Tubasti
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Thread: Tubasti

  1. #1
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    Tubasti

    (by Aldo Ross)

    Tubasti on the sidewalls
    Tubasti on the spokes
    Tubasti on the workbench
    And a bunch of cotter bolts

    Tubasti on the visegrips
    Tubasti on my arm
    Tubasti on my chin and cheek
    I hope it won't cause harm

    Tubasti on the light switch
    Tubasti on the cats
    Tubasti on my shoes and socks
    And on my car's floor mats

    Tubasti on the carpet
    Tubasti in my hair
    I tried to glue just one damn tire
    Now Tubasti's everywhere!
    Too old to ride plastic

  2. #2
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    Oh, man, you gotta get the Tubasti off the cats! FWIW, I USED to use this stuff only on my 'cold weather' wheelset, due to the fact it holds less and remains pliable at low temperatures, making tire changes on the road at least possible. Doesn't hold worth a crap in warmer temps, though, and is such a pain to clean off, that I just dedicated an old wheelset to the junk.

    To keep the mess at a minimum (especially for the cat's sake), I used to apply it to the wheel with a small disposable brush, then let it sit unmounted for 24 hours before trying to mount the tubular.

    BTW, I no longer use Tubasti, or any other gutta-type glue. At best, it only works half as well as any of the clear glues.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    (by Aldo Ross)

    Tubasti on the sidewalls
    Tubasti on the spokes
    Tubasti on the workbench
    And a bunch of cotter bolts

    Tubasti on the visegrips
    Tubasti on my arm
    Tubasti on my chin and cheek
    I hope it won't cause harm

    Tubasti on the light switch
    Tubasti on the cats
    Tubasti on my shoes and socks
    And on my car's floor mats

    Tubasti on the carpet
    Tubasti in my hair
    I tried to glue just one damn tire
    Now Tubasti's everywhere!
    I haven't been on sew-ups since 1998 and I think the last time I used Tubasti was in the '70s. Just about the worst hot weather rim cement out there. Lesson learned. I always preferred Vittoria cement. Brings back some memories.

  4. #4
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    BTW, get yourself a bottle of acetone; it does wonders on cleaning tubular glue off things (cat not included...).
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  5. #5
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    The first time I ever glued up a tubular, I got glue on the sidewall, on the rim, and all over my fingers. To make matters worse, I did this outside, sitting on my front step. While getting up, trying not to touch anything with my glued up fingers, I bumped the wheel, so that it rolled on to a freshly mowed lawn. I was able to get the grass and dirt off the sidewall, with solvent, but not the tire. It looked pretty funny.
    Vittoria glue on Vittoria's, and Conti glue on Conti's...(for some reason, Vittoria glue caused Conti base tape to loosen)
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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  6. #6
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    In 1971, my buddy found himself working at a high-end bicycle shop. The first time I went there to visit he gestured at the Tubasti in the case and announced it as the worst sew-up glue in history.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  7. #7
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    Sorry to hijack, but what percentage do you think are riding sewups these days? I used to think it was maybe 50% back in the 90s and early 2000s, but I can't recall the last time I saw one strapped to the saddle with a Binda toe strap or in a sock.

    As for the mess Tubasti made, I wasn't too fond of Clement Red either, and I was a Fast Tak user and that stuff never came off your hands.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    Sorry to hijack, but what percentage do you think are riding sewups these days? I used to think it was maybe 50% back in the 90s and early 2000s, but I can't recall the last time I saw one strapped to the saddle with a Binda toe strap or in a sock.

    As for the mess Tubasti made, I wasn't too fond of Clement Red either, and I was a Fast Tak user and that stuff never came off your hands.
    The wife currently uses sewups on both her Colnagos, but she is moving to clinchers for her soft-riding C59. The roads near our new home are just too laden with knife-edged debris to have to hassle with the rituals involved in mounting and tearing off the damn things...not to mention the expense. As for her totally beautiful Art Decor Aluminum Dream, she wants the extra touch of softness that only tubulars seem to be able to bring.

    I, on the other hand, simplified my bicycling life several years ago when I bought a Bianchi Infinito. The machine rides so gently, there's no need to worry about what you're rolling on.
    Last edited by Mapei; 05-10-2020 at 07:46 PM. Reason: Grammar
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  9. #9
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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    ooops, double tap
    #promechaniclife

  10. #10
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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    Over that last 30 years I've glued hundreds and hundreds of tires but I will never...ever...forget the first pair, which were mounted on the first pair of wheels I ever built, oddly enough. Let's just say the wheels came out much better than the tire install. Glue everywhere...hands, clothes, floor, ceiling, cat, wife. Conti Sprinters on Mavic GP4s. The guys at the shop made it sound so easy.

    As for glue I was warned about 'red' glues early on and have only had to use them a couple times. 99% of the time I've used Mastik 1.

    Anyone else here ever used shellac to mount tires? You think 2-3 coats of glue takes a while...hah! Try over a dozen coats of shellac.
    #promechaniclife

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    BTW, get yourself a bottle of acetone; it does wonders on cleaning tubular glue off things (cat not included...).
    Aromatic solvents work MUCH better than acetone. Xylene, toluene, etc. They work a treat. I used to dilute the glue with toluene, and then paint it on the rim and tire with a brush. Nice, even coat and no mess.

