• 11-29-2009
    Gregpape23
    Racing tires/wheels and training tires/wheels
    Ok, so i understand the need for a different set of racing tires and wheels because I wouldnt want to train on my race wheels and everything...
    BUT......do you (poeple who have a race-specific wheelset) train on your racing stuff a little? It seems like you would at least like to break them in and get a good feel for a racing set of wheels. Is that right??

    Thanks!!
  • 11-29-2009
    MarshallH1987
    if it's a new piece i'll do some training on it. New wheels and tires are always good to take out and cruise around on bombing through corners and riding through wind so you get the feel for them. I don't train on my race wheels anymore since i've gotten a couple seasons in on them.
  • 11-29-2009
    rruff
    Sure, you can ride them a little. Tires are better (lower Crr) if they have a couple hundred miles on them, plus you want to make sure everything works right.

    The best reason to have two sets is so that you can have one that is "fresh" and hopefully a little nicer. You can push the envelope with weight, use latex tubes, more fragile tires, etc. Spares are always good too.
  • 11-30-2009
    nick kitchen
    Race wheels are EC90 Aero CT for circuit races, and road races. Ritchey aero clinchers for crits and mavic equipes for training. I rode the ec90s for a while because I just could stay off of them. They are so fast and light. I now only use them for races or important training rides. Like vo2 max or tt training rides. I also use them to motor pacing. Its good to ride them every once in a while so you stay comfortable with them.
  • 12-01-2009
    WeakSister
    ditto what Nick said....also, your carbon tubies will have a different feel when braking, particularly on gnarly descents, so it's important that you get used to them.
  • 12-01-2009
    spade2you
    Definitely take them out to see how they handle, perhaps to also make sure that everything is working 100% before the race. Sometimes they'll feel significantly faster than your every day wheels and it's best to know what to expect.
  • 12-01-2009
    Gregpape23
    ok, so another question....and thank for all the help btw.
    Right now i have pretty crappy wheels. (shimano rs10) I was going to be upgrading to a ksyrium SL for both training and racing. (i figure it can't hurt to train on them since they're not carbon) Would it be a better idea to do a big upgrade now, or buy the ksyriums now and then later get a better wheel. (and when i say 'big upgrade' or better wheel...i was thinking like somehting along the lines of a williams 58 or so.)

    What are your thoughts??
    Oh, and i can get the ksyriums for like 350
  • 12-04-2009
    otoman
    Ksyriums suck. Horrible aerodynamics, difficult to get replacement spokes, heavy, etc., etc. Yes, even the "SL". If you even think you might have the $$ to swing some 58mm carbon tubies, DO IT. Save your Benjamins, don't by the Mavics, ride your Shimano wheels for now and get the sweet race wheels later. It will be worth it and you'll thank me, I promise.
  • 12-05-2009
    nick kitchen
    If you can get the mavics for $350 Id do it. They are a pretty stiff somewhat light wheel. Most of the guys on my team ride them for crits. Id get them and then start saving for a set of carbon tubulars. If you can only get one set then keep saving. Look at the Easton slx.
  • 12-05-2009
    coupon
    I have switched from RS10 to Easton EC90 SLX as well. Not only you get a lighter wheels for hill climb, you will have higher top speed during descent. Keep the RS10 for training and you will appreciate the improvement you get with any other wheels you switching too.
  • 12-05-2009
    Kerry Irons
    Two strikes
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nick kitchen
    If you can get the mavics for $350 Id do it. They are a pretty stiff somewhat light wheel.

    Yes, except they are not that light (for the $$) and objective tests show that they are not stiff either. Oh, and not aero. Other than that, it's all good.
  • 12-05-2009
    Hank Stamper
    I put my rs10's on craigslist for $100 and had tons of people wanting to buy them.
    So you should get at least $100 for them.
    So looking at it that way it makes the ksyriums a $250 investment which is probably well worth while regardless of what you end up using them for. You can always turn around and sell them for nore than you have into them so why not.
    They may not be all they are cracked up to be but they are SO MUCH better than rs10s.
  • 12-06-2009
    alexb618
    most people wouldnt p*ss on rs10 wheels if they were on fire. that said, if they are working ok for you for training, ie not huge flex etc, why change?
  • 12-06-2009
    Gregpape23
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by otoman
    Ksyriums suck. Horrible aerodynamics, difficult to get replacement spokes, heavy, etc., etc. Yes, even the "SL". If you even think you might have the $$ to swing some 58mm carbon tubies, DO IT. Save your Benjamins, don't by the Mavics, ride your Shimano wheels for now and get the sweet race wheels later. It will be worth it and you'll thank me, I promise.

    ok, but would some carbon clinchers be ok? Not tubular? I know tubular is great and all but just for simplicity and saving some $$. I should go clincher... Kinda like the williams 58 carbon clincher...
  • 12-06-2009
    tinman143
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gregpape23
    ok, but would some carbon clinchers be ok? Not tubular? I know tubular is great and all but just for simplicity and saving some $$. I should go clincher... Kinda like the williams 58 carbon clincher...

    do you know what those carbon clincher 58's weigh?? anchors
  • 12-06-2009
    Gregpape23
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tinman143
    do you know what those carbon clincher 58's weigh?? anchors

    Are you talking about the william's specifically, or does the clincher version of anything really weigh it down.
  • 12-06-2009
    alexb618
    there is no reason known to mankind for anyone to buy carbon clinchers for racing
  • 12-06-2009
    tinman143
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gregpape23
    Are you talking about the william's specifically, or does the clincher version of anything really weigh it down.

    william's, adam's, stephen's, chang's, whomever's...carbon clinchers in general will be heavier than their tubular version.