Reason for tubeless.
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  1. #1
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    Reason for tubeless.

    Wondering if others went tubeless for the same reasons as I. I don't ride tubeless because of weight, duh. Nor aerodynamics. The lower tire pressure they allow is offset by generally harsher ride quality compared to the best non-tubeless. The big reason I (and others?) is safety. Two weeks after going tubeless I was doing 45mph down a short but steep hill. When I got to the bottom I stopped 'cause something was "off" and it turned out to be a nasty puncture. My Stans had a hard time sealing it but it did so reasonably well. Front tire puncture that I imagine would have dumped me all over that road had it not been tubeless. Convenience is nice...I've come back from a ride with 4 thorns puncturing my tire while being completely oblivious to it. That is NICE. But saving layers of skin and keeping bones intact is really the sweet part. I've struggled with setting them up but now pretty much have it and for me the time was worth the investment. You?

  2. #2
    changingleaf
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    Yes, safety, they leak air slowly,wheres a tube will leak instantly. Also, no pinch flats. I had too many pinch flat hitting unseen potholes while riding in groups. Tubeless has solved that problem.

  3. #3
    tlg
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    I went tubeless for winter riding so I wouldn't have to change flats with numb fingers when it's 30 outside. Four winters now and not a single flat.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  4. #4
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    I think you're overselling the "safety" aspect. No doubt the tubeless rim and tires make the tire-rim interaction more secured. But tubeless rim also make regular clincher tires more secured too. However, not all tubeless rim and tire interaction have the same secured hold, so it would be a false sense of security to just assume that your tubeless rim setup has the same secured hold as another guy's different setup.

    I have seen a lot of people getting flats (myself included) while descending, and I have not seen or heard of a single incident/story where a tire simply peeled off the rim causing the rider to eat pavement hard. I'm sure it has happened to someone, but I just have not seen or heard of it from anyone.

    If you want to raise up safety, there are many things higher on the list:
    - group ride crashing. I've seen a lot
    - being hit by cars. Know quite a few guys around here who got tagged already, in addition to reading about cyclist being killed in an accident with a car a few times/year around here in Socal.

    When it comes to determining whether to go tubeless or not, I use this main reasoning:
    If you ride in an area where you get flats a lot, then tubeless makes a lot of sense. But if you ride in an area where you only get 2-4 flats/year, then going tubeless makes very little sense. The cost of running tubeless is also generally higher.

    Come to think about it, while riding mountain roads, I get more flats while climbing them then while descending them. I'm guessing the reason is while climbing, I'm riding in the shoulder where there are lots of sharp rocks and since I'm climbing the rear tire also dig into the rocks harder. On the descent, I always take the whole lane and ride in the middle of the lane where there is less debris.

  5. #5
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    More safety with tubeless? No, I'm not buying that. Tubeless has been known to blow off or burp air.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post
    More safety with tubeless? No, I'm not buying that. Tubeless has been known to blow off or burp air.
    I've seen this happens quite a number of times in the mtb world. Guys running too low of a psi can cause the tire to completely blow off if they hit something hard. Another time a buddy of mine left his mtb in his truck with the windows rolled up in the middle of the day, temps got hot inside the truck. We came back to find his tubeless tire completely blown off the rim at one spot and sealant leaking out onto the truck. That was a weird one, but we think it was a defective tire (defective bead?). Also, I've seen a few mtb tubeless tires with their rubber layer delaminating from their carcass layer, probably due to poor manufacturing or QA

    but yeah people have been using regular clinchers (and aluminum wheels) going down mountains for decades now, so it's not really a safety issue

  7. #7
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    ya butt...

    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post
    More safety with tubeless? No, I'm not buying that. Tubeless has been known to blow off or burp air.
    We're talking road tires here. No burping on road tires...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    have not seen or heard of a single incident/story where a tire simply peeled off the rim causing the rider to eat pavement hard.
    Point taken and you may well be correct that my concern is overblown. In that case I'll fall back on protection from...mosquitoes. Up here (Alaska), the worst part of getting a flat can be having to sit around changing a tire while being swarmed by hordes of mosquitoes. In any case...I'm set up tubeless now so I guess I'll stick with it .

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by digibud View Post
    We're talking road tires here. No burping on road tires...
    What pressure are we talking about? My gravel tires are run pretty low.


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    I went tubeless for winter riding so I wouldn't have to change flats with numb fingers when it's 30 outside. Four winters now and not a single flat.
    I didn't get any flats either this Winter, 60 degree indoor wheel off trainer...
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  11. #11
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    I didn't get any flats either this Winter, 60 degree indoor wheel off trainer...
    Sounds horrible.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  12. #12
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    Within the limited constraints of a single "small puncture on a fast descent", yes, a tubeless setup is safer.

    In a tire cut, or even a large puncture, the end result will be the same, with the tubed setup being considerably less messy to clean up afterwards.

    Personally, I'm not running road tubeless (anything less than 32mm gets tubes). I tried it, but didn't care for the tire/rim compatibility stuff that manufacturers haven't been able or willing to resolve yet, and just the general mess that tubeless brings with it.

    Once there is an industry standard for high pressure road tubeless wheels and tires, that makes it feasible to run any tubeless tire on any tubeless rim (within reason) safely (no fears of blow-offs, etc...) I may re-visit.

    I do run tubeless on my gravel wheels (same bikes) that are 32mm or wider, as the lower pressures seem to diminish the bead/hook/hookless compatibility concerns. Plus, there are some really good tubeless options in those wider sets (both rims and tires) that make it worth the hassle.

  13. #13
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    It's funny.....all the same 'safety advantages' you mention are the same for tubulars......without the awful mess of sealant!
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    It's funny.....all the same 'safety advantages' you mention are the same for tubulars......without the awful mess of sealant!
    But then there is that while 6 "messy glue" thing...

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