broken eyelet on rim
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  1. #1
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    broken eyelet on rim

    I noticed something on one of the spokes on my rear wheel and realized that the eyelet had broken on the rim. The top half slid down the spoke and rattles around when the bike is moving. Can you see any reason why I would need to have the eyelet replaced? Or can I just cut it off and go without an eyelet on that spoke? The rims are Mavic Open Pros, 32 hole.

  2. #2
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    Each eyelet is there to spread the force from the nipple over a greater surface area in your rim so the spoke hole won't fail in that spot. With 32 spokes, if one spoke does fail, you might actually be able to get back from a ride without walking, if your wheel has been built properly. If I had an eyelet fail, I'd first try to see if I could get it replaced, and if not, I'd rebuild the wheel with a new rim and spokes.
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  3. #3
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    Over worried

    Quote Originally Posted by 4slomo
    Each eyelet is there to spread the force from the nipple over a greater surface area in your rim so the spoke hole won't fail in that spot. With 32 spokes, if one spoke does fail, you might actually be able to get back from a ride without walking, if your wheel has been built properly. If I had an eyelet fail, I'd first try to see if I could get it replaced, and if not, I'd rebuild the wheel with a new rim and spokes.
    What most likely has happened to the OP's wheel is that the "outer" part of the eyely has cracked off. The inner part is what spreads the force to the rim surface, and it is still in place. The outer part is just a small crimp of metal that holds the eyelet firmly on the rim. If the tire, rim strip, and spoke was removed, that would allow the inner part of the eyelet to fall out, but otherwise there is probably nothing to worry about.

  4. #4
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    nope. its an easy fix... go to a hardware store and buy 5/32" brass washers... remove the nipple, use the washers as an anchor, reinstall spoke - good to go.

    executed this fix before, works like a charm.

    *** nevermind, brain melt... OP is a dbl eyelet, if the spoke tension is good, its fine... fix above is re: single eyelet which means such a failure = no spoke tension..

  5. #5
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    The rim does have double eyelets, so the inner part of the eyelet is still in place. Guess I'll just keep an "eye" on it for now. Does anyone know if you can get replacement eyelets for Mavic rims?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tarwheel2
    The rim does have double eyelets, so the inner part of the eyelet is still in place. Guess I'll just keep an "eye" on it for now. Does anyone know if you can get replacement eyelets for Mavic rims?

    No you can't get eyelets from mavic. I wouldn't worry too much. The important part of the eyelet, the part that contacts the nipple, is still intact.

  7. #7
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    From the Mavic Dealer's Technical Manual, Conditions of use of a rim:

    • Choose a suitable wheel designed for the type of riding you wish to do;
    • It is imperative to respect the instructions in the Technical Manual for tire pressure and sizes (see charts page 14);
    • Respect the appropriate spoke tensions.
    • Clean the rims on a regular basis with the Mavic soft stone (M40410);
    • Remove stones and metal particles from the brake pads;
    • Replace the brake pads when they are worn;
    • Do not use a rim if the braking surfaces are worn, if eyelets are missing, or in any other case where safety might be compromised. The rim is a part that
    wears out as do brake pads, and must be replaced if it is worn (sidewall hollowed by wear, or cut out, cracked rim…);
    • Check or have your rims checked on a regular basis, at least at the start of each season and if possible after intensive use should you have a doubt about
    spoke tensions or the type of tire used. When checking, look inside (especially under the rim tape) and outside the rim. Check for signs of fatigue or wear:
    deterioration of braking surfaces, cracks in the sidewalls or around the eyelets.
    Following these recommendations will guarantee longer product life for the wheels, maximum performance and riding enjoyment.
    Hey everybody, ride my wheels! They ride good, real good.
    I'm a wheel builder. SRLPE Wheel Works. Send me a PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4slomo
    From the Mavic Dealer's Technical Manual, Conditions of use of a rim:

    • Choose a suitable wheel designed for the type of riding you wish to do;
    • It is imperative to respect the instructions in the Technical Manual for tire pressure and sizes (see charts page 14);
    • Respect the appropriate spoke tensions.
    • Clean the rims on a regular basis with the Mavic soft stone (M40410);
    • Remove stones and metal particles from the brake pads;
    • Replace the brake pads when they are worn;
    • Do not use a rim if the braking surfaces are worn, if eyelets are missing, or in any other case where safety might be compromised. The rim is a part that
    wears out as do brake pads, and must be replaced if it is worn (sidewall hollowed by wear, or cut out, cracked rim…);
    • Check or have your rims checked on a regular basis, at least at the start of each season and if possible after intensive use should you have a doubt about
    spoke tensions or the type of tire used. When checking, look inside (especially under the rim tape) and outside the rim. Check for signs of fatigue or wear:
    deterioration of braking surfaces, cracks in the sidewalls or around the eyelets.
    Following these recommendations will guarantee longer product life for the wheels, maximum performance and riding enjoyment.
    Well you would kind of expect them to say that to keep the laywers happy. But for this situation the worst that's likely to happen is that he won't be able to keep the wheel true. One thing I would definitely do though is have a look inside the rim. I don't know what the inside of that rim looks like but if it's a double wall construction there may be another load spreading thingy that bridges between the two sections. When my eyelet popped it was actuall due to that thingy inside the rim cracking causing the eyelet to pop. Unfortunatley for me there was really no way to fix it other than replacing the rim.

  9. #9
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    Well this helps me decide what rims to buy for my touring wheels. I've used Mavic wheels for years, but I don't like the fact that a rim with a relatively minor problem apparently can't be fixed. My choices for touring rims were narrowed down to Mavic A719s or Velocity Dyads. They both get high ratings for a durable rim, but the Dyads don't have eyelets and A719s do. So it looks like I'll go for the Velocity rims, assuming they are available. Last time I checked, supplies appeared to be very limited.

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