• 04-29-2013
    RJP Diver
    11-speed hub with 10-speed cassette?
    Looking at a set of wheels that comes with an 11-speed SRAM/Shimano compatible hub. Seller says that a spacer is included in case buyer wants to use with a 10-speed cassette. I've not done much research into 11-speed systems, so not familar with specs. Is it common/ok to use an "11-speed" hub with a 10-speed cassette? Assuming use of proper spacer, of course. Downsides?
  • 04-29-2013
    Zen Cyclery
    It's doable with a 1.85mm spacer. The one downside is that 11 speed hubs usually have a DS flange that is further inboard than 10 speed. This isn't quite as ideal for rigidity. The real world difference with that though seems to be placebo at best.
  • 04-29-2013
    cxwrench
    no downside.
  • 04-29-2013
    tom_h
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Zen Cyclery View Post
    It's doable with a 1.85mm spacer. The one downside is that 11 speed hubs usually have a DS flange that is further inboard than 10 speed. This isn't quite as ideal for rigidity. The real world difference with that though seems to be placebo at best.

    I've noted Zipp's 2013 model, Version8 hubs have a width of 130.8 mm, up from 130.0.

    Partly mitigates the DS flange spacing issue, while 0.8mm wider probably isnt enough to matter.
  • 04-29-2013
    dcgriz
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RJP Diver View Post
    Looking at a set of wheels that comes with an 11-speed SRAM/Shimano compatible hub. Seller says that a spacer is included in case buyer wants to use with a 10-speed cassette. I've not done much research into 11-speed systems, so not familar with specs. Is it common/ok to use an "11-speed" hub with a 10-speed cassette? Assuming use of proper spacer, of course. Downsides?

    Generally speaking 11s hubs build to weaker wheels than 10s hubs due to their flange offset, all else kept equal. There are exceptions though, so each case its best to be analyzed separately.

    Would this "weakness" be perceptible to the rider?

    It depends. It depends on the forces the wheel is subjected to (rider weight and riding style), it depends on the number and type of spokes, it depends on the rim selection and maybe to a considerably smaller degree on the lacing chosen(certain lacing patterns result to higher tension ratios).

    Typically, the lesser the rider weight and the lesser the rider output, the less one has to worry about this. The higher the rider weight and the higher the rider output, the more hub, rim and spoke selection become paramount in safeguarding the integrity of the wheel.