Faster wheels for bigger riders
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  1. #1
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    Faster wheels for bigger riders

    Hey all...

    Another thread had be thinking I should ask about this for myself. Anyone have any good ideas for a good set of wheels for a bigger guy? I'm your typical o-line build...6', 250# and about the shape of a brick wall and am looking to eventually replace the stockers on my ride.

    I've touched base with ROL and they referred me to PWB, where I came up with a Kinlin XR300 rim (24/28), Sapim CXray and American classic (Micro 58 / 205) hubs that they say should work out well for my size and weigh a little less than 1500g.

    Anyone have any other suggestions for someone built like a tank who wants a quick ride?

    Cheers
    So 10 times wasn't enough and I'm going back again:my participant page for the 2019 Alberta Ride to Conquer Cancer.

    18 Bowman Palace:R, 09 Knolly Delirium T, ?? Mercury Road Bike, signed '06 Gary Fisher Cake 2DLX, 12 Cervelo S2 (frame to be repaired)

  2. #2
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    I'm not sure that the Am Classic hubs will be the best option for someone at your weight. Maybe take a look at the Alchemy ELF/ORC. They have wider flange spacing than the Ams which will make the build be a bit more rigid from a lateral aspect.
    With regards to the rims, it think your making a good choice with the XR300. That is an uber stiff rim and it should easily be enough for your weight.

  3. #3
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    XR300 would be a good rim choice, as would the XR270. DT Swiss rims are also great to build with. Check them out. 250lbs = 32 hole rims, at least.

    At 250 lbs, Shimano hubs and Sapim Race spokes would weigh a little more, for a lot less money ... and I don't think you would notice a difference in performance. Seriously.

    Just my opinion, but I would focus more on durability than weight, since most light bike parts are designed for the typical 150-180 lb rider. If you ride on some pot hole infested northern roads (like I do), it becomes even more of an issue.

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    Quote Originally Posted by morgan1819 View Post
    XR300 would be a good rim choice, as would the XR270. DT Swiss rims are also great to build with. Check them out. 250lbs = 32 hole rims, at least.

    At 250 lbs, Shimano hubs and Sapim Race spokes would weigh a little more, for a lot less money ... and I don't think you would notice a difference in performance. Seriously.

    Just my opinion, but I would focus more on durability than weight, since most light bike parts are designed for the typical 150-180 lb rider. If you ride on some pot hole infested northern roads (like I do), it becomes even more of an issue.
    I agree with this. 32 spoke wheels with Shimano hubs and something like Velocity Synergy rims will be a very durable wheelset which I would choose over lower spoke count wheels, and they will also not be very expensive.
    Valley Cyclist Wheels www.valleycyclist.com

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by morgan1819 View Post
    XR300 would be a good rim choice, as would the XR270. DT Swiss rims are also great to build with. Check them out. 250lbs = 32 hole rims, at least.

    At 250 lbs, Shimano hubs and Sapim Race spokes would weigh a little more, for a lot less money ... and I don't think you would notice a difference in performance. Seriously.

    Just my opinion, but I would focus more on durability than weight, since most light bike parts are designed for the typical 150-180 lb rider. If you ride on some pot hole infested northern roads (like I do), it becomes even more of an issue.
    My only concern with Shimano stuff is the freehubs. My Cx bike was built up with Hope Pro III hubs because in climbing a short, moderately steep slope in the first 500 km on the bike, I literally stripped the internals of a Shimano freehub to scrap metal (granted, it was a 105 or Tiaga level hub).

    The stock Fulcrum Racing T's aren't bad and should be durable overall....but having built up my own wheels in the past and seeing what a difference 200+ g of rotating weight can make with the mtb (6.5" travel f/r bike where I use 32h Mavic 823's and Pro II's without issue) I wouldn't mind dropping some weight off the wheels.
    So 10 times wasn't enough and I'm going back again:my participant page for the 2019 Alberta Ride to Conquer Cancer.

    18 Bowman Palace:R, 09 Knolly Delirium T, ?? Mercury Road Bike, signed '06 Gary Fisher Cake 2DLX, 12 Cervelo S2 (frame to be repaired)

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MercRidnMike View Post
    My only concern with Shimano stuff is the freehubs. My Cx bike was built up with Hope Pro III hubs because in climbing a short, moderately steep slope in the first 500 km on the bike, I literally stripped the internals of a Shimano freehub to scrap metal (granted, it was a 105 or Tiaga level hub).

