Please, recommend some 36-hole rims for Audax riding - Page 2
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 71
  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    119
    You are so right, sir.I have seen people finish the brevet 2-3 hours before I do, with ridiculous, very old, heavy bikes, sometimes $ 300 MTB ones.I had a sub-9 kg De Rosa with Campagnolo Chorus...and I was able to finish 310 km /1800m denivelee in 18 hours - this is my best achievement so far.I see you are a CX`er.I bought a brand new Guerciotti Cross Force alu frame with CF fork for ridiculous price, something like $ 500 shipped, with 2 cosmetic scratched.I have read that a CX bike offer a more upright riding position, wider tyres like the 400 gram heavy 700 x 35C Vittoria Voyager Hyper, folding version.I bought 3 pairs on sale - I am always after ridiculously good sales.BUT some people say a CX bike would make me hunched over...bend...etc. for Audax brevets.What would you say ?

  2. #27
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    787
    Awe, come on, Fixt001: this considered a smooth road where I live (southern Belgium/Northern France).

    What the heck are you complaining about
    Last edited by BelgianHammer; 01-25-2015 at 04:24 AM.

  3. #28
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    119
    Well, I have visited Paris in Northern France for a few weeks, and Gap in Southern France.I never saw a single hole on the road...I thought more advanced countries in Western Europe like Belgium and France had silky - smooth roads...When riding Audax in Bulgaria, especially hilly ones, you occasionaly get something like XC riding on asphalt, lol...I even bought 700 x 38C folding tyres.Did I go too wide for roads like this ?




  4. #29
    CX'er
    Reputation: bikerector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    863
    Quote Originally Posted by Fixt00l View Post
    You are so right, sir.I have seen people finish the brevet 2-3 hours before I do, with ridiculous, very old, heavy bikes, sometimes $ 300 MTB ones.I had a sub-9 kg De Rosa with Campagnolo Chorus...and I was able to finish 310 km /1800m denivelee in 18 hours - this is my best achievement so far.I see you are a CX`er.I bought a brand new Guerciotti Cross Force alu frame with CF fork for ridiculous price, something like $ 500 shipped, with 2 cosmetic scratched.I have read that a CX bike offer a more upright riding position, wider tyres like the 400 gram heavy 700 x 35C Vittoria Voyager Hyper, folding version.I bought 3 pairs on sale - I am always after ridiculously good sales.BUT some people say a CX bike would make me hunched over...bend...etc. for Audax brevets.What would you say ?
    As far as using a Cx bike, the "type" of CX bike is really important here since there have been a lot of sub-genre splitting recently, just like there are a ton of styles of road bikes or at least the additional naming conventions.

    A race oriented CX bike CAN make you hunched over more but doesn't have to. I've got to think that for brevets, you're looking for a saddle -bar drop of about level so it should be pretty easy to achieve that with any of them. With a race oriented CX bike will generally have a smaller headtube though meaning you would want more headset spacers. They're also going to be a little twitchier in the front end since they're intended to navigate a CX course which has a lot of turns.

    A crossbike intended for utility use, many steel CX bikes fall into this category, will generally have a more plush designed geometry which I think would be perfect for Brevet riding. An example would be a Surly crosscheck which has been used for touring b a good number of people. I personally built up an all-city space horse when I was planning to do more brevet type riding before I caught the racing bug and gave up that idea to focus on training for races.

    Basically, it's all about how you set the bike up and what is comfortable for you. I personally can't stand too upright of a position as it kills my rear end, as I found out with my initial setup on the space horse when I had it. It was just too much pressure on the butt and I was used to it being more split between the upper body, butt/crotch, and core.

    The twitchy handling is what I would worry about the most if the bike is a true cross racer type. After a dozen hours or so it might feel like you're fighting it a lot more, especially if you're dealing with cross winds or bumpier terrain that forces you to correct your steering a lot.

