they had been nice and helpful, so I didn't mind missing out the absolute lowest price. I'll pick it up tomorrow on the way home from work.

    The bike shop is actually right off of the path I commute on, so I got to try out sections of little climbs and such that I'm used to. The difference from the Voyageur is staggering. I feel like the climbs take half the effort. I also found, after trying two bikes with toe clips and then back to one without, that those things really do make a difference. But I hated trying to wriggle my toes in there, so I bought clip-less pedals and shoes while I was there. I'm assuming I'll forget to clip out in time for a stop at least once. Hopefully one ugly incident will be all I need to remember.

    I've lowered my average times for 36 miles round trip from 3hr30 to 2hr45 since I started out. I'm hoping the new ride will save me another 10 minutes each way after the first trip or two. I also feel like it will provide a much higher ceiling as I get into better shape. I figure I'll have some growing pains with the radically different posture and saddle, but I think it will work out in the long run.

    Anyway, cool forum you all have here, I may just keep dropping in from time to time.

  7. #57
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    So my first trip, yesterday, was a minor disaster. The bike shop did not offer a fitting, so I just eyeballed the seat height and went 4 miles to the metro. I forgot my bungee stuff, so my backpack stayed on my back. After the first 2 miles, my lower back was exhausted and my butt hurt like crazy.

    Last night, I took the saddle down an inch and a half and tilted the handlebars up maybe 5 degrees from where they were. On the morning ride I stuck the backpack on the rack where it belongs. That made a world of difference and I made it through my normal 18 miles without any real issue from my back or underside (though I definitely gave a workout to some muscles that never got very involved on the comfort bike). I'm quickly getting used to the idea of putting more weight on my legs and shoulders and less on my saddle. I expect to be a little sore around the sit bones after the ride back, but I bet I'll toughen up soon enough.

    I think I'm taking to the clipless pedals pretty quickly. I had an embarrassing start early in the ride where two other guys with snap-ins left me in the dust while I fumbled for 15 seconds. The last 2 or 3 attempts I locked in within 2 or 3 seconds. The shoes are crazy comfortable.

    I stopped for 2-3 minutes in the middle to take stock of how my body was doing and it still ended up being my fastest time ever (though only by a minute). Good stuff. Hooray road bikes. Hooray Scott.
    Last edited by goat000; 09-09-2010 at 10:44 AM.

  8. #58
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    First off, goat000, welcome to the forums!

    Glad to hear you're enjoying your new S30. Part of the initial fun is dialing it in. Soon, you'll experience your first pangs of upgrade-itis...and it's all downhill from there

    Post up a pic when you get a chance.
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by goat000
    So my first trip, yesterday, was a minor disaster. The bike shop did not offer a fitting, so I just eyeballed the seat height and went 4 miles to the metro. I forgot my bungee stuff, so my backpack stayed on my back. After the first 2 miles, my lower back was exhausted and my butt hurt like crazy.

    Last night, I took the saddle down an inch and a half and tilted the handlebars up maybe 5 degrees from where they were. On the morning ride I stuck the backpack on the rack where it belongs. That made a world of difference and I made it through my normal 18 miles without any real issue from my back or underside (though I definitely gave a workout to some muscles that never got very involved on the comfort bike). I'm quickly getting used to the idea of putting more weight on my legs and shoulders and less on my saddle. I expect to be a little sore around the sit bones after the ride back, but I bet I'll toughen up soon enough.

    I think I'm taking to the clipless pedals pretty quickly. I had an embarrassing start early in the ride where two other guys with snap-ins left me in the dust while I fumbled for 15 seconds. The last 2 or 3 attempts I locked in within 2 or 3 seconds. The shoes are crazy comfortable.

    I stopped for 2-3 minutes in the middle to take stock of how my body was doing and it still ended up being my fastest time ever (though only by a minute). Good stuff. Hooray road bikes. Hooray Scott.
    Hey Goat!

    Allow me echo Opus' welcome to the forum. It sounds like your new Scott is treating you well and you are quickly picking up the skills that make riding road bikes a pleasure. That's a good thing.

    A fit session will only get you close, sometime very close, to your best position, so working it out on your own is certainly a viable option. It does help to ride with an experienced cyclist, preferably a racer, who has your best interests at heart. He or she can watch to make certain your pelvis is not rocking from too high a saddle and that your knees are not too acutely bent from too low a saddle. It's good to have someone check to make certain the axis of your knee with your crank arms parallel to the ground is right over the pedal spindle, indicating proper horizontal saddle position. For that, you need a second person with a plumb bob or something similar.

    Handlebar angle is truly whatever is most comfortable. It's easy to experiment with so keep tweaking, with very small changes, until your hands and wrists are truly happy.

    That's a nice enough bike that upgrading components will probably never be a high priority, but if it ever becomes so, check out SpeedGoat Cycles in Google. With your forum name, it's a natural.

    Last but not least . . . show us some pictures of your new steed when you get a chance. If you can get someone to take some of you on the bike, you might even be able to critique your own position by comparing it with pictures of the pros. But, most of all, here's hoping you continue to enjoy your new machine and don't push yourself too hard. It's supposed to be fun.
    Last edited by TucsonMTB; 09-10-2010 at 11:19 PM. Reason: Poor spelling . . .