    The stock Fulcrum Racing T's aren't bad and should be durable overall....but having built up my own wheels in the past and seeing what a difference 200+ g of rotating weight can make with the mtb (6.5" travel f/r bike where I use 32h Mavic 823's and Pro II's without issue) I wouldn't mind dropping some weight off the wheels.
    November Bikes has some wheels that have higher weight limits while still maintaining a decent weight. Their alloy wheelset has A23 rims with Novatec hubs, 28F, 32R under 1600 grams. They also have a 85mm carbon clincher set with a high weight limit. Most people would stay away from tall aero wheels as daily riders due to cross wind issues, but if you can muscle the bike in a straight line, they might be for you.
    Retired sailor

  7. #7
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    My other option here is to rebuild a set of wheels I already have. As you may or may not know, I had a crash in August so I am faced with rebuilding a front and truing a rear wheel anyway...

    So my other thought would be to re-build the wheels on my Pro III hubs (32f/36r) using Kinlin XR300s, Sapim CXray spokes and DT Prolock alloy nips. If I build up 2X f and 3x r, I'm probably looking at a wheelset in the ~1630g range which would shed almost 300 g off from the stockers.

    Only drawback (if you'd call it that) would be the loud freehub....I don't know how they'd be received when I start to get into some group rides.

    I'm thinking 32/36 would be plenty strong and almost 3/4 a lb would do wonders for the snappiness of the bike.
    So 10 times wasn't enough and I'm going back again:my participant page for the 2019 Alberta Ride to Conquer Cancer.

    18 Bowman Palace:R, 09 Knolly Delirium T, ?? Mercury Road Bike, signed '06 Gary Fisher Cake 2DLX, 12 Cervelo S2 (frame to be repaired)

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    for about $40 more then the November Bike A23, you can get them WI hubs and CX ray spokes from Prowheelbuilder.com

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    I'm a big guy too. 6' 235. Just getting into raod riding and using a set of 105 hubs laced to some no name rims. 32 spokes front and rear. Everytime I corner hard I can hear the back brake rubbing while I am in the turn. Is this wheel flex or possibly the frame?

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    Quote Originally Posted by pilotman520 View Post
    I'm a big guy too. 6' 235. Just getting into raod riding and using a set of 105 hubs laced to some no name rims. 32 spokes front and rear. Everytime I corner hard I can hear the back brake rubbing while I am in the turn. Is this wheel flex or possibly the frame?
    It could be the frame, but I think that is unlikely. Sounds like your getting some lateral flex out of that rear wheel. I assume that you also see it when your going up a steeper grade as well? Must be pretty bad if you can feel rub in the corners.
    What is the tension on the rear wheel (drive side in particular)?

  11. #11
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    No idea on the tension. Should it be different than the non drive side? Never noticed it on the climbs but definately in the turns. Can't feel it so much as hear it. Like I said I am a mountain biker just getting into the road side so not much knowledge technically. If it is flex is it a problem? I don't want a wheel to fail me as i am cornering down a hill or something.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pilotman520 View Post
    I'm a big guy too. 6' 235. Just getting into raod riding and using a set of 105 hubs laced to some no name rims. 32 spokes front and rear. Everytime I corner hard I can hear the back brake rubbing while I am in the turn. Is this wheel flex or possibly the frame?
    What is the depth of those rims. If they are a lower profile rim, you might need somthing deeper and beefier. Also I have read here that most factory built wheels are built a bit loose. Maybe you should take them to the LBS and have the spoke tension checked like Zen was saying.

  13. #13
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    @pilotman- The tension between the drive side and non drive side will be quite a bit different from each other. With regards to the flex, you could keep riding it, but chances are your going to start breaking spokes at some point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zen Cyclery View Post
    @pilotman- The tension between the drive side and non drive side will be quite a bit different from each other. With regards to the flex, you could keep riding it, but chances are your going to start breaking spokes at some point.
    Not to mention that if you are getting rubbing of the tire on the frame, it'll start to eat away at the finish where it is rubbing.
    So 10 times wasn't enough and I'm going back again:my participant page for the 2019 Alberta Ride to Conquer Cancer.