    I have read of plenty of riders completing brevets on regular road bikes without too much issue. Probably not ideal but... ride what you brung, as they say. I have a friend that rides an endurance type road bike without any problems for a 24hr endurance road event. They don't have to carry much on the bike since they just do a lot of laps so they have a pit area but they still ride the bike for a really long time without much stopping.

    With most things, I would recommend riding what you have and seeing what you do and don't like about it so if/when you get a new one you can really dial in the requirements and get a more "perfect" choice for the job.

  5. #30
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    119
    This is a very good answer, sir.It will be very informative to anyone who reads this thread.I am now worried about the handling, as the frameset still awaits funds, since last year.I know it is a standart geometry one, and I did some measurements :

    Chainstays = 42 cm

    Center - to - center top tube and c-t-c seat tube : Both measure 54.5 cm

    Headtube measures 15.5 cm. What do you think ? Will it be twitchy and make me tired when Audax riding ?


  6. #31
    CX'er
    Reputation: bikerector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    863
    Quote Originally Posted by Fixt00l View Post
    This is a very good answer, sir.It will be very informative to anyone who reads this thread.I am now worried about the handling, as the frameset still awaits funds, since last year.I know it is a standart geometry one, and I did some measurements :

    Chainstays = 42 cm

    Center - to - center top tube and c-t-c seat tube : Both measure 54.5 cm

    Headtube measures 15.5 cm. What do you think ? Will it be twitchy and make me tired when Audax riding ?

    Headtube angle and seattube angle? Generally, the larger the headtube angle number the more twitchy it will feel.

    Based on the picture, it looks like it would be fine. It will still be less twitchy on pavement than a road racer. I think CX race bikes are right around endurance road type bikes for the headtube angle meaning they're a little slower steering the a road racer but not much.

    The chainstay length suggests more of a CX race geometry, as would the carbon fork. 425mm is what race CX bikes use, 430-435mm is the more utilitarian type (though the surly crosscheck is 425mm). Still, I would think it will be fine to ride as CX bikes are incredible versatile, though maybe not ideal for the really long brevets you plan to do down the road.

    The "square" seat tube and top tube measurement (same lengths) should be a good sign though, I always like seeing that for a neutral handling bike. I see that on many steel bikes.

    The headtube is a decent length, not as short as a racer type and not as long as a "gravel road" bike.

    I think the bike is an in-between of a race type and utilitarian type, so kind of an all-purpose design. It should be a good compromise of things to be relaxed but efficient/aero/aggressive for brevet depending on how you fit it. Maybe an extra couple headset spacers and it should be good.

    The short chainstay most likely means it won't handle heavier loaded panniers well, at least that's been my experience using cross bikes for commuting or transporting things around with my old bike. Without rack mounts, probably not a great idea anyway to put much weight on the rear triangle if you rig up clamps to do a rear rack.

  7. #32
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    119
    With each answer, you keep helping me discover new things about my bike.I found a document about the geometry in German language.I am not sure if my frame is 54 or 55, If it is correct, for Guerciotti Cross Force and Kangaroo - the document says the following about size 55:

    Sitzrohr M-O : 59

    Sitzrohr : 73,45

    Steuerrohr : 73,3 ( and 73 for size 54, should I be worried ? )

    By the way, I am not a navite English speaker, so I have no idea what does " twitchy " handling mean...

    And, since you say so, no rear rack for me.The frame has no mounts, but I would not bother clamping one, since their prices are always skyrocketing.How about something like this ? A guy in town sells his bag and seatpost rack for $ 50.

