Which tubeless tires
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  1. #1
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    Which tubeless tires

    I picked up a set of tubeless ready wheels for my road bike, and I'm deciding which tubeless tires I want to run. I think I've narrowed it down to either the schwalbe pro one, or the Conti gp5000 but I suppose I could possibly be convinced otherwise. Has anyone here ridden both that could give their impressions? I think I'm prob going to get 25mm width, 28's will fit but they are a snug fit in the forks.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks,
    "The American people elected Donald Trump as the President of the United States, and not Hillary. I don't think the left is taking this loss as well as they could have"...

  2. #2
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    I've used the Pro Ones (on Campag Shamal 2wf) since they came out. I like them a lot, but they are a racing tyre so fatigue life is not long.
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbwh View Post
    I've used the Pro Ones (on Campag Shamal 2wf) since they came out. I like them a lot, but they are a racing tyre so fatigue life is not long.
    Thanks for the reply. When you say "not long", what do you mean? 1000 miles?
    "The American people elected Donald Trump as the President of the United States, and not Hillary. I don't think the left is taking this loss as well as they could have"...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbwh View Post
    fatigue life is not long.
    Please explain what you mean by "fatigue life" when it comes to bicycle tires. Tires wear out, they don't fatigue.

  5. #5
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    My current fave is the Pro One, fast and supple, but I've also used Hutchinson Fusions without a complaint and have a Hutch. Galactik (?) in the wings ready to try. I've also used Giant Gavia's, and though they seem to wear well, they have more of a dead feel. I'm really excited about trying the GP5K TL when I can find a deal.
    In reference to the Assault on Mt Mitchell...
    Quote Originally Posted by merckx56
    The easier solution is to find a biker bar in Spartanburg the night before, go in and pick a fight. The ass-whipping you'll get will be far less painful than the one Mitchell will give you the next day!

  6. #6
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    Which tubeless tires

    Schwalbe failing carcass syndrome, Kerry.

    I might have used the wrong term but then again hows your Norwegian?
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

  7. #7
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    My answer is none of the above. I managed around 3000 km on Pro Ones, but half a dozen punctures in that, some of which didn't seal. Switched to Hutchinson Fusions and they punctured 3 times in the first 200 km. The last straw for me was taking the bike into my local bike shop to have a cable replaced on the spot, and when I got on to test, got a puncture riding a figure of 8 in the car park. Though I managed to even top that when lifting the bike over the step to get it outside, and just the weight of setting it down again was enough to blow out one of the existing "seals".

    I'm a lightish rider (65 kg), but in my experience, not only do tubeless puncture more often (and a LOT more often), when they do seal, those seals won't hold longer term. I get it for mountain bikes, where the pressures are a lot lower, but I feel like if you're running anything more than 50 - 60 psi, they're not reliable, at least on the back wheel - though I was puncturing fronts as well.

    Whole experience was disastrous for me.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by upstateSC-rider View Post
    My current fave is the Pro One, fast and supple, but I've also used Hutchinson Fusions without a complaint and have a Hutch. Galactik (?) in the wings ready to try. I've also used Giant Gavia's, and though they seem to wear well, they have more of a dead feel. I'm really excited about trying the GP5K TL when I can find a deal.
    Thx for the input. I checked out the fusions and they are half the price of the GP5's, how many miles have you got out of the hutchinsons?
    "The American people elected Donald Trump as the President of the United States, and not Hillary. I don't think the left is taking this loss as well as they could have"...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bing181 View Post
    My answer is none of the above. I managed around 3000 km on Pro Ones, but half a dozen punctures in that, some of which didn't seal. Switched to Hutchinson Fusions and they punctured 3 times in the first 200 km. The last straw for me was taking the bike into my local bike shop to have a cable replaced on the spot, and when I got on to test, got a puncture riding a figure of 8 in the car park. Though I managed to even top that when lifting the bike over the step to get it outside, and just the weight of setting it down again was enough to blow out one of the existing "seals".

    I'm a lightish rider (65 kg), but in my experience, not only do tubeless puncture more often (and a LOT more often), when they do seal, those seals won't hold longer term. I get it for mountain bikes, where the pressures are a lot lower, but I feel like if you're running anything more than 50 - 60 psi, they're not reliable, at least on the back wheel - though I was puncturing fronts as well.

    Whole experience was disastrous for me.
    Thx for the input. I run into a lot of small wires on the road (steel belts from car tires?), my typical rides I get wires stuck in the tire and end up changing a tube, in fact I don't remember the last ride I had that I didn't replace a tube. My last ride before winter I ended up flatting my backup tube also and ended up calling my daughter for a ride. So I'm going to give tubeless a try and hope that it works better for me.
    "The American people elected Donald Trump as the President of the United States, and not Hillary. I don't think the left is taking this loss as well as they could have"...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by davesupra View Post
    Thx for the input. I checked out the fusions and they are half the price of the GP5's, how many miles have you got out of the hutchinsons?
    Had 1600 miles before I put her up for winter zwifting, starting to square off but nothing significant. Unlike the gp4k's, reports say the 5k's run truer to size so I may go to a monster-truck size of 28mm when I do switch.