    18 Bowman Palace:R, 09 Knolly Delirium T, ?? Mercury Road Bike, signed '06 Gary Fisher Cake 2DLX, 12 Cervelo S2 (frame to be repaired)

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    I am 6’2” and down to 265. I have had enough wheel problems over the years that I don’t fool around any more. The wheels on my reasonably fast bike are White Industries hubs, 135mm rear, with Velocity Deep V rims and 40 spokes front and rear. They are currently wearing Grande Bois 700x28c tires. The setup seems nicely fast to me, but what do I know. I used to race, but that was 35 yrs. Ago.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemY View Post
    I am 6’2” and down to 265. I have had enough wheel problems over the years that I don’t fool around any more. The wheels on my reasonably fast bike are White Industries hubs, 135mm rear, with Velocity Deep V rims and 40 spokes front and rear. They are currently wearing Grande Bois 700x28c tires. The setup seems nicely fast to me, but what do I know. I used to race, but that was 35 yrs. Ago.
    Sounds like the perfect build for you. The Deep V is an underrated rim that does great for us bigger guys.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zen Cyclery View Post
    Sounds like the perfect build for you. The Deep V is an underrated rim that does great for us bigger guys.
    In to so-called "Good Ol' Days" with Super Champion 58 rims, I had to go to 48 spokes to stabilize things to prevent dinged rims or broken spokes. The rims were fairly shallow and somewhat soft, so they were fairly flexable. The newer rims, like the Velocity Deep V, is very deep in section. A little heavy, but very stiff. Reduces the number of spokes required. I could probably get by with 36 but I am just paranoid.

  18. #18
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    Anyone have any thoughts about the Fulcrum Racing 3 / Campy Zonda sets for bigger guys? I would be at their upper weight limit, but the Zondas look like they might fit the bill at a reasonable price (about what it would cost to do a build on the Pro III hubs I have).
    So 10 times wasn't enough and I'm going back again:my participant page for the 2019 Alberta Ride to Conquer Cancer.

    18 Bowman Palace:R, 09 Knolly Delirium T, ?? Mercury Road Bike, signed '06 Gary Fisher Cake 2DLX, 12 Cervelo S2 (frame to be repaired)

  19. #19
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    @MercRidnMike- I'm not too sure about the Fulcrums. You would be stuck with proprietary parts, which would suck if you broke a spoke. Additionally, I think that spoke count is a bit low to be considered practical especially if your a bigger guy.
    With regards to the Zonda, I like that they are a triplet style but paired spokes have never made much sense to me. Seems like a great way to ensure that you won't be able to ride home on a broken spoke.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MercRidnMike View Post
    Anyone have any thoughts about the Fulcrum Racing 3 / Campy Zonda sets for bigger guys? I would be at their upper weight limit, but the Zondas look like they might fit the bill at a reasonable price (about what it would cost to do a build on the Pro III hubs I have).
    I have the Fulcrum Racing 1 and I find it to be the stiffest of all wheels I have bought or built. It's a low count spoke wheel, which I typically veer away from but I bought it because it looks good with my Ti bike; each spoke though is about 1/4" wide. Unless you break one you should be fine, but if you do break one you are walking home. The hubs are pretty good too. They've been around for a while so you find replacement rims and spokes online. Check the UK online shops; I bought mine for $700.
    With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important.

  21. #21
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    @Zenn - the Fulcrums and the Campys are kissing cousins...just like the Pontiac Sunfire / Chevy Cobalt were. Essentially the same wheelset, just different names on them. Logically, the spoke count is a little low (16 radial front and 21 rear in a radial / crossed 3G configuration) but my stockers are similar, just a lot heavier...but Dcgriz is right, the spokes are pretty substantial.

    I know it'd be harder to get a replacement just walking in off the street, but Fulcrum and Campy are big names, so I should be able to get spares in a pretty decent amount of time and I can always throw my current wheels back in if I needed to bridge a couple days.

    Fulcrum comes right out and says 240# for the Racing 3's, Campy I had to dig a bit more to confirm, but it's the same.
    So 10 times wasn't enough and I'm going back again:my participant page for the 2019 Alberta Ride to Conquer Cancer.

