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Thread: Tubeless road?

  1. #26
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    For me road tubeless is more about safety than puncture protection. If you are on fast descent sealant, even if it doesn't seal hole completely, will in many cases slow down air leak significant and allow you safe stop.

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  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by smokva View Post
    For me road tubeless is more about safety than puncture protection. If you are on fast descent sealant, even if it doesn't seal hole completely, will in many cases slow down air leak significant and allow you safe stop.

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    This ^.

    Also, even if you did have a catastrophic sudden loss of pressure (huge gash) on that bombing descent, the tubeless tire will stay securely mounted on the rim until you can come to a stop. If this happens with tubed clinchers you run the risk the tire coming off the rim, getting wrapped in the fork/breaks and you eating pavement in spectacular fashion.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooskull View Post
    This ^.

    Also, even if you did have a catastrophic sudden loss of pressure (huge gash) on that bombing descent, the tubeless tire will stay securely mounted on the rim until you can come to a stop. If this happens with tubed clinchers you run the risk the tire coming off the rim, getting wrapped in the fork/breaks and you eating pavement in spectacular fashion.
    True that tubeless is safer in protecting you from a catastrophic loss of air pressure, especially if you're a bigger rider. But the newer breed of rims are "tubeless ready" and that means they also have the deeper hook to grab even regular clincher tires. Ever notice how regular clinchers mount harder on a tubeless rim than a non-tubeless rim?

    Having said that, I honestly think your chances of crashing by rubbing wheel with a mate or running into a rut or sliding out over dirt is higher than crashing due to a tire blowout in a descent. I have had exactly 1 flat in a descent in my entire road cycling career and the tire did not come peeling off in spectacular fashion like I had imagined. On the mtb, I've also one blowout in a descent while using tubeless setup and the front tire peeled off completely leaving with me metal rim on granite rock, down I went but falling on the dirt is much easier than falling on pavement.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    But the newer breed of rims are "tubeless ready" and that means they also have the deeper hook to grab even regular clincher tires. Ever notice how regular clinchers mount harder on a tubeless rim than a non-tubeless rim?
    What you're saying is true, but the reason is not because of the bead hook design but because of tubeless rim bed design. There are two separate issues at play here. One, how easy a tire is to mount ("mounting" being defined as the process of getting the tire beads over the rim walls) is a solely a function of how deep the center channel is in the rim bed- the deeper the channel, the easier it is to mount.

    Two, is the issue of how well the tire will stay put once the beads are set (ie. the tire is inflated so that tire beads rest on the bead shelf and not in the channel). How tightly the tire stays on the bead shelf is a function of the bead shelf diameter- the larger the diameter the tighter the fit. Tubeless rims tend to have a slightly larger bead shelf diameter so that tubeless tires are less likely blow off the rim. This incidentally is the reason tubeless rims often loose 10-40% of their spoke tension when the tire beads are set but the tire isn't even inflated; the rim is getting compressed by the uber tight tire bead. Additionally some tubeless rims even have a shelf ridge to keep the tire from falling back into the center channel when deflated, which would also help keep the tire beads stay set and not dismount in a sudden pressure loss situation.

    One other relevant point: Tubeless tires have carbon fiber beads which don't stretch over time like tubed clinchers which have kevlar beads. This means tubeless tires are just a big PITA to unseat/dismount at the end of their life as they were when new, while tubed clinchers get easier to dismount- and potentially blow off the rim- with age.

  5. #30
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    I've been running tubeless on the mountain bike for a year or so now and I definitely do not see myself going back to tubed in that application, but I can see the drawbacks of running tubeless on the road. All the negatives that have been brought up kind of balance out the advantages that others have mentioned so for now I'll be sticking to tubes on the road. In conclusion, I am too lazy to go out of my way and convert my road wheels to tubeless.

  6. #31
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    This is the best explanation of why tubeless tires are so hard to mount.
    I have been wondering if the rims were actually larger diameter.
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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poppadaddio View Post
    This is the best explanation of why tubeless tires are so hard to mount.
    I have been wondering if the rims were actually larger diameter.
    What is the best explanation? You haven't quoted a post or provided a link...
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