• 08-20-2019
    sramred
    Cannondale Hollowgram SI Disc Wheels - bearings
    Are Hollowgram SI Disc Wheels Cup and Cone or Cartridge?
  • 08-20-2019
    cxwrench
    I'm guessing they're made by Stan's so they're most likely cartridge. Very very few hubs are cup/cone these days. Shimano and Campy are the only 2 that come to mind and Campy aren't loose balls, they're in retainers.
  • 08-20-2019
    sramred
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I'm guessing they're made by Stan's so they're most likely cartridge. Very very few hubs are cup/cone these days. Shimano and Campy are the only 2 that come to mind and Campy aren't loose balls, they're in retainers.

    i thought the <2017 Hollowgram Rims were made by Stans? Mine: https://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/Bi...ntid=undefined

    2018 model, doesn't show the Stans name anywhere listed on the Rim, nevertheless anything related to the Hubs....
  • 08-20-2019
    cxwrench
    Why don't you just take a look?
  • 08-21-2019
    Jay Strongbow
    For what it's worth I have very roughly 80,000 miles split about evenly between Dura Ace (cup and cone) and a couple others that are cartridge and have yet to come across a reason I would care which they were.
  • 08-23-2019
    sramred
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Why don't you just take a look?

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    For what it's worth I have very roughly 80,000 miles split about evenly between Dura Ace (cup and cone) and a couple others that are cartridge and have yet to come across a reason I would care which they were.

    The main reason why I was asking about the wheels bearings is because I spun the rear wheel while the bike was flipped. The wheel didn't spin as freely or for as long as any of my other wheels. My cousin mentioned to me that if the bearings were cup and cone, it's designed to have the riders weight on it and it will spin freely as I'm riding.

    Is this true?
  • 08-23-2019
    cxwrench
    1) Don't flip your bike over.

    2) Any bearing that has the proper amount of grease and/or is new will not spin forever because of grease drag. Has absolutely no impact on how it spins when you're riding. Doesn't matter whether it's loose ball (cup/cone) or cartridge. Grease fill has the same impact. Your cousin is more or less correct.

    3) Go ride your bike, don't overthink.
  • 08-23-2019
    tlg
    Ugh... so many people think how long your wheel spins is a meaningful metric of something. (it's not)
  • 08-23-2019
    Jay Strongbow
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sramred View Post
    My cousin mentioned to me that if the bearings were cup and cone, it's designed to have the riders weight on it and it will spin freely as I'm riding.

    Is this true?

    Close enough. Except at extremes how a wheel spins with no weight means nothing. And if a rear wheel spins forever that doesn't mean it's better than one that doesn't. Probably means it's worse in that there is not enough grease or the pre-load isn't enough.
  • 08-24-2019
    sramred
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I'm guessing they're made by Stan's so they're most likely cartridge. Very very few hubs are cup/cone these days. Shimano and Campy are the only 2 that come to mind and Campy aren't loose balls, they're in retainers.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    1) Don't flip your bike over.

    2) Any bearing that has the proper amount of grease and/or is new will not spin forever because of grease drag. Has absolutely no impact on how it spins when you're riding. Doesn't matter whether it's loose ball (cup/cone) or cartridge. Grease fill has the same impact. Your cousin is more or less correct.

    3) Go ride your bike, don't overthink.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Ugh... so many people think how long your wheel spins is a meaningful metric of something. (it's not)

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Close enough. Except at extremes how a wheel spins with no weight means nothing. And if a rear wheel spins forever that doesn't mean it's better than one that doesn't. Probably means it's worse in that there is not enough grease or the pre-load isn't enough.

    thanks for all the feedback!

    now, not that it really matters because my current wheels do spin well when i'm riding, how can anyone actually tell if their rear wheel bearings are better/worse than someone elses if theres a million+1 variables if you're both on the bike and riding it, and that spinning the wheel upside down tells nothing?
  • 08-24-2019
    tlg
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sramred View Post
    thanks for all the feedback!

    now, not that it really matters because my current wheels do spin well when i'm riding, how can anyone actually tell if their rear wheel bearings are better/worse than someone elses if theres a million+1 variables

    They can't. The watts consumed by wheel bearings is so miniscule, it's hard to measure even with sophisticated equipment.
  • 08-24-2019
    Jay Strongbow
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sramred View Post
    thanks for all the feedback!

    now, not that it really matters because my current wheels do spin well when i'm riding, how can anyone actually tell if their rear wheel bearings are better/worse than someone elses if theres a million+1 variables if you're both on the bike and riding it, and that spinning the wheel upside down tells nothing?

    You could bring them to MIT and fund a study perhaps. Lot of time and trouble to learn what everyone already knows though and that's that bearings don't really matter assuming they are adjusted and functioning.

    If you're interested in this stuff as science that's fine and dandy. If you're interested as a bicycle rider you are wasting your time.