    Topeak® Cycling Accessories ? Products - MTX TrunkBag DX

    Topeak® Cycling Accessories ? Products - MTX BeamRack EX

  8. #33
    CX'er
    Reputation: bikerector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    863
    Quote Originally Posted by Fixt00l View Post
    With each answer, you keep helping me discover new things about my bike.I found a document about the geometry in German language.I am not sure if my frame is 54 or 55, If it is correct, for Guerciotti Cross Force and Kangaroo - the document says the following about size 55:

    Sitzrohr M-O : 59

    Sitzrohr : 73,45

    Steuerrohr : 73,3 ( and 73 for size 54, should I be worried ? )

    By the way, I am not a navite English speaker, so I have no idea what does " twitchy " handling mean...

    And, since you say so, no rear rack for me.The frame has no mounts, but I would not bother clamping one, since their prices are always skyrocketing.How about something like this ? A guy in town sells his bag and seatpost rack for $ 50.

    Topeak® Cycling Accessories ? Products - MTX TrunkBag DX

    Topeak® Cycling Accessories ? Products - MTX BeamRack EX
    The topeak setup is pretty solid as long as you don't use a weight weenie seatpost. My local shop sells a fair amount of those setups to commuters because it's really easy for the end user to put on and take off. You can't load them with a lot of weight but they're great for small things or carrying lunch for work or a picnic or whatever.

    "twitchy" would mean with little input to the handle bars, the bike wants to steer quickly; basically the opposite of stable. "Fast steering" is another term I've heard used. If you think of it like running over a stone or into a pot hole, a "twitchy" handling bike will be re-driected quite easily by the hole or rock. A "stable" bike will either go over it with little input to the handlebars or it will react slower so that you are less likely to be caught off guard. Mountain bikes are considerably more stable than road bikes, as an example. The front wheel of the mountain bike points forward much easier than than the road bike when you start getting into things that want to adjust your line. Gravel roads are a place where this becomes very obvious because you can ride it with either and there's always small amounts of input that wants to redirect your front wheel.

    I hope that helps explain it.

    About the numbers, I had some help from google translate and I'm not sure what the top one actually represents as a 59cm seat tube on a bike at that size would not make sense to me. The 2nd and 3rd numbers appear to be the angles of the seat tube and head tube. Based on that information, I would say you have a road bike with a longer chainstay. So it will be on the faster end for front end steering. My road race bike has a 73.2 degree front, CX race bike has 72.5, and my all-city space horse that I would have used for brevets had a 72.2 degree. I ride a different size bike than you which will account for some variation but it would seem with the numbers that the bike is kind of a race geometry with a taller headtube.

    Big tires should negate a lot of the loss of stability, something that should be taken into account as well. It does seem like you'll have a nimble bike overall though, as opposed to the more stable ride some prefer for longer ride distances.

  9. #34
    CX'er
    Reputation: bikerector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    863
    For comparison, here's the bike I thought would be about perfect for what you're looking to use the bike for after a lot of research on bike frames available in the US, without going custom.

    Space Horse | All-City Cycles

  10. #35
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    119
    Well, I guess I now have an idea of what I got.I am not a serious tourer, so loaded bike, panniers, etc is out of the question.I occasionaly ride Audax, a couple of times per year, and that is all.So, I will get the Topeak and keep hoping that I would not hit it when pedalling.
    I still have no idea what those angles mean.You mention big tyres.I scored an incredible deal at PlanetX, and the Vittoria Voyager Hyper 700x35C comes at 410 grams.The 38C comes at 460 grams.Will that negate a loss of stability ? You say this should be taken into account.What steering should I expect from this setup ? Unstable, easy to fall from the bike, difficult cornering ? I am quite confused.

  11. #36
    CX'er
    Reputation: bikerector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    863
    I should corner very well.

    Wider tires, to me, are anything over 25mm. The wider contact patch of the wider tires gives you more side to side stability.

    I think you'll have a nice setup for training an things. It wouldn't be my first choice for an all-day type bike but you can do it fine. I've ridden plenty of 100 mile days on my road race bike, though you can feel a little sore by the end from the more aggressive fit and not being used to being in it for so long.

    The bike won't be easy to fall from, just less stable than a more relaxed front end. It won't be unstable.

