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  1. #1
    bas
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    Tire wall gave out and tube split long wise half way around?

    The tire is at least 10 years old, 80 psi , 26x2.0, tube was 3 weeks old or so.

    I pumped up the tire this morning to 80 psi.

    I came outside to this mess today. 92F, probably 100F or more on the tarmac there.

    Tire wall gave out and tube split long wise half way around?-37005724_10213688471138450_7690151626526425088_o.jpg

    I started investigating, tube was split here around the top to the valve stem on the far left 10pm.

    Tire wall gave out and tube split long wise half way around?-36893591_10213688471378456_755174517583642624_o.jpg

    I pulled it out to investigate.

    Tire wall gave out and tube split long wise half way around?-36913567_10213688471938470_2206223055259172864_o.jpg

    I tried with new tube, but didn't have a good feeling. As soon after pumping it up - it was holding - then the tube would just pop out. lol

    Tire wall gave out and tube split long wise half way around?-37016328_10213688472418482_6136226475944181760_o.jpg


    This reminds me now - I did see a slight unexplained wobble (nothing out of ordinary) when reviewing bike video lately. So maybe the sidewall did give out first in the parking lot - and then the tube got cut along with the way.


    80psi 26x2.0 tires are a little hard to come by, I might have to go to Hutchinson directly. PerformanceBike hasn't carried them in a while. I'd really like to move the front 80 psi tire to the rear, but now I'm worried about breaking the sidewall on that. I have some 45-60psi tires from 10 years ago I never really cared for ("less rolling resistance" but I could never tell because I always felt slower than being on 80 psi tires).

    I just love these shimano low spoke count rims. Very solid and never had a problem.

  2. #2
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    80psi in a 2.0" tire?!? Here's a pro tip: You shouldn't be putting 80psi or anywhere near it in a 2.0" tire. Google 'Boyle's law' and you'll (hopefully) understand why. That tire when new would probably hold 80 for a bit, but an old dried out tire isn't going to take it. If you're riding 80psi on dirt you're crazy. If you're riding that tire w/ 80psi on pavement you're in need of some different tires.
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  3. #3
    bas
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    80psi in a 2.0" tire?!? Here's a pro tip: You shouldn't be putting 80psi or anywhere near it in a 2.0" tire. Google 'Boyle's law' and you'll (hopefully) understand why. That tire when new would probably hold 80 for a bit, but an old dried out tire isn't going to take it. If you're riding 80psi on dirt you're crazy. If you're riding that tire w/ 80psi on pavement you're in need of some different tires.

    I will google that when I wake up and try to compute.

    These tires are marked for 80psi, as that was their deal.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bas View Post
    I will google that when I wake up and try to compute.

    These tires are marked for 80psi, as that was their deal.
    Just because the tires can handle 80PSI doesn't mean the rims are designed for that. Also keep in mind that the pressure stated on the side of a tire is the maximum, not a recommended pressure.

    There is absolutely no reason to pump up a 2.0" tire to 80PSI unless you are over 300lbs. It will ride like cr@p at that pressure to say the least. There is this myth that higher pressure will always make you go faster. It won't. 40-50PSI is plenty for these tires.

    Overinflation is the reason this tire failed.
    Last edited by Lombard; 07-11-2018 at 03:02 AM.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    unless you are over 300lbs.
    U don't know that.
    Rubber tires are not eternal, 10 years is way over their expected life.
    I think the recommended tire life is about 7 years, if you keep them in a cool dark place.
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  6. #6
    changingleaf
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    80 PSI! way too much.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bas View Post

    These tires are marked for 80psi, as that was their deal.
    And (some) road tires are marked 145.

    Pretty much ignore what's written on tires unless, maybe, you are on a track.

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    user error

  9. #9
    bas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Just because the tires can handle 80PSI doesn't mean the rims are designed for that. Also keep in mind that the pressure stated on the side of a tire is the maximum, not a recommended pressure.

    There is absolutely no reason to pump up a 2.0" tire to 80PSI unless you are over 300lbs. It will ride like cr@p at that pressure to say the least. There is this myth that higher pressure will always make you go faster. It won't. 40-50PSI is plenty for these tires.
    I used to run the Hutchinson Python Gold Elite at 80psi before these regular Hutchinson Python's.

