• 11-22-2014
    FullRageAce
    2x lace wheel set build (1st build, beginner)
    I needed a set of wheels for my 1st road bike (which I am also building). After consideration from some forum members, I ended up buying the parts to build my own wheels from Brandon at bikehubstore (BHS)

    I am going to be using a 2x lace pattern on both front and back.

    Here is the list of whats going into the build:

    RIMS:
    BHS C472w Clincher Rim - 23mm wide - 28mm deep - 472g-482g - Black - 24 Holes
    $54.95

    BHS C472w Clincher Rim - 23mm wide - 28mm deep - 472g-482g - Black - 28 Holes
    $54.95

    HUBS:
    SL210 SuperLight Rear Hub - 28 Holes - White - Shimano 10/11
    $84.95

    UltraLight Front Road Hub - 66 grams - White - 24 Holes
    $54.95

    SPOKES:
    Sapim Race - Black - 282
    16 $0.90 $14.40

    Sapim Race - Black - 286
    26 $0.90 $23.40

    Sapim Race - Black - 278
    16 $0.90 $14.40

    HARDWARE:
    Titanium Quick Release Skewer - 43.5 grams - BLACK
    $36.95

    Sapim 14mm Aluminum Alloy Poly-Ax Nipples -14G - Black
    55 $0.40 $22.00

    Round PolyAx (HM) Washers (20 pieces x3)
    $2.95 $8.85

    After building up on the rims, I would recommend a first wheel build on a standard rim with NO hollow section. The ones I choose have the section and it will test your patience once a couple nipples and washers come lose (and they will). Its really not a big deal but if you aren't a patient person then you will not be too happy.
  • 11-22-2014
    FullRageAce
    I am going to start with the front wheel first. Here is what I have to start with:
    https://i57.tinypic.com/169oirp.jpg
    front rim, hub, washers, nipples, spokes and some PT antiseize.

    Here is the first set of spokes going in each side, I choose to start the "key spoke" on the left side of the valve hole. The hub has no logo so its not really relevant but still serves as a starting point.

    https://i62.tinypic.com/29y1l4z.jpg

    Oh forgot i needed a nipple driver, just picked up the philips and a small bastard file from the hws for $8.
    https://i60.tinypic.com/22ytsw.jpg
    Fit nicely into the nipples, 3mm tip so I don't over tighten.

    Heres what it looks like after lacing all the spokes:
    https://i60.tinypic.com/5x0ocl.jpg
    seems to be right, looks a little different from some other rims with 2x lace though but i assume this is because you can choose different styles and starting points.

    Finished lacing the rear wheel as well:
    https://i58.tinypic.com/sq2lie.jpg

    I tightened each nipple down flush with the threads, then hand tensioned each spoke.
  • 11-22-2014
    Mike T.
    Cool. Let us know how you make out.
  • 11-22-2014
    ericm979
    I found those rims build up pretty easily. Though they are deep enough that it can be difficult to get nipples started.

    I made a nipple instertion tool out of an old spoke and nipple. Thread the nipple on so there's about 3mm of threads sticking out and use Loctite to keep it in place. Cut the spoke and make a handle out of the end. Thicker spokes work better for this.

    To use it thread a nipple on thick end first. Then insert the tool with the nipple on it into the rim and thread the nipple on to the spoke. Pull on the spoke so the nipple seats in the rim and won't turn when you unscrew the tool.

    Use a dab of thick grease to hold the PolyAxe washer on the nipple.
  • 11-22-2014
    Mike T.
    Use a sharpened Q-tip to hold the nipple and gravity to hold the washer.
  • 11-22-2014
    robt57
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    Use a sharpened Q-tip to hold the nipple and gravity to hold the washer.

    That sounds faster, going to try the Q-Tips as soon as my spokes get here for my sl25 build...

    I have a spoke about 5" with a few 90^ bend as a handle on the non threaded side and crazy glue on all but the last 5-6 threads.
  • 11-23-2014
    FullRageAce
    Its hard to get the nipples to stay on during the process, i've had one come off already while mid build, it was a pain to fish out from these hollow rims. I turn them about 4 times, as each nipple to spoke has its own feel and thus will not adhere to the threads with just the motion. Once I can feel its taken thread then I do the 4 turns (I am making sure to turn them the proper way)

    Here is a upclose of the hub and spokes I have, I am now going to rotate the hub/spokes counter clockwise and begin the next section of spoke to begin the "lace".
    https://i61.tinypic.com/m8ig6b.jpg

    assuming I am off to the right start so far. feel free to comment if I am messing up. I am trying to make a 2x lace pattern so it kinda makes sense to me but also seems easy to mess up.
  • 11-23-2014
    cxwrench
    We can't comment because we can't see the rim and how the hub/spokes are oriented to the rim. It looks ok from this pic, but who knows? This really isn't very hard once you know what to do. Should only take 15mins or so for you to completely lace the spokes. Adding tension and keeping it straight/round will be another issue. Have fun.
  • 11-23-2014
    Mike T.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by FullRageAce View Post
    I am now going to rotate the hub/spokes counter clockwise and begin the next section of spoke to begin the "lace".
    I am trying to make a 2x lace pattern so it kinda makes sense to me but also seems easy to mess up.