    I like vittoria's tire. I don't have experience with the voyager but I really liked the randonneur tire in 32mm, I think the voyager is a similar thing as the randonneur was a tire I rode a few years ago before I started riding exclusively maxxis tires. I think the 35mm tire would be plenty for your uses and still allow room for fenders and such. Most cross frames allow up to 35mm tires but can start getting close on tire clearance if you go too much over that.

    C = mm in tire speak so a 35c tire is a 35mm wide tire if sized accurately.

  12. #37
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    787
    bikerector,

    Speaking of cross frames, boy it sure does get deflating in your older age when you see some of the youngin's (on the road, group rides) come flying by you on their cross machines, keeping up and sometime ssurpassing the high avg pace of the group. But then I remember, hey, those cross bikes are getting to the point that they are just as road worthy (in terms of performance) as road bikes. At least, that's what I tell my older self. Gawd darn stinking kids: youth is so wasted on the young, lol, I wanna go back....... ;-)

  13. #38
    CX'er
    Reputation: bikerector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    863
    A bit light on details but I thought it would be a relevant article for the conversation. The website might have something with better details if you have time to search it.

    Touring Aboard a Cyclocross Bike | Adventure Cycling Association

  14. #39
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    119
    I am happy to revive this wonderful thread, but...I have hit a major problem.No LBS would bother assembling my bike ! Someone at PlanetX told me they used to sell Guerciotti frames at low prices, as they have no idea whatsoever - the frames come with no under BB cable guide and no bolts...They sold me a wide one, but it does not fit, as seen in the photos.I have asked at least a dozens shops, and nobody can help me.Now I have expensive parts that took my savings for two years...Does anybody have any idea ?IMGP2095.jpgIMGP2090.jpg

  15. #40
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: froze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    7,219
    I can't believe that no LBS can help you with a simple cable guide. Measure the distance between the two holes (center of hole to center) and get a cable guide with those measurements.

    If that fails it's not a big deal to drill a hole or two if necessary into the BB shell to match the cable guide holes. After drilling the holes cover the exposed metal with white paint.

  16. #41
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    119
    Thank you - after a serious illness, I am back.I am pleased to announce that my Cross Force was finally built today.It rides like a dream, I quite like the handling - I have to use little to no force to make turns, even sharp cornering.Vittoria Voyager Hyper 700 x 38C tyres are a dream on bad roads.An ex-racer has built and fine-tuned my old Campagnolo Chorus 9 speed groupset from 1999, trusty and true, it works...sort of.LBS ruined the fine tuning and...guess what ? Although I warned them a few times to quit trying to sell me shimaNO, they tried again today.
    The problem ? My trusty Chorus shifters with pointy hoods lost some springs and broke.I sent them to the UK Campagnolo service center, they were repaired and rebuild - the mechanic told me they are now upgradeable to 10 speed, and also, they have put the new indexing, so I can use post-2000 nine speed rear derailleur.Unfortunately, now my 9 speed year 1998 Chorus rear derailleur does not work well.I found a 2003 Campagnolo Veloce one, it should be Ultra-shift compatible, right ? Should I buy one and try ? This way I can fit a 14-28 cassette.

