I Made a Boo Boo
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Life Coach
    Reputation: Sully00's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    300

    I Made a Boo Boo

    Sneaky pothole on a hair pin turn after a downhill + rear wheel + big guy =

    I took it easy going home the last 2 miles after the flat change.
    Am I buying a new wheel or is it fixable?

    IMG_2386.jpg
    2013 Felt Z85 ~ Mavic Kysrium Elite S

  2. #2
    grizzly moderator
    Reputation: dcgriz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,714
    It may be salvageable. Take a pair of long jaw welding pliers (4" to 6" long) and SLOWLY and GRADUALLY pry the bend back to shape, inline with the rest of the rim.
    If you end up with a bump that causes shuddering when braking, follow the sequence on Mike T's page about correcting an uneven rim joint.
    With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    4,045
    If you can not feeling it while riding or braking, don't touch it.

    If you feel pulsating while braking, then as dcgriz suggested, use pliers or an adjustable wrench to tweak it back. Sometimes you can bring it back to life. I've done it.

    If it pulsates and you can't bend it back into shape then replace the rim.

  4. #4
    Life Coach
    Reputation: Sully00's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    300
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
    If you can not feeling it while riding or braking, don't touch it.

    If you feel pulsating while braking, then as dcgriz suggested, use pliers or an adjustable wrench to tweak it back. Sometimes you can bring it back to life. I've done it.

    If it pulsates and you can't bend it back into shape then replace the rim.
    It pulsates when braking alright...It feels like I'm riding a Sybian.

    Will bike shops even attempt it or is it strictly a DIY?
    2013 Felt Z85 ~ Mavic Kysrium Elite S

  5. #5
    Boyd Cycling owner
    Reputation: coachboyd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    372
    It is going to be extremely hard to get this back to even again. I have tried on very slightly bent rims and sometimes you can do it. . .but even .3mm difference in rim consistency can cause some pretty good pulsating.

    I would plan on not being able to fix that. . .but keep the wheel around. It's still rideable in an emergency, or as a good trainer wheel.
    www.boydcycling.com Handcrafted Revolution

  6. #6
    A wheelist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,321
    Quote Originally Posted by dcgriz View Post
    follow the sequence on Mike T's page about correcting an uneven rim joint.
    I never made that pic tutorial with the thought of it being used to cure a bent rim. I did it for fixing a mismatched joint on a sleeved rim - where it worked perfectly. I don't know whether I'd try it on a bent rim but what's to lose? I'm mostly with Coach Boyd on this.

    BTW - the late Paul Morningstar made and marketed "Rim Rench" for dented rims (that did not have a fold line). He claimed that the tool worked far better than any adapted wrench. Maybe someone still has them in stock.

    Morningstar Tools Rim 'Rench review - BikeRadar

    Then there is this -

    DIY rim rench
    .

  7. #7
    grizzly moderator
    Reputation: dcgriz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,714
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    I never made that pic tutorial with the thought of it being used to cure a bent rim. I did it for fixing a mismatched joint on a sleeved rim - where it worked perfectly. I don't know whether I'd try it on a bent rim but what's to lose? I'm mostly with Coach Boyd on this.]
    I know but I think it would still work to smooth out the peak of a bump if there is one left after the straightening with the pliers is done.

    BTW, the one and only time I had to fix a bent rim it was when I run into a pothole and bent both rims. I was able to bring them back to use just by using welding pliers. They were Velocity DV and still are to use today with a couple thousand miles on them since the incident.

    Anyway, sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. Nothing to loose other than $8 for a pair of welding pliers if you don't already have one. If they hold the tire bead straight and don't pulsate when braking they will be fine, if they don't, make coat hangers out of them and tell the story to your grandchildren.
    With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important.

  8. #8
    A wheelist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,321
    Quote Originally Posted by dcgriz View Post
    I know but I think it would still work to smooth out the peak of a bump if there is one left after the straightening with the pliers is done.

    BTW, the one and only time I had to fix a bent rim it was when I run into a pothole and bent both rims. I was able to bring them back to use just by using welding pliers. They were Velocity DV and still are to use today with a couple thousand miles on them since the incident.

    Anyway, sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. Nothing to loose other than $8 for a pair of welding pliers if you don't already have one. If they hold the tire bead straight and don't pulsate when braking they will be fine, if they don't, make coat hangers out of them and tell the story to your grandchildren.
    Yup, 10-4 on all that Griz. Anything's worth a try - especially by a tinkerer like me.
    .

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: looigi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    7,162
    I've straightened many a bent brake tracks. I lay the track against a flat piece of wood and use a polycarbonate rod and hammer to whack it into shape using a machinists rule as a straightedge to gauge progress and results. As long as the bead hooks isn't seriously deformed and any residual brake pulsing is acceptable it should be good.
    ... 'cuz that's how I roll.

Similar Threads

  1. Made in the USA
    By apaterso in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 08-19-2010, 11:33 AM
  2. Italian made - Oriental made Colnago
    By european.dr in forum Colnago
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-30-2010, 06:14 PM
  3. I like to be made fun of.
    By jparman in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 12-12-2008, 04:44 PM
  4. Made in USA?
    By MSP Greg in forum Cannondale
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 04-03-2008, 06:44 PM
  5. It made it this far :(
    By thespoonman in forum Commuting, Touring and Ride Reports
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-29-2008, 08:37 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.