Roval wheels - donít like my new bike?
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  1. #1
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    Roval wheels - donít like my new bike?

    I have a set of Roval CLX50s. I used them on a Specialized Venge Vias for a few years. I had some mild high speed wobble a few times, but it was always on a really cold descent and I chalked it up to shivering.

    I replaced the Venge size 58 with a Parlee RZ7 size Large (57), have had more frequent and more pronounced high speed wobble, but again on cold descents. Once on a pretty mild day and it was bad enough that I pulled over and checked that my tires has air and everything was tight.

    Yesterday, it happened REALLY BAD during hot weather. I was doing 40+ mph on an average road with normal imperfections. I was certain I was going down, but managed managed to brake to a stop. The two guys with me were behind me at that point and both said it was shocking to see an entire bike shaking like that.

    I've seen comments occasionally about ďwouldnít trust themĒ in reference to Roval wheels, caused a little concern, but now Iím wondering about those comments.

    Is it the wheels? Is it the wheels with that specific bike? Iím thinking about putting gravel tires on them and using them on my gravel bike due to lower speeds.

    Is there concern with Roval wheels being too light or too few spokes or something and therefore unreliable at speed?
    Last edited by multirider; 2 Weeks Ago at 11:26 AM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by multirider View Post
    I have a set of Roval CLX50s. I used them on a Specialized Venge Vias for a few years. I had some mild high speed wobble a few times, but it was always on a really cold descent and I chalked it up to shivering.

    I replaced the Venge size 58 with a Parlee RZ7 size Large (57), have had more frequent and more pronounced high speed wobble, but again on cold descents. Once on a pretty mild day and it was bad enough that I pulled over and checked that my tires has air and everything was tight.

    Yesterday, it happened REALLY BAD during hot weather. I was doing 40+ mph on an average road with normal imperfections. I was certain I was going down, but managed managed to brake to a stop. The two guys with me were behind me at that point and both said it was shocking to see an entire bike shaking like that.

    I've seen comments occasionally about ďwouldnít trust themĒ in reference to Roval wheels, caused a little concern, but now Iím wondering about those comments.

    Is it the wheels? Is it the wheels with that specific bike? Iím thinking about putting gravel tires on them and using them on my gravel bike due to lower speeds.

    Is there concern with Roval wheels being too light or too few spokes or something and therefore unreliable at speed?
    I haven't heard specific speed wobble concerns about those wheels but that doesn't mean they aren't the source of the problem. As a simple experiment, swap wheels with somebody just before a descent and see if the problem shifts to their bike. Possible but not likely as speed wobble is a result of a combination of things. Have you tried clamping the top tube between your knees when you are experiencing the wobble? This is often the most effective remedy.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    I haven't heard specific speed wobble concerns about those wheels but that doesn't mean they aren't the source of the problem. As a simple experiment, swap wheels with somebody just before a descent and see if the problem shifts to their bike. Possible but not likely as speed wobble is a result of a combination of things. Have you tried clamping the top tube between your knees when you are experiencing the wobble? This is often the most effective remedy.
    I second this, it works.
    Too old to ride plastic

  4. #4
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    I should note that I do not like high speeds. Over about 38 or 39 mph, I start getting really unhappy. But I am rather competitive and typically willing to do whatever it takes to keep up with whoever Iím riding with.

    I have a friend who has the same wheels and weighs about the same or that I do, he was on a Trek Madone with those wheels and now is on a Specialized venge, he has many downhill KOMs and is superfast , when I ask him about it, he said he loves them and has never had any issues like that.

    I donít clearly recall the sequence of events, I have heard about clamping the top tube with your knees, I think I tried that, but I may have only done it the first couple times, did not have the presence of mind to do it last time when it got so bad. Not sure.

    When descending at high speeds, that is to say speeds that make you nervous whatever that might be, is there anything you make a point of doing? Perhaps drop in your heels? I do that on a mountain bike, not sure if it is applicable on a road bike. More weight on the bars? Less, move forward on the saddle? Back?

    I keep thinking itís the wheels, but it may be me.

  5. #5
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    A light grip on the bars. The tighter you grip the bars the worse the shimmy. Shimmy at speed sucks, but you have to keep your wits about. A loose grip and a knee, or both, on the top tube. No need to wait for a shimmy to start, put a knee on the top tube and keep a loose grip as soon as the speed on a down hill starts picking up, get in front of things before they start.
    Too old to ride plastic

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    I love downhills at speed. I've gone over 50 mph any number of times and my fastest is just under 60 mph. But more even then speed, I love long downhills with corners. The more technical the better.

    For me the main points are get low in the drops and stay loose on the bike. Maybe shift my weight slightly back if I'm on sketchy pavement or gravel. Otherwise it's straight into the superman tuck for me.

    If you are nervous I suppose there is a good chance that you are tightening up too much. Loosen up and let the bike go down the hill. Pretend you're just along for the ride.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.R. View Post
    I love downhills at speed. I've gone over 50 mph any number of times and my fastest is just under 60 mph. But more even then speed, I love long downhills with corners. The more technical the better.

    For me the main points are get low in the drops and stay loose on the bike. Maybe shift my weight slightly back if I'm on sketchy pavement or gravel. Otherwise it's straight into the superman tuck for me.

    If you are nervous I suppose there is a good chance that you are tightening up too much. Loosen up and let the bike go down the hill. Pretend you're just along for the ride.
    I agree with you and velodog above, sounds like the op is a little apprehensive on the downhills...Nothing wrong with that, it's not like we're wearing full leathers, just don't white-knuckle the bars, be as smooth as possible, and slow down before the turns.
    Lennard Zinn has a bunch of articles on velonews.com on high-speed shimmy situations also.
    In reference to the Assault on Mt Mitchell...
    Quote Originally Posted by merckx56
    The easier solution is to find a biker bar in Spartanburg the night before, go in and pick a fight. The ass-whipping you'll get will be far less painful than the one Mitchell will give you the next day!

  8. #8
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    I found an article by Lennard Zinn, very interesting. I have a few of the characteristics he talks about as Iím 6í1Ē tall and riding a Large frame with a fair amount of seatpost exposed.

    This past weekendís ride was the first time with a shorter stem (90mm instead of 110mm). I really like the bike fit with the shorter stem at 35mph and under, but it seems like the shorter stem results in more wheel movement for a given amount of bar movement. That might amplify resonance and make the high speed wobble worse. Could that be the source of the death wobble?

    But I really like the shorter stem.

    I did a ride on Tuesday with ENVE 5.6 wheels where I touched 40mph several times. No speed wobble, kind of a sensation that felt like maybe the beginning of a wobble, but in addition to different wheels, it was a different road and I was consciously bringing my knees to the top tube to stabilize the bike. Thus, I changed multiple things and it may or may not have been a good test. I really dislike going that fast.

    Iíve hit 50mph several times in the past in a large peloton on other bikes such as the Specialized Venge. I didnít enjoy it, could hardly wait for it to be over, but no death wobble. After experiencing an actual death wobble, I dislike high speed more than ever.
    Last edited by multirider; 2 Weeks Ago at 02:47 PM.

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