    Campagnolo 2003 Veloce 9 Speed Rear Derailleur for Road Cycling | eBay


  17. #42
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    119
    Well, since I am successfully recovering after some quite serious orthopedic problems that lastet for years, I am happy to say that I won`t get surgery. I started visiting a renowned fitness coach, changed my life completely - I cook my own, healthy food, I bought dozens of kilograms of protein / amino-acids, and for the first time in my life, I moved out to a very nice place, that was built just 3 years ago. Best of all - it has an awesome, roomy basements. My first thought was - I am buying two more bikes, so a total of 4!!!
    Back to this thread, I found some British wheels that come with spare spokes, free shipping to Europe. Since I stocked on 700x38 Vittoria Voyager Hyper tyres, I guess these are the wheels that will help me finish all brevets required for qualification to ride the world`s most famous brever, Paris-Brest-Paris. I am tempted to go for the 28/32 spokes wheelset for increased comfort, and maybe be safety, as roads are unbelievably bad here, they were build in the last century... What are your thoughts on these wheelsets, please?
    https://www.huntbikewheels.com/colle...-28deep-22wide
    https://www.huntbikewheels.com/colle...-31deep-24wide
    Quote Originally Posted by Bee-an-key View Post
    Using a Shimano grease on a Campy part will result in a new world order, your wheels will only spin one way, your bottom bracket will only turn from 12 oclock to 6 oclock, your headset will only turn left. Big problems. Use Sram and your bike will only roll backwards.

  18. #43
    Russian Troll Farmer
    Reputation: No Time Toulouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    2,273
    So.......you expect to compete in the Paris-Brest-Paris with a cheap $400 wheelset???? Is this a troll post?

    Edit: OK, now that I've looked trough previous posts, I now realize that this is an 'ongoing troll post'. My bad. Sorry for breaking into your comedy routine....
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  19. #44
    [REDACTED]
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    9,615
    Quote Originally Posted by Fixt00l View Post
    Well, since I am successfully recovering after some quite serious orthopedic problems that lastet for years, I am happy to say that I won`t get surgery. I started visiting a renowned fitness coach, changed my life completely - I cook my own, healthy food, I bought dozens of kilograms of protein / amino-acids, and for the first time in my life, I moved out to a very nice place, that was built just 3 years ago. Best of all - it has an awesome, roomy basements. My first thought was - I am buying two more bikes, so a total of 4!!!
    Back to this thread, I found some British wheels that come with spare spokes, free shipping to Europe. Since I stocked on 700x38 Vittoria Voyager Hyper tyres, I guess these are the wheels that will help me finish all brevets required for qualification to ride the world`s most famous brever, Paris-Brest-Paris. I am tempted to go for the 28/32 spokes wheelset for increased comfort, and maybe be safety, as roads are unbelievably bad here, they were build in the last century... What are your thoughts on these wheelsets, please?
    https://www.huntbikewheels.com/colle...-28deep-22wide
    https://www.huntbikewheels.com/colle...-31deep-24wide
    My first question is how much do you weigh now? Unless you are feather light, my gut feeling is to steer away from an aero wheel that weighs under 1600g. Something has to be compromised somewhere. Whether it's the rims or hubs, I can't imagine you will get longevity out of this wheelset. It's up to you whether you think it's worth taking a $422 chance. If you're going for one of these, I would choose the less aero version.

    I still think a build with the DT R460's are probably your best bang for the buck. They have an internal width of 18mm which will work fine for your tires of choice.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  20. #45
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    My first question is how much do you weigh now? Unless you are feather light, my gut feeling is to steer away from an aero wheel that weighs under 1600g. Something has to be compromised somewhere. Whether it's the rims or hubs, I can't imagine you will get longevity out of this wheelset. It's up to you whether you think it's worth taking a $422 chance. If you're going for one of these, I would choose the less aero version.

