Rene Herse tires?
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  1. #1
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    Rene Herse tires?

    I'm looking around for something better for my touring/gravel bike, and I came across Rene Herse Snoqualmie Pass tire. Looks like what I'm looking for; wide but not into 'huge' sizes, minimal tread, etc. Don't find a lot of tires in that 45-55mm range. But, they are rather pricey, and before I pay that amount for a pair of tires, I'd like to know how durable (or flat-prone) they are. Also, are there any other tires like that in that size range?
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  2. #2
    Adorable Furry Hombre
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    I've seen a few user reviews...I'd categorize them as "dangerously thin". Seriously, 380 grams for a 44mm tire is nuts. Probably gloriously supple, but eeek. None of my roads are that sharp-free nor are my dirt roads all dirt.

    A few other options....

    -Specialized Sawtooth is 700x42mm. 600ish grams, and not that supple TBH. But they wear like iron and are very puncture resistant, and they're $40USD at my LBS. They'll also bead-seat with a floor-pump. IRL measure 43mm on my 21.5mm internal rims.

    -Terrene Honali comes in 700x50...but heavier at 700grams....and only available manufacturer direct, and aren't much cheaper than Rene Herse.
    ridinggravel.com/components/tires/terrene-tires-honali-50mm-getting-rolling/
    Terrene Tires Honali 50mm: Checkpoint -
    Terrene Tires Honali 50mm: At The Finish -
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    They do appear thin, but they really aren't prone to damage at all. There are several pro gravel racers using them non-sponsored.

    I've been riding various sizes of them on all of my bikes on surfaces ranging from technical washboard gravel to silky smooth tarmac I have not had a single issue over 6500 or so miles.

    I've also heard people say they don't wear well, but ive been pleasantly surprised at how well they are wearing.

    They aren't cheap, but they are great tires. They have converted me from a hardcore Conti 4000/5000 user to being all in on Compass/Rene Herse.

    My road bike is on 28s, and I've run everything from 32 to 38 on my Norco and Moots gravel bikes.

    I'm completely enamored with them...

    Bottom line, they are worth a try.

    Edit: ugh, so many typos. I don't do well with phone keyboards...
    Last edited by Finx; 06-15-2019 at 09:09 PM.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    I've been riding 650b Baby Shoe Pass 42mm tires for 20,000 miles now and I'm not even interested in experimenting with any other tires. I can't say how many tires this has been, but I did push one to 8,000 miles and never had a flat. 4000 on the front then 3988 on the rear till I saw the cord.
    One flat in the 1st 18,000 miles but three in the last 2,000. A rear, a front and then another rear. I retired the front because it was a slow leak and I rode the tire soft for quite a few miles and managed to damage the cord.

    Mostly pavement with some gravel roads thrown in.
    Too old to ride plastic

  5. #5
    [REDACTED]
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    You didn't say what tire you are using now that you aren't happy with.

    As far as the Rene Herse (f.k.a. Compass) Snoqualmie Pass:

    https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop...oqualmie-pass/

    .....I would agree that the extralight casing version is probably paper thin and will bring headaches. I would go with the standard casing version.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  6. #6
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    The standard casing is what I've been using. I'm afraid to try the extralight's, not for fear of the thinner casing, but for fear of a ride that I wouldn't want to give up, and the EL's are pricier than I'd be comfortable spending.

    One of these days I am going to try them tho.

    I put a set of the Stampede Pass 700/32mm standard on my wifes bike. She's pretty non denominational about her tires, will ride about anything so long as it roles, and she even commented about how nice they ride. She's even allowing me to run the pressure lower than she had previously preferred.
    Too old to ride plastic

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Just saw this on e-bay. They're not exactly what you're looking for but a couple of Barlow Pass EL's(38mm). $66.25 each, or best offer. That's about the price of the standard casing, but he may be willing to take a low bid.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Compass-Ren...QAAOSwplBc9ULo

    If you're not interested Finx may be.

    PS...I don't know nor am I affiliated with the seller, just passing along info.
    Too old to ride plastic

  8. #8
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    I've been using the extra lite casing BonJon Pass tire with tubes and had one flat in the rain on pavement from a thorn that probably would have flatted a Conti 4000SII tire also. If I was running them tubeless, sealant would have kept me riding for sure. They do feel pretty thin to me for gravel riding, no personal experience to base that on though. It really depends quite a bit on the type of gravel you are riding though. I would be use their smooth tread tires on something like the Katy Trail in Missouri which has more of a crushed rock on it.
    Gravel Rocks

    Trek Domane
    Niner RLT9 (Gravel Bike)
    Trek Crockett

  9. #9
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    Rene Herse tires?

    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    I'm looking around for something better for my touring/gravel bike, and I came across Rene Herse Snoqualmie Pass tire. Looks like what I'm looking for; wide but not into 'huge' sizes, minimal tread, etc. Don't find a lot of tires in that 45-55mm range. But, they are rather pricey, and before I pay that amount for a pair of tires, I'd like to know how durable (or flat-prone) they are. Also, are there any other tires like that in that size range?
    I've got those tires, but wouldn't recommend running them tubeless. The beads stretch, casing bleeds sealant, and my rear tire formed a bubble, so I sent it back as defective. On the positive side, they are light, round, and have good rolling resistance. They are a bit noisy on pavement though.

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