    Have you ridden these type of tires at 80psi to know they DON'T roll better at that pressure than 50PSI? I have. Once they lose pressure after a couple days - the difference is great.

    I'm on the street if you need to take that into calculation - not off road.

    Maybe my pump is a little off calibrated, but unlikely.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    U don't know that.
    Rubber tires are not eternal, 10 years is way over their expected life.
    I think the recommended tire life is about 7 years, if you keep them in a cool dark place.
    There is no hard rule about this. Tires can get dry rot in 2 years and they can also last 10 years without getting dry rot. It all depends on a number of factors like tire compound and conditions they are stored under. Tires do not magically turn into a pumpkin at a set time.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bas View Post
    I used to run the Hutchinson Python Gold Elite at 80psi before these regular Hutchinson Python's.

    Have you ridden these type of tires at 80psi to know they DON'T roll better at that pressure than 50PSI? I have. Once they lose pressure after a couple days - the difference is great.

    I'm on the street if you need to take that into calculation - not off road.

    Maybe my pump is a little off calibrated, but unlikely.
    It is highly unlikely that your tires roll better at 80PSI than they do at 50PSI, unless as I said before, you weigh over 300lbs. You didn't tell us your weight, but correct PSI is largely determined by total weight of the rider, bike and whatever else is on board. I am guessing that you feel like you are rolling faster at 80 PSI because you have a much rougher ride.

    If you are really hell bent on riding these tires at 80PSI, you will need to get some rims that are designed to handle that pressure.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  12. #12
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    I had a set of Conti Sprinters, and they were marked for 175 psi maximum....so I tried to pump them up all the way. Got to 160 psig with my pump, then took it for a ride. Felt like I was riding on bare rims.

    BTW, my gravel bike has 45mm tires (as opposed to your 52mm tires), and I weigh 170 lbs. I keep the front at 35 psig, and the rear at 40.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    There is no hard rule about this.
    His tire blew out while he was within the tire rating, what do you think happened?
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  14. #14
    Adorable Furry Hombre
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    His tire blew out while he was within the tire rating, what do you think happened?

    What was the rim rated for? I can have a tire rated for 150PSI...but a rim rated to 80PSI means no bueno
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  15. #15
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    I had a set of Conti Sprinters, and they were marked for 175 psi maximum....so I tried to pump them up all the way. Got to 160 psig with my pump, then took it for a ride. Felt like I was riding on bare rims.

    BTW, my gravel bike has 45mm tires (as opposed to your 52mm tires), and I weigh 170 lbs. I keep the front at 35 psig, and the rear at 40.
    I'm the same weight as you and that sounds perfect to me.
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  16. #16
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bas View Post
    I used to run the Hutchinson Python Gold Elite at 80psi before these regular Hutchinson Python's.

    Have you ridden these type of tires at 80psi to know they DON'T roll better at that pressure than 50PSI? I have. Once they lose pressure after a couple days - the difference is great.

    I'm on the street if you need to take that into calculation - not off road.

    Maybe my pump is a little off calibrated, but unlikely.
    They're mtb tires. If you're riding them on the dirt at 80 you're stupid. If you're riding mtb tires on road...all the time...you're stupid. You should be road tires, what are you thinking riding these on the road? They don't have as much traction, the ride probably sucks big time. I absolutely don't need to try those tires at 80psi to know without a doubt that they would roll better at lower pressure. At that pressure and having that volume there is no way they are close to being as efficient as they could be with less pressure. This has nothing to do w/ how you 'feel' about the way they roll...you're so far over the correct pressure it's not even funny.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    His tire blew out while he was within the tire rating, what do you think happened?
    Did you miss the part in my post #4 about RIM rating? It doesn't matter if the tire is rated at 80PSI if the rim is rated at 50PSI, you can only put 50PSI in those tires.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  18. #18
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    His tire blew out while he was within the tire rating, what do you think happened?
    The tire had aged weakening the casing and this resulted in the casing splitting. OR the OP never adjusted his brake pads as they wore and they ended up cutting into the casing. Either way, why is he riding a mtb tire on the road at 80psi?
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  19. #19
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    From what I can see, the bead broke. Was it a 'folding' tire?

    To summarize, it was an old tire, way over-inflated, and possibly it wasn't manufactured well.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  20. #20
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    ..... and it wasn't the rim, regardless of over/under inflating.
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