• 01-15-2015
    NorCal FNG
    New Shimano 105 11 Speed hub same size as old 10 speed hub?
    Would like to upgrade an old wheel set to 11 speed. Does anyone know if the 11 speed 5800 hub has the same flange size and spacing as an old 6500 hub? If so would it be OK to reuse the old spokes assuming everything is in good shape.

    Thanks for any input
  • 01-16-2015
    Mike T.
    Measure it. It's the only way you're going to be 100% sure. Bad advice might cost you a lot of work.
  • 01-16-2015
    ibericb
    Like Mike said, measure it. This may help. If it is a Shimano 10-spd hub, the freehub length will be 1.8 mm shorter than that needed for an 11-speed cassette. If the hub is other than Shimano, the critical length is the freehub. Some of those have upgrade options; Shimano doesn't.

    edit - caught this later, and realized I somewhat misunderstood your question. Answer is still measure. But I'll include this just for grins ... the Prowheelbuilder spoke calculator gives the same flange diameter for both the FH-6500 and FH-5800. There is a 1 mm shift in the locknut to flange dimensions (right longer / left shorter on 11-speed), but that's about it. Using a hypothetical build with a 586mm ERD, it gave the same spoke lengths for the two different hubs. Caveat emptor - their cited measurements may not be right.
  • 01-16-2015
    ergott
    The spoke lengths will be the same. Hubs effect spoke length much less than ERD does. The flange diameter matters if they are significantly different, but center to flange spacing does little to effect the spoke length. I can use the same spoke lengths for both Tune and White Industries hubs for example.
  • 01-16-2015
    NorCal FNG
    Thanks for the input.
  • 01-17-2015
    AndrwSwitch
    You also asked if you can reuse your old spokes.

    I've done a hub swap. It's actually a little more work than just building a new wheel from scratch because I took apart the wheel nicely - that is I detensioned the spokes a little bit at a time before removing them - and I tried to rebuild with everything in its original position. I trashed a couple spoke nipples too.

    I had more time than money and got a hub for $5, so it made sense. But in general, I think it's kind of a questionable approach unless you've got special rims. The hub's the expensive part. For not that much more, you can probably get a complete wheel with a nice, fresh brake track from a reputable builder.

    In the end, the wheel I did the hub swap on had lasted the life of the rim. So it turned out fine. But i don't think I'd do it again now that I'm back to working full-time.