    18 Bowman Palace:R, 09 Knolly Delirium T, ?? Mercury Road Bike, signed '06 Gary Fisher Cake 2DLX, 12 Cervelo S2 (frame to be repaired)

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    For an experiment, they added 1900g of water to a professional riders wheels and had him climb Alpe d' Huez, which is 16 miles and about 3500 feet of climbing.

    The 1900 grams added a little under a minute to the climb. Those 200g you're looking to save would shave about 7 seconds off that test. Just for the sake of it, double it and call it 14 seconds over 16 miles.

    Thats giving up a LOT of reasonable, durable parts for questionable parts and durability, just to save 14 seconds over a long climb. Road weight isnt quite the same as mountain bike weight and its been heavily studied, verified, and reported.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomH View Post
    For an experiment, they added 1900g of water to a professional riders wheels and had him climb Alpe d' Huez, which is 16 miles and about 3500 feet of climbing.

    The 1900 grams added a little under a minute to the climb. Those 200g you're looking to save would shave about 7 seconds off that test. Just for the sake of it, double it and call it 14 seconds over 16 miles.

    Thats giving up a LOT of reasonable, durable parts for questionable parts and durability, just to save 14 seconds over a long climb. Road weight isnt quite the same as mountain bike weight and its been heavily studied, verified, and reported.
    It certainly isn't mountain biking, Tom, where one tire can weigh as much as a road wheelset. I know that makes a huge difference where what I'm looking at is a fairly small difference.

    Once up to speed, I certainly agree with you, Tom...long distance on road a couple hundred grams won't make much difference. Around town with stop and go traffic, the occasional light to light sprint etc...it becomes a bit more noticable but it won't be anything you could measure without a stopwatch. Of course, there's also the weight weenie factor, the higher quality components to match a quality frame (why have Tiagra wheels on an Ultegra bike), vanity with how different wheelsets will look etc., etc.

    Yes, there is some vanity to this thread, but there is a reason I'm not asking "what's the lightest wheel a clyde can run." I'm trying to be realistic in terms of what will be a quality upgrade from a relatively heavy and low end stock wheelset (and heavier doesn't always mean stronger).
    So 10 times wasn't enough and I'm going back again:my participant page for the 2019 Alberta Ride to Conquer Cancer.

    18 Bowman Palace:R, 09 Knolly Delirium T, ?? Mercury Road Bike, signed '06 Gary Fisher Cake 2DLX, 12 Cervelo S2 (frame to be repaired)

  24. #24
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    While the weight limit may be 240lbs, it would appear that Fulcrum implicitly states that anyone over 180 is really riding on "borrowed time". In that sense, the 3's are probably no different than most other low spoke count wheels which just come out and suggest <180 range in lieu of posting the structural max and guiding down. no?

    "All Fulcrum wheels are constructed to meet the highest standards of resistance and durability. If you weigh over 109 kg/240 lbs we advise you not to use this product. Non compliance with this warning can damage the product irreversibly. If you weigh 82 kg/180 lbs or more, you must be especially vigilant and have your bicycle inspected more frequently (than someone weighing less than 82 kg/180 lbs). Check with your mechanic to discuss whether the wheels you selected are suitable for your use, and to determine the frequency of inspections. Using tires with a larger diameter and a frame that respects the standards will help to increase the lifetime of the wheels. "

  25. #25
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    9W9W, I do hear ya...the Zondas / Fulcrums happened to be in one of the LBS and they noted that the weight limit on them was pretty good.

    I'm currently investigating if the Sapim Lasers will be okay in a 32/36 build with my hubs and Deep V's (the XR300s don't come in a 36h). They are a pretty lightweight spoke, but have some pretty impressive strength..almost the same as the CXrays.

    I'm sure I'll come up with a final idea here in the not too distant future ;)
    So 10 times wasn't enough and I'm going back again:my participant page for the 2019 Alberta Ride to Conquer Cancer.

    18 Bowman Palace:R, 09 Knolly Delirium T, ?? Mercury Road Bike, signed '06 Gary Fisher Cake 2DLX, 12 Cervelo S2 (frame to be repaired)

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