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  1. #51
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    You really don't know what you're talking about.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mackers View Post
    You really don't know what you're talking about.
    Not to put too fine of a point on it.
    Too old to ride plastic

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mackers View Post
    You really don't know what you're talking about.
    Seriously now, if you have a valid point to back up your argument, I may defer to your judgment. However, if all you have to say is "you don't know what you are talking about", then you're just an empty windbag not worth listening to.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Seriously now, if you have a valid point to back up your argument, I may defer to your judgment. However, if all you have to say is "you don't know what you are talking about", then you're just an empty windbag not worth listening to.
    Besides your say so, do you have any statistics to back up your assumption about gouging Campagnolo free hubs?
    Too old to ride plastic

  5. #55
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    Most his remarks are based on second hand info. Mike T said this, My LBS recommends that, etc. Very little real life personal experience. But he does post a lot.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Besides your say so, do you have any statistics to back up your assumption about gouging Campagnolo free hubs?
    Campagnolo free hubs specifically, no. Aluminum freehubs in general, yes. I am not bashing Campagnolo. I mearly mentioned that Campagnolo freehubs are aluminum and therefore prone to cassette gouging. I then acknowleged that I could be wrong and asked if they have steel splines which is a solution to alloy freehub gouging. Is this the case or did I simply commit sacrilege against the almighty Campagnolo god.

    In the immortal words of Ross Perot, I'm all ears.
    Last edited by Lombard; 01-14-2019 at 06:13 PM.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  7. #57
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    I do appreciate the comments - since I have not had any problems in 10 000 miles, I`d say the older Record hubs are reliable. The purpose of this thread is to discuss the pros and cons of a Hunt wheelsets for my needs, as the Hunt wheels are the best bang for the buck I found in Europe, and I compared a lot of sellers. Since I am a comfort freak, I fear that anything less than 32H will be a torture... But hey, 500g weight savings in the wheels is about 2kg total loss of weight in the bike, that is tempting.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bee-an-key View Post
    Using a Shimano grease on a Campy part will result in a new world order, your wheels will only spin one way, your bottom bracket will only turn from 12 oclock to 6 oclock, your headset will only turn left. Big problems. Use Sram and your bike will only roll backwards.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fixt00l View Post
    I do appreciate the comments - since I have not had any problems in 10 000 miles, I`d say the older Record hubs are reliable. The purpose of this thread is to discuss the pros and cons of a Hunt wheelsets for my needs, as the Hunt wheels are the best bang for the buck I found in Europe, and I compared a lot of sellers. Since I am a comfort freak, I fear that anything less than 32H will be a torture... But hey, 500g weight savings in the wheels is about 2kg total loss of weight in the bike, that is tempting.
    What does spoke count have to do with comfort. Or are you talking figuratively?
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Campagnolo free hubs specifically, no. Aluminum freehubs in general, yes. I am not bashing Campagnolo. I mearly mentioned that Record freehubs are aluminum and therefore prone to cassette gouging. I than acknowleged that I could be wrong and asked if they have steel splines which is a solution to alloy freehub gouging. Is this the case or did I simply commit sacrilege against the almighty Campagnolo god.

    In the immortal words of Ross Perot, I'm all ears.
    I wouldn't call your statements sacrilege, I would call them assumptions based on other makers products. Or should I say "baseless assumptions"?
    Too old to ride plastic

  10. #60
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    Well, I believe more spokes means more comfort, and increased realiability. Some of the most experienced Audax riders claim that with 32-36 spokes, one can finish the Audax with 1-2 broken spokes, not so with the 24 spoke wheels. Since I have had broken both wrists and the right leg too, I am quite sensitive comfort-wise, unfortunately. One hybrid bike came with 28H wheels, and 35mm tyres. It was quick and lively, but the comfort was bad. I replaced the wheels with 36H, wider rims and 38C tyres...and the difference was quite noticeable. I am sorry that I am an isolated case and I want to make the best out of my bikes in terms of comfort and value - I know many riders can ride faster than me on any bike and any wheelset, without caring for the comfort, but I am not one of them.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bee-an-key View Post
    Using a Shimano grease on a Campy part will result in a new world order, your wheels will only spin one way, your bottom bracket will only turn from 12 oclock to 6 oclock, your headset will only turn left. Big problems. Use Sram and your bike will only roll backwards.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I wouldn't call your statements sacrilege, I would call them assumptions based on other makers products. Or should I say "baseless assumptions"?
    So tell me, what does Campagnolo do to prevent cassette gouging that other aluminum freehubs don't have. Enlighten me.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fixt00l View Post
    Well, I believe more spokes means more comfort, and increased realiability. Some of the most experienced Audax riders claim that with 32-36 spokes, one can finish the Audax with 1-2 broken spokes, not so with the 24 spoke wheels. Since I have had broken both wrists and the right leg too, I am quite sensitive comfort-wise, unfortunately. One hybrid bike came with 28H wheels, and 35mm tyres. It was quick and lively, but the comfort was bad. I replaced the wheels with 36H, wider rims and 38C tyres...and the difference was quite noticeable. I am sorry that I am an isolated case and I want to make the best out of my bikes in terms of comfort and value - I know many riders can ride faster than me on any bike and any wheelset, without caring for the comfort, but I am not one of them.
    The improvement in comfort had more to do with the tires than wheels.
    Too old to ride plastic

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fixt00l View Post
    Well, I believe more spokes means more comfort, and increased realiability. Some of the most experienced Audax riders claim that with 32-36 spokes, one can finish the Audax with 1-2 broken spokes, not so with the 24 spoke wheels. Since I have had broken both wrists and the right leg too, I am quite sensitive comfort-wise, unfortunately. One hybrid bike came with 28H wheels, and 35mm tyres. It was quick and lively, but the comfort was bad. I replaced the wheels with 36H, wider rims and 38C tyres...and the difference was quite noticeable. I am sorry that I am an isolated case and I want to make the best out of my bikes in terms of comfort and value - I know many riders can ride faster than me on any bike and any wheelset, without caring for the comfort, but I am not one of them.
    Comfort wise, your tires are the biggest players. All else makes a negligible difference. It was the wider tires you found more comfortable. And the wider the tires are, the less pressure you will need, so more comfort.

