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  1. #1
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    broken front wheel

    I'm trying to repair the front wheel on my son's old childhood bike. I think the front hub is missing some of its pieces and is very loose. I removed the quick release skewer and tried to tighten the nuts on either side, but I can't seem to tighten it enough, as the wheel still wobbles on the hub. I think I need a new axle. Can someone link me the correct part to buy, from ebay or amazon? It is a Weimann 519 rim. Front wheel. Size 24"x1.5"

    If it matters, the bike is a 21 speed Schwinn Speedster, probably from around the year 2000 or so.
    Thanks

    Tom

  2. #2
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tpcorr View Post
    I'm trying to repair the front wheel on my son's old childhood bike. I think the front hub is missing some of its pieces and is very loose. I removed the quick release skewer and tried to tighten the nuts on either side, but I can't seem to tighten it enough, as the wheel still wobbles on the hub. I think I need a new axle. Can someone link me the correct part to buy, from ebay or amazon? It is a Weimann 519 rim. Front wheel. Size 24"x1.5"

    If it matters, the bike is a 21 speed Schwinn Speedster, probably from around the year 2000 or so.
    Thanks

    Tom
    Go to a bike shop.
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  3. #3
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    pics might help.

    you only need a new axle if it is broken or bent.

    you need park tool cone wrenches to adjust a hub. one of the correct size (13mm?) will usually work in conjunction with an adjustable wrench.

    see the park tool website and youtube for great instruction.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  4. #4
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    From your post, it's obvious that you don't have a clue what you are doing. Take it to a bike shop before you ruin it. Or just buy an entire new wheel. The stuff you are mentioning is pretty much bottom-end components, so you should be able to buy an entire new wheel for less than $50.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the bike shop advice, but I'd like to try to fix it myself. As I said earlier, I think some of the parts are missing because I can't find the cone nuts. When this problem first occurred, my sons tried to fix it themselves and since they were young I'm sure they misplaced some of the pieces. If getting a new wheel for fifty bucks is the only option, I'll just give it away. But if I can buy the parts to repair it, I'd like to go that route.

    Tom

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    you only need a new axle if it is broken or bent.
    Not necessarily. If axle threads are rusted, they can strip quite easily if you try to tighten. I had this happen with an older Cannondale mountain bike. Hubs were low end Shimano. Axle was toast.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  7. #7
    Adorable Furry Hombre
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    Quote Originally Posted by tpcorr View Post
    Thanks for the bike shop advice, but I'd like to try to fix it myself. As I said earlier, I think some of the parts are missing because I can't find the cone nuts. When this problem first occurred, my sons tried to fix it themselves and since they were young I'm sure they misplaced some of the pieces. If getting a new wheel for fifty bucks is the only option, I'll just give it away. But if I can buy the parts to repair it, I'd like to go that route.

    Tom

    Not the only option....but between needing the right tools and parts, a new wheel is the economical option more than likely. Not knowing what this hub is, what exactly has fallen off/out (I'm guessing you're needing new ball bearings) or what has worn (the races may well be shot) etc....we're left to play 400 questions, and for you to get frustrated needing to guess/answer what we mean.


    The shortest solve is to take the wheel to a shop or co-op. They'll known at sight in a couple minutes what the best course of action is. A co-op they can even tutor you on how to do it.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  8. #8
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    Your story is much to vague for anyone to help. There are too many variables. There is so much you need to know. Do what cx suggested.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Not necessarily.
    to me, a "broken axle" is one that is in pieces or the threads are botched.