    I still think a build with the DT R460's are probably your best bang for the buck. They have an internal width of 18mm which will work fine for your tires of choice.
    Thanks, Mr. Lombard. I currently weight 86 kg, I visit the gym 2-3 times a week and try my best to get a healthy diet, I spent over $ 1 000 on proteins and amino-acids, so I guess I can get to 80 kg in a few months. I am 179 cm tall, and my current wheelset is built on Campagnolo Record - silver hubs, the ones with a hole for oiling. Using the cheapest Mach 1 210 19mm rims, it weights 2160gr, with 36 spokes. Each rim is 530gr. Some people told me this is enough for Audax and touring, as it is reliable and tough (I rode it for at least 1 000 km total for 2 years, when I was 98 kg, with a 15 kg load). Running a Chorus 2x9 setup, that will soon be upgraded to 2x10 by Graeme, so I could run the 13-29. Now I am running a 13-26, with a 34-46 compact carbon crankset (596 gr). Total bike weight, including pedals and a bracketed handlebar bag, is a little less than 11kg. Since I am not a light rider, I was thinking of buying the 32 spokes one, as the seller claims a 130kg rider has tested it...But, nevertheless, it is not a cheap wheelset and I will have to save money for a few months. On the other hand, why not, one has to spend his money somewhere.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bee-an-key View Post
    Using a Shimano grease on a Campy part will result in a new world order, your wheels will only spin one way, your bottom bracket will only turn from 12 oclock to 6 oclock, your headset will only turn left. Big problems. Use Sram and your bike will only roll backwards.

  21. #46
    [REDACTED]
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    9,615
    Quote Originally Posted by Fixt00l View Post
    Thanks, Mr. Lombard. I currently weight 86 kg, I visit the gym 2-3 times a week and try my best to get a healthy diet, I spent over $ 1 000 on proteins and amino-acids, so I guess I can get to 80 kg in a few months. I am 179 cm tall, and my current wheelset is built on Campagnolo Record - silver hubs, the ones with a hole for oiling. Using the cheapest Mach 1 210 19mm rims, it weights 2160gr, with 36 spokes. Each rim is 530gr. Some people told me this is enough for Audax and touring, as it is reliable and tough (I rode it for at least 1 000 km total for 2 years, when I was 98 kg, with a 15 kg load). Running a Chorus 2x9 setup, that will soon be upgraded to 2x10 by Graeme, so I could run the 13-29. Now I am running a 13-26, with a 34-46 compact carbon crankset (596 gr). Total bike weight, including pedals and a bracketed handlebar bag, is a little less than 11kg. Since I am not a light rider, I was thinking of buying the 32 spokes one, as the seller claims a 130kg rider has tested it...But, nevertheless, it is not a cheap wheelset and I will have to save money for a few months. On the other hand, why not, one has to spend his money somewhere.
    Depending on how much torque you put to the pedals, the aluminum freehub body could be a problem. In time, your cassette will gouge the soft aluminum freehub. If you need a bike mechanic to separate your cassette from your freehub, be sure to tip him well as there will be lots of cursing while he's trying to separate them.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  22. #47
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    119
    So, what is your advice, what would I do? Having ridden more than 10 000 miles with these hubs and the same cassette, no problems at all...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bee-an-key View Post
    Using a Shimano grease on a Campy part will result in a new world order, your wheels will only spin one way, your bottom bracket will only turn from 12 oclock to 6 oclock, your headset will only turn left. Big problems. Use Sram and your bike will only roll backwards.

  23. #48
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Mackers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    282
    Just disregard Lombard.

    There is no problem with gouging on Campy freehubs.

  24. #49
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,856
    Quote Originally Posted by Mackers View Post
    Just disregard Lombard.

    There is no problem with gouging on Campy freehubs.
    This.
    Too old to ride plastic

  25. #50
    [REDACTED]
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    9,615
    Quote Originally Posted by Mackers View Post
    Just disregard Lombard.

    There is no problem with gouging on Campy freehubs.
    None ever? Do they have anti-bite splines? If so, I stand corrected. If not, then this could easily happen with a stronger or heavier rider.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. recommend a rim for 36-hole 126mm bombproof build
    By Bob Ross in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-06-2012, 01:47 PM
  2. Looking for 20 hole tubular rims.
    By medic352 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-15-2012, 06:30 PM
  3. 24 hole rims
    By zoikz in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-28-2012, 04:08 AM
  4. 20 hole rims?
    By Ramjm_2000 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-01-2006, 07:42 AM
  5. 32 hole sew-up rims
    By toomanybikes in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-11-2005, 04:32 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.