    More spokes do generally make a more reliable wheel, but on a rim brake bike, the front needs fewer spokes than the rear in order to be reliable. Spokes seldom, if ever, break on a front wheel as there are no twisting forces there.

    I build my rim brake wheelsets 24H front and 32H rear. Could I get away with less? My take is why chance it for negligible weight savings. Some commercial road wheels are actually built 16/20 which doesn't make a lot of sense since for a 16 or 20 spoke wheel to be reliable, the rim must be heavier. But hey, people think 16 spoke radial wheels are sexy. And remember, sex sells!

    I should mention that I did break a spoke on a 24 spoke rear wheel during a ride. I was able to adjust other spokes to finish the ride which was 30 more miles, though I was very careful.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  14. #64
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    I respectfully disagree it was the tyres. On the same bike, after I put the newer wheelset, I tried riding with the same Voyager Hyper tyres - first in 700x35, and then, in 700x38c. The difference in comfort was significantly smaller, than the one with the 28H wheelset. But anyway...how about that Hunt wheelset? So you all think that it won`t be less comfortable than my current 36H wheelset, that has basic Mach 1 210 (622x19) rims? The Hunt wheelset is deeper, which suggests a harsher ride.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bee-an-key View Post
    Using a Shimano grease on a Campy part will result in a new world order, your wheels will only spin one way, your bottom bracket will only turn from 12 oclock to 6 oclock, your headset will only turn left. Big problems. Use Sram and your bike will only roll backwards.

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fixt00l View Post
    I respectfully disagree it was the tyres. On the same bike, after I put the newer wheelset, I tried riding with the same Voyager Hyper tyres - first in 700x35, and then, in 700x38c. The difference in comfort was significantly smaller, than the one with the 28H wheelset. But anyway...how about that Hunt wheelset? So you all think that it won`t be less comfortable than my current 36H wheelset, that has basic Mach 1 210 (622x19) rims? The Hunt wheelset is deeper, which suggests a harsher ride.
    Hard to believe you can feel the difference. If anything, more spokes will feel stiffer, but to a very small degree. What were the internal dimensions of each of these wheelsets? Wider rims will make the tires effectively wider.

    Aero wheels won't make any difference in comfort, but they could be a disadvantage in crosswinds. And if you regularly ride along roads with fast moving trucks, think twice.

    I think you already know how I feel about the Hunt wheels. I will let the other Einsteins here chime in since they have already told me I don't know what I am talking about. So they must surely have some good advice for you.
    Last edited by Lombard; 01-14-2019 at 05:20 PM.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    So.......you expect to compete in the Paris-Brest-Paris with a cheap $400 wheelset???? Is this a troll post?
    Why would it be a troll post?
    I'd ride Paris-Brest-Paris on my Campagnolo Zondas without hesitations. And they were only a bit over EUR 400,-

  17. #67
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    To be fair, I had a set of 36h H PLUS SON Archetypes built with 105 hubs by prowheelbuilder.com and they ran just a little over $400. I’d recommend them.




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    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy... wait.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569 View Post
    To be fair, I had a set of 36h H PLUS SON Archetypes built with 105 hubs by prowheelbuilder.com and they ran just a little over $400. I’d recommend them.
    I would agree with the H PLUS SON Archetypes paired with 105 hubs. DT R460 rims paired with 105 hubs would also make a great wheelset. Though at 190lbs., unless you are carrying 40+ extra pounds, I think 36H would be overkill. 32H would be fine.


    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    So tell me, what does Campagnolo do to prevent cassette gouging that other aluminum freehubs don't have. Enlighten me.
    Surface area

    Lennard Zinn

    "2. Use a Campagnolo freehub body and cassette. The splines are much deeper on Campy freehub bodies, so the pressure is distributed more, and the cogs don’t tend dig into them. If you’re using an 11-speed drivetrain, a Campy wheel is interchangeable with a SRAM or Shimano wheel, generally without derailleur readjustment, because the spacing between cogs is the same with 11-speed cassettes from any of the three brands."

    https://www.velonews.com/2016/08/bik...rywhere_418864

    Too old to ride plastic

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Surface area

    Lennard Zinn

    "2. Use a Campagnolo freehub body and cassette. The splines are much deeper on Campy freehub bodies, so the pressure is distributed more, and the cogs don’t tend dig into them. If you’re using an 11-speed drivetrain, a Campy wheel is interchangeable with a SRAM or Shimano wheel, generally without derailleur readjustment, because the spacing between cogs is the same with 11-speed cassettes from any of the three brands."

    https://www.velonews.com/2016/08/bik...rywhere_418864

    Got it! I learn something new every day.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  21. #71
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    If at all possible reuse the hubs you have. From your description I'm guessing you own the steel axle version from the 9 speed era. These are extremely reliable. Have someone clean them, replace the bearing balls and regrease. Then rebuild to rims of your choice.

    Shimano 105 hubs, though an incredibly good deal and equally reliable, will not accommodate Campy cassettes, and 10 speed spacing between the two is off enough that I wouldn't want to ride a brevet with compromised shifting.

    Depending on your current setup I'd consider trying to find a triple crankset and front derailleur and keep the old wheelset intact. Campy has 50-40-30 triple cranksets.

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