  12. #12
    What the Hell is going on
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    Tubasti. Yeah, that's the one. I didn't know it was such a terrible tubular glue. I never had a problem with it. I kinda liked that it was still pliable and didn't turn hard and crumble. I still ride tubulars. I have an '80's Colnago Export and an '86 Specialized Allez SE (just like Dr. Marcus Sommers). Anyway, you'd think with all this downtime I have I could start patching all my flatted tubular tires. C'est la Vie.
    You'd think we were here for something other than fun. - Ishmael

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    Wow. Haven't seen an American Flyers reference in some time.

  14. #14
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    I used to do all of my training on clinchers, and would save the tubulars for Criteriums and Road races.....Since I retired from racing in 2017, after 32 years, I haven't used my tubular wheels, except for a few times a year....Since they are glued on extremely tight, they take 10 to 15 minutes to remove....I'm not sure if I could even remove them on the side of the road. I got a little paranoid after rolling a tire on a high speed off camber down hill turn in a Crit.(after a pedal strike) It was on the bell, and I had a gap.
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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    Buying parts to hang on your bike is always easier than getting fit.

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  15. #15
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    I've been using tape for the last 20 years. I used that stuff once, strings everywhere.

  16. #16
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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    Quote Originally Posted by mackgoo View Post
    I've been using tape for the last 20 years. I used that stuff once, strings everywhere.
    Tape is for presents, glue is for tires. Aside from using nothing at all to hold the tire on tape is the absolute worst. There are still a ton of pro teams using tubulars and I can promise you w/ 100% certainty that precisely none of them use tape.
    #promechaniclife

  17. #17
    What the what???
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    I've always used tubes and clinchers. Thank you all for confirming that was the way to go.
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  18. #18
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    I'm sure the pro teams use glue, they probably have a team which their only task is to prep wheels.
    Doesn't change the fact I've been using tape for decades and I've never rolled a tire.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569 View Post
    I've always used tubes and clinchers. Thank you all for confirming that was the way to go.
    There was a time, more than 30 years ago, if you wanted a performance tire then your only real option was tubulars. That time has LONG passed. I rode sew-ups for 30 years then switched to clinchers in the late 90s. Never, not once, have I looked back.

  20. #20
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    Tape is good for triathletes, or for people who never take a corner in anger.
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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    How would you like it if Hitler killed you
    Dogbert.

    I>U

    Buying parts to hang on your bike is always easier than getting fit.

    If you feel wimpy and weak, get out and train more, ya wee lassie!

    If Jesus had a gun, he'd be alive today!

  21. #21
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    The first racing clincher was the Specialized Turbo. It was advertised and marked as a 700x25, but it really was a 20.....It came out somewhere around 1985. Everyone had to have them, along with Avocet model 20, and then model 30 bike computers (I still have some of those round pick up magnets to fit 28 and 32 spoke wheels)
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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    How would you like it if Hitler killed you
    Dogbert.

    I>U

    Buying parts to hang on your bike is always easier than getting fit.

    If you feel wimpy and weak, get out and train more, ya wee lassie!

    If Jesus had a gun, he'd be alive today!

  22. #22
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    I sometimes wonder if some people here have ever ridden a bike. It seems all they do is regurgitate what they've read or heard.

  23. #23
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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    Quote Originally Posted by mackgoo View Post
    I sometimes wonder if some people here have ever ridden a bike. It seems all they do is regurgitate what they've read or heard.
    You directing that at me?

    My opinions are based on nearly 30 years of tubular experience. I've mounted well over 1000 tires in the last 10-12 years alone. I have been one of those pro team mechanics that glues tires constantly. I have seen numerous tires that were taped (barely) on wheels that would have come off in the first corner of a crit. I get that not everyone's experience is the same but I've seen a bit more than the average guy and what I've seen forms my opinion that tubular tape absolutely sucks. If it worked well it would be embraced by team mechanics everywhere, no doubt it's much easier and cleaner than glue. The fact it that it doesn't work well in the vast, overwhelming majority of cases. I wouldn't feel strongly about it if it was 'ok'...but in my experience it's bad...really bad.
    #promechaniclife

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    You directing that at me?

    My opinions are based on nearly 30 years of tubular experience. I've mounted well over 1000 tires in the last 10-12 years alone. I have been one of those pro team mechanics that glues tires constantly. I have seen numerous tires that were taped (barely) on wheels that would have come off in the first corner of a crit. I get that not everyone's experience is the same but I've seen a bit more than the average guy and what I've seen forms my opinion that tubular tape absolutely sucks. If it worked well it would be embraced by team mechanics everywhere, no doubt it's much easier and cleaner than glue. The fact it that it doesn't work well in the vast, overwhelming majority of cases. I wouldn't feel strongly about it if it was 'ok'...but in my experience it's bad...really bad.
    While my experience was only personal in 30 years of riding sew-ups combined with that of a few riding buddies, it was exactly the same. Tape seems like a good idea, but in practice, it has not been. YMMV.

  25. #25
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    Interesting. My experience is only personal too. The only tub I ever rolled was in 72 or so, and oh yeah it was glued. All my bikes I ride today, whether cyclocross or road have taped tubulars. You'd think running the cyclocross at 25, 30 psi I'd never be able to keep a tire on the rim according to the sentiment here.

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