stress relieving wheels?
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  1. #1
    No Crybabies
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    stress relieving wheels?

    When I'm building, I do a lot of stress relieving along the way. I put on the leather glove and squeeze spoke pairs together; I do the screwdriver pry thing; I take the wheel and push down on the rim while it lies flat on the axle.

    Finally, after fully tensioning, as part of a "test," too, I take the wheel, put it down on the floor on a carpet, and stand on the rim on opposite sides while the wheel sits solely on the axle (I'm 165 pounds). I figure that if it can stand that, it must be pretty strong. Is that too much stress, though? I typically hear some minor creaks and pings the first time, but then they are gone after I check trueness again. Thanks.
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  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    sounds like it might be a bit of overkill. But if you arent damaging it then go for it.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    I wouldn't advocate standing on the rim because it is difficult to control, compared to using your hands. But it sounds like you are generally doing the right things. If the wheel remains true after a "forceful" stress relieving then it should stay that way.

  4. #4
    Online Wheel Builder
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    The way i stress relieve all the wheels I build is by running them over in my car. I like to try and hit them at about 75 MPH. I find that at that speed I get great stress relief.

  5. #5
    More cowbell!
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    Standing on the rim is overkill. Side loading with your hands is good. You de-tension the spokes just enough that if there is some wind-up it will release.
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  6. #6
    foothillsbass
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    I find that drinking beer while I'm building wheels helps relieve stress while I stress-relieve.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Old school

    Quote Originally Posted by Fixed
    When I'm building, I do a lot of stress relieving along the way. I put on the leather glove and squeeze spoke pairs together; I do the screwdriver pry thing; I take the wheel and push down on the rim while it lies flat on the axle.

    Finally, after fully tensioning, as part of a "test," too, I take the wheel, put it down on the floor on a carpet, and stand on the rim on opposite sides while the wheel sits solely on the axle (I'm 165 pounds). I figure that if it can stand that, it must be pretty strong. Is that too much stress, though? I typically hear some minor creaks and pings the first time, but then they are gone after I check trueness again. Thanks.
    Back in the day, there were stories about old Italian mechanics who would take their newly built wheels out into the courtyard, lay them on their sides, and walk on them. You're carrying on a fine (but pretty superfluous) tradition.

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