    Quote Originally Posted by tpcorr View Post
    I can't find the cone nuts.
    tom, this helps a great deal. now we know the problem. you can't find the two cones that fit into the bearings on each side of the hub on the axle.

    search google maps for a bike co-op in your area, take the wheel there, and ask if they have a bin of used hubs and some help. you might be able to find what you're looking for. but it might also take an hour or more.

    i have only done it that way once. usually, i end up just replacing the hub parts with used stuff from ebay. ebay makes it easy to find the exact hub/hub parts. but it's not dirt cheap like the co-op.

    a bike shop should be able to tell you the axle diameter and exact threading if you want to merely search for cones on ebay. but i would not suggest buying cones not specific to your hub, even if they perfectly thread onto your axle.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Take it to a bike shop before you ruin it.
    how can you ruin it? it's an old bike. you work on it until it works. then you ride it. if it doesn't work after you've worked on it, take it to someone who knows how to fix it. you can't ruin it unless you ride it off a cliff. bikes are not difficult to work on at all.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    how can you ruin it? it's an old bike. you work on it until it works. then you ride it. if it doesn't work after you've worked on it, take it to someone who knows how to fix it. you can't ruin it unless you ride it off a cliff. bikes are not difficult to work on at all.
    Thanks blackfrancois. That's how I feel about it too. I hope to be able to identify the hub and get the internal parts to fix it. Still having coffee. Late night last night

  12. #12
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    Bring the wheel to a shop and ask if they have the parts needed, probably cones, lock nuts, washers and bearings. Buy the parts and some cone wrenches and have at it. Automotive grease will work.

    Since your kids tried to fix things themselves sit down with them and have at it. Park Tools or youtube will have tutorials.
    Too old to ride plastic

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    how can you ruin it? it's an old bike. you work on it until it works. then you ride it. if it doesn't work after you've worked on it, take it to someone who knows how to fix it. you can't ruin it unless you ride it off a cliff. bikes are not difficult to work on at all.
    Well, as for this particular poster, I can imagine if he manages to "brinnel" the bearing races, this wheel is ruined for him because I don't see him rebuilding the wheel with a new hub. His threshold of expected labor needed seems low, and anything beyond finding the correct cone and bearings seems to be all he needs to declare it junk, which is essentially 'ruined' in this example. You and I wouldn't have a problem doing such a repair, but we aren't flummoxed by easy repairs, either.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  14. #14
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    Even if you could find someone online selling misc. parts for whatever hub that wheel has, you would likely pay more for the parts and shipping than the wheel is worth.

    As others have mentioned, your local shop or bike co-op is your best option for parts. They can put eyes on it and tell you exactly what parts you need and where to get them.

    They might also find that there are other potential issues with the wheel that may need to be addressed before you let someone ride it.

    There are some good YouTube channels that might be of done help. 'RJ the Bike Guy' has a ton of how to videos showing how to do the type of thing you are trying to do.

  15. #15
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tpcorr View Post
    Thanks blackfrancois. That's how I feel about it too. I hope to be able to identify the hub and get the internal parts to fix it. Still having coffee. Late night last night
    Do you even know what kind of hub you have? Axle size/thread pitch? What type of cones you need? Size of the balls? Do you know any of this?
    I work for some bike racers
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    and a bunch of skateboards

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Well, as for this particular poster, I can imagine if he manages to "brinnel" the bearing races, this wheel is ruined for him because I don't see him rebuilding the wheel with a new hub. His threshold of expected labor needed seems low, and anything beyond finding the correct cone and bearings seems to be all he needs to declare it junk, which is essentially 'ruined' in this example. You and I wouldn't have a problem doing such a repair, but we aren't flummoxed by easy repairs, either.
    it's not hard. you buy a park cone wrench for $5. you use another wrench already in your tool box. you watch a couple videos. and then you spend two hours doing it for the first time.

    if he's "flummoxed," it's because he hasn't done it before. i was in the same boat once, and i thought i was over my head. but then i read sheldon brown and figured it out.

    you need to be more helpful to people. there's nothing smart or interesting about how you continue to troll.
    Last edited by blackfrancois; 09-03-2018 at 07:30 PM.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Do you even know what kind of hub you have? Axle size/thread pitch? What type of cones you need? Size of the balls? Do you know any of this?
    one lbs in my area has a display in the repair shop convenient for the public that has several different axles and their specifics (diameter and thread pitch). anyone can take a nut, try it on the different axles to determine the axle or parts needed.

    the search function on the velobase site is a good resource to determine ball size and count. i use it often, 'cause used hubs often don't have the correct build. i've run into several recently that are a ball short on each side. i have no idea why this is...
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    There are some good YouTube channels that might be of done help. 'RJ the Bike Guy' has a ton of how to videos showing how to do the type of thing you are trying to do.
    i like that guy -- he often tries hard -- but he's a huge hack. and sometimes, he's flat out wrong.

    park has awesome videos on youtube. and they are exacting.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  19. #19
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    Thanks for the encouragement and advice. I have 2 cone wrenches and have serviced the hubs on mine and my wife's bikes in the past. I just never needed to figure out which parts were missing before. Anyway, after closer inspection the lock nuts were in place, but no spacers, cones, or ball bearings.