    To make sure you're turning the hub the correct way (and there IS a wrong way) make sure the spoke nearest the valve hole will be parallel to an imaginary valve coming through the hole and not crossing in front of the valve. That way, the valve will be between two parallel spokes - just where it's supposed to be. Check that all your spoke crosses are correct before applying tension.
  • 11-23-2014
    FullRageAce
    Alright, front wheel is done, i think.
    No tension, truing, dishing, etc...yet. Just want to get the lace up right at least.The
    valve is at the bottom marked with a piece of blue masking tape.

    I drove the nipples flush, hand tensioned the spokes. I will wait until I either make/order a truing stand to finish the truing and final tension.

    Now for the rear wheel.
  • 11-25-2014
    Aladin
    "After building up on the rims, I would recommend a first wheel build on a standard rim with NO hollow section. The ones I choose have the section and it will test your patience once a couple nipples and washers come lose (and they will). Its really not a big deal but if you aren't a patient person then you will not be too happy." writes the OP.

    Typical of a first timer... double wall rims simply are much stronger than SW's. The reason we build our own is to the LAST.. DW's do that.
    :thumbsup:
  • 11-25-2014
    Mike T.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by FullRageAce View Post
    I will wait until I either make/order a truing stand to finish the truing and final tension.

    Use the fork & frame.
  • 11-25-2014
    CliffordK
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by FullRageAce View Post
    After building up on the rims, I would recommend a first wheel build on a standard rim with NO hollow section.

    Almost all modern "road" rims have the hollow section. You still find a few cheap MTB rims without it. Fish out a couple of nipple washers, and you'll quickly develop a method not to drop them inside.

    The nipple washers are a bit of a pain, so one might consider building the wheel without them.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by FullRageAce View Post
    I will wait until I either make/order a truing stand to finish the truing and final tension.

    Use the fork & frame.

    You can hold a pencil, pen, or bic razor as a reference point for truing while you spin the wheel. Perhaps not the most advanced method, but it works. I suppose the brakes can be used too, but I like something that gives a good squeak or whistle when it touches the rim.
  • 11-25-2014
    Mike T.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
    You can hold a pencil, pen, or bic razor as a reference point for truing while you spin the wheel. Perhaps not the most advanced method, but it works. I suppose the brakes can be used too, but I like something that gives a good squeak or whistle when it touches the rim.

    I've used brake pads, a screwdriver (my fave), my thumb (my close 2nd fave) and a dial indicator (my least fave) as an indicator and IMO they are are all as accurate and as fast. With the thumb you have a tactile indicator which NO commercial unit can match. Using the thumb, a blind & deaf person could true a wheel.
  • 11-25-2014
    FullRageAce
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Aladin View Post

    Typical of a first timer... double wall rims simply are much stronger than SW's. The reason we build our own is to the LAST.. DW's do that.
    :thumbsup:

    You're right, its really not a big deal i think with the multitasking and me not know exactly what I was doing made it seem tougher than it was. Once I started lacing the rear wheel I got a much better feel for threading the nipples on solid.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    Use the fork & frame.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
    You can hold a pencil, pen, or bic razor as a reference point for truing while you spin the wheel. Perhaps not the most advanced method, but it works. I suppose the brakes can be used too, but I like something that gives a good squeak or whistle when it touches the rim.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    I've used brake pads, a screwdriver (my fave), my thumb (my close 2nd fave) and a dial indicator (my least fave) as an indicator and IMO they are are all as accurate and as fast. With the thumb you have a tactile indicator which NO commercial unit can match. Using the thumb, a blind & deaf person could true a wheel.

    I am going to try the suggestions, i've been reading up on to many sites that stress using every modern made wheel tuning tool. I'll give it a shot once my frame and forks come in, the shipping is taking forever. I might build a stand if I have some free time. I am busy with work and trying to get ride of one of my cars.
    Frame/fork should be here in a week.
  • 11-25-2014
    CliffordK
    1 Attachment(s)
    Here is the truing stand that Dad made... perhaps 40 years ago.

    Attachment 302048

    I don't think he planned on front and rear wheels being different widths, but there is enough flex in the stand that one can generally get the different hubs into the stand.

    I suppose "true" is true within some tolerance. I think I generally get it to less than +/- 1mm or so with both hop and side to side, although I think I can get it a bit better if I have enough patience.

    I'm planning on making a little more robust stand in the next month or so, but this old stand has served me well for many years.

    If you do search for commercial stands, Park is the gold standard for small shops, but you could probably get away with some of cheaper more portable varieties.