  10. #60
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    Just a quick shot because I cleaned it a little. Anything I can do about the tires? I was thinking Mr. Clean magic eraser.


  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by e34john
    Just a quick shot because I cleaned it a little. Anything I can do about the tires? I was thinking Mr. Clean magic eraser.
    Shiny side up, dirty side down. It looks like you already have it under control.

    Oh, and nice bike!

  12. #62
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    Nice ride, e34john!

    For the tires, I usually just wipe them off with a damp cloth when I want to inspect them for nicks, cuts, etc. I don't know how abrasive the eraser might be.
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  13. #63
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    Thanks guys, once I get new pedals/shoes and the Cavendish stem. I think I will be good for a while. Was going to really upgrade it but I think I'd rather have another bike

    Seeing those beach crusier pedals makes me a little sad.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by e34john
    Thanks guys, once I get new pedals/shoes and the Cavendish stem. I think I will be good for a while. Was going to really upgrade it but I think I'd rather have another bike

    Seeing those beach crusier pedals makes me a little sad.

    At $185 on the Chain Reaction Cycles web site, I will need to win a lottery to justify Mark's very cool looking stem. Although he is my hero, since my power output does not approach that of Mr. Cavendish, I will have to pass on the 300 gram bars at any price!

    The Ritchey stem on your bike seems like a better choice, unless you too are amazingly strong.

    But, hey, it is your bike, so whatever makes you happy . . .

  15. #65
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    Just going for looks, thats why I'm not getting the matching bars since thats going to be mostly covered with tape. The Ritchey stem has this dumb looking chrome faceplate with the emblem on it. The Cav stem will probably be too stiff at first but it looks cool.

    Now to learn how to bunny hop finish lines.

  16. #66
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    Ive just put a new 11-28 on my S30
    went out today and it really does work,I was sticking in the middle ring on all the climbs rather than dropping down to the granny ring,
    I got caught up in yet another downpour (even put my overshoes on) the bike handles pretty good on the slippery roads (at least I haven't fell off yet)

    Dam this town for being so hilly


    KK..
    Onwards and Upwards

  17. #67
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    2011 Scott Speedsters.... meh.
    Other countries need to stop hatin' or we'll unfriend them. - Christine

    Apparently I left my reading comprehension glasses in my ass. - DrRoebuck

    Still, it felt great and I felt like I was sitting on some kind of vibrator -Touch0Gray

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius
    2011 Scott Speedsters.... meh.
    The new "color" schemes should be popular with the Goth set.

    Me, I must quickly win a lottery so I can purchase a 2010 Addict RC with its nice, light colors. Yeah, sure.

    And . . . the integral seat mast. I will miss those too.
    Last edited by TucsonMTB; 02-11-2011 at 02:58 PM.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by TucsonMTB
    That's a nice enough bike that upgrading components will probably never be a high priority, but if it ever becomes so, check out SpeedGoat Cycles in Google. With your forum name, it's a natural.

    Last but not least . . . show us some pictures of your new steed when you get a chance. If you can get someone to take some of you on the bike, you might even be able to critique your own position by comparing it with pictures of the pros. But, most of all, here's hoping you continue to enjoy your new machine and don't push yourself too hard. It's supposed to be fun.
    Thanks for the warm welcome guys. Opus, funny story, I got a notification on my phone about your reply while I was waiting for a taxi to pick up my poor stranded self. On the first ride home, I hit a ~2.5-inch discontinuity from the pavement to an overpass, going somewhere between 15 and 20 mph I think. Popped the water bottle clean out of the cage (which I didn't realize until later) and the front tire was flat within 15 seconds. Of course, I was planning to stop by the LBS closest to my house to pick up an inner tube that night. Whoops. It was bad enough that I ended up getting the wheel trued.

    Otherwise the bike is treating me well, and with the aid of some baggy bike shorts I'm getting along better with the seat.

    Never heard of SpeedGoat but if I do upgrade someday I'll definitely have to give them a look, if only for the name. Hopefully this one will last me quite a few years; I'm just almost as focused on saving money vs. taking metro (train) to work as I am getting there fast.

    As for pictures - I think I'll politely decline. The idea is to let it be as ugly as it cares to get, since I'll be locking it up in the city regularly, so there's nothing much to see. It's pure stock with the expected commuter accessories, in the 2010 blue.

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by goat000
    As for pictures - I think I'll politely decline. The idea is to let it be as ugly as it cares to get, since I'll be locking it up in the city regularly, so there's nothing much to see. It's pure stock with the expected commuter accessories, in the 2010 blue.
    Good plan.

    I once dated a young lady who was a student at U of Penn in Philadelphia. She rode a nice, full Campy, Holdsworth. Yeah, that was decades ago . . .

    Anyway, I thought I would surprise her by cleaning her bike one weekend while visiting her downtown apartment. She was surprised, but not pleased for exactly the reasons that you plan to acquire a little "patina" on your steed.

    Live and learn . . . mostly.

  21. #71
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    Just trying out the pic thing..

  22. #72
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    Uh, seems to be working....

  23. #73
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    ^
    Looks great. What kind of tape do you have on those bars?

  24. #74
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    It's fairly cheap tape from my LBS:



    Prologo is the brand name, returns a few hits in google...

  25. #75
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    ...apparently it's the same tape that Katusha use; maybe they've bought all the stocks?

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