    My older son had saved the cones and a few of the ball bearings, as well as the washers. The cups looked okay as did the axle. I had a bunch of 3/16" ball bearings that seemed to match the few that my son salvaged. I hadn't realized he kept the leftover parts in a baggie in the shed.

    Anyway, we packed some grease into the cups, added the ball bearings, adjusted the cones, and after some trial and error had the wheel spinning freely once mounted in the fork. Good time for my son and I.

    Thanks for the encouragement velodog, Finx, and balckfrancois. Toulouse and cxwrench, I know you guys were trying to help but maybe you should lighten up a bit.

    Tom

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    i like that guy -- he often tries hard -- but he's a huge hack. and sometimes, he's flat out wrong.

    park has awesome videos on youtube. and they are exacting.
    Art's Cyclery has really good videos as well as Park. I would trust either Art's or Park. But there are many hacks on You Tube. Choose carefully.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  21. #21
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    Classic forum thread.

    1. OP asks a vague question that cannot be answered.
    2. Knowledgeable people say - take it to a professional b/c OP doesn't even know what he is asking.
    3. OP answers own question with information left out of OP.
    4. OP gives finger to said knowledgeable people.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    Classic forum thread.

    1. OP asks a vague question that cannot be answered.
    2. Knowledgeable people say - take it to a professional b/c OP doesn't even know what he is asking.
    3. OP answers own question with information left out of OP.
    4. OP gives finger to said knowledgeable people.
    Yeah I noticed all that too. CX gives probably the best advice (as he's a mechanic and he's seen and heard it all before, many times) and the OP tells him (and others) to lighten up! That's gratitude for ya eh?
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    Classic forum thread.

    1. OP asks a vague question that cannot be answered.
    2. Knowledgeable people say - take it to a professional b/c OP doesn't even know what he is asking.
    3. OP answers own question with information left out of OP.
    4. OP gives finger to said knowledgeable people.
    Not giving the finger to anyone. Info left out of the op was because I didn't have the info that my son had some of the missing parts. Just trying to get some help from those in the know crit boy. Why so toxic?

  24. #24
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tpcorr View Post
    Not giving the finger to anyone. Info left out of the op was because I didn't have the info that my son had some of the missing parts. Just trying to get some help from those in the know crit boy. Why so toxic?
    'Toxic' ? At the time I posted we had no idea that you had the parts. If you didn't have the parts there is NO way anyone here could tell you what you needed given the lack of hub brand/model or some photos. And I should lighten up? Please...as a couple other posters said I gave the only good advice in the thread.
    I work for some bike racers
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by tpcorr View Post
    Thanks for the encouragement and advice. I have 2 cone wrenches and have serviced the hubs on mine and my wife's bikes in the past. I just never needed to figure out which parts were missing before. Anyway, after closer inspection the lock nuts were in place, but no spacers, cones, or ball bearings.

    My older son had saved the cones and a few of the ball bearings, as well as the washers. The cups looked okay as did the axle. I had a bunch of 3/16" ball bearings that seemed to match the few that my son salvaged. I hadn't realized he kept the leftover parts in a baggie in the shed.

    Anyway, we packed some grease into the cups, added the ball bearings, adjusted the cones, and after some trial and error had the wheel spinning freely once mounted in the fork. Good time for my son and I.

    Tom
    I'm glad you got it fixed, though I'm a little puzzled that someone who had previously serviced hubs wouldn't notice immediately that essentially all of the crucial parts of the bearing assembly were absent. But anyway, happy rolling to your son.
    Have you ever been to Electric Ladyland?

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