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A5010 using Tapatalk
    In reference to the Assault on Mt Mitchell...
    Quote Originally Posted by merckx56
    The easier solution is to find a biker bar in Spartanburg the night before, go in and pick a fight. The ass-whipping you'll get will be far less painful than the one Mitchell will give you the next day!

  11. #11
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    I brought my wheels in (bontrager) to have them checked out before the season starts here, and the trek dealership had these rubbery-plastic rim strips that are made to be run tubeless. Has anyone else tried these? I picked them up and will give them a shot instead of taping the rims with the stans tape. I got them mounted and they are pretty slick, hopefully they work as well as they look.
    "The American people elected Donald Trump as the President of the United States, and not Hillary. I don't think the left is taking this loss as well as they could have"...

  12. #12
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    I remember the early eighties where if you just looked sternly at your road bike the tires went flat.

  13. #13
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    Keep us informed on the Bontragers. I'm interested in getting a set of Aeolus Pro 3Vs.

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    Small wires on the road

    Quote Originally Posted by davesupra View Post
    Thx for the input. I run into a lot of small wires on the road (steel belts from car tires?), So I'm going to give tubeless a try and hope that it works better for me.
    My 2 flats this year has been with those small wires on the road, on my tire with tubes. I also found 2 of these small wires on my tubeless tire. Pulled them out and sealant sealed up nicely.

  15. #15
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    Which sealant are you running?
    What rim are you running?

    I'm a heavier rider (80kg) and I usually inflate to 85psi (and let it go low until 55psi). I have managed 6700km on Schwalbe Pro One 28c. All punctures sealed without my knowledge and I used a half-half mixture of Orange Seal and Orange Seal Endurance. This on a hooked rim (HED Belgium+).

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fr0hickey View Post
    Keep us informed on the Bontragers. I'm interested in getting a set of Aeolus Pro 3Vs.
    Mine are an aluminum wheel, I don't remember which model off of the top of my head.
    "The American people elected Donald Trump as the President of the United States, and not Hillary. I don't think the left is taking this loss as well as they could have"...

  17. #17
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    I've had good luck with the 25c Hutchinson Fusion 5 all season on I9 wheels ( spec'd w/HED belgium rims IIRC, Blue tape). The grip and wear are really good. Rode Hell of Hunterton using them and no problems with pavement or gravel.

    I tried Bontrager TLR tires but was unhappy with durability and grip in wet. The 23c Bontragers I used have been discontinued, and I assume the new ones are better.

    I tried the Bontrager rim strip on some Pacenti rims but it was more hassle than wrapping with tape and very sensitive to getting damaged during tire installation.

    I have my Bontrager cross wheels (Aluminum rims) set up tubeless with Vittoria tires and two layers of tape. Works great

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bing181 View Post
    My answer is none of the above. I managed around 3000 km on Pro Ones, but half a dozen punctures in that, some of which didn't seal. Switched to Hutchinson Fusions and they punctured 3 times in the first 200 km. The last straw for me was taking the bike into my local bike shop to have a cable replaced on the spot, and when I got on to test, got a puncture riding a figure of 8 in the car park. Though I managed to even top that when lifting the bike over the step to get it outside, and just the weight of setting it down again was enough to blow out one of the existing "seals".

    I'm a lightish rider (65 kg), but in my experience, not only do tubeless puncture more often (and a LOT more often), when they do seal, those seals won't hold longer term. I get it for mountain bikes, where the pressures are a lot lower, but I feel like if you're running anything more than 50 - 60 psi, they're not reliable, at least on the back wheel - though I was puncturing fronts as well.

    Whole experience was disastrous for me.
    my experience has been similar as yours but to a lesser extent. One thing is for sure, it's almost never possible to get close to the full life of a tubeless tire (as tubeless). Once a tubeless tire has started to wear down past its midlife point, then old seals may break, or it's harder to seal new holes. Then you'll end up putting in a tube if you want to continue using the tire to the end of its life. This increases cost of use.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbwh View Post
    Schwalbe failing carcass syndrome, Kerry.

    I might have used the wrong term but then again hows your Norwegian?
    do you carry a potato in your pocket in case you meet a Swede??

  20. #20
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    Nonono. Im quite friendly to Swedes as well.
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    my experience has been similar as yours but to a lesser extent. One thing is for sure, it's almost never possible to get close to the full life of a tubeless tire (as tubeless). Once a tubeless tire has started to wear down past its midlife point, then old seals may break, or it's harder to seal new holes. Then you'll end up putting in a tube if you want to continue using the tire to the end of its life. This increases cost of use.
    My experience is very different from yours. I've only replaced my rear tire after 4200miles, and not once did I get a flat that I noticed. I wore out the rear tire to the point that it was squared-off. The question though, is if this worn tubeless tire is still ok to ride? Maybe for short rides around town with no descents and good weather. But I certainly would not want to keep riding on a worn tubeless (or tubed) tire on long rides.

  22. #22
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    I finally got around to installing my Schwalbe Pro one tires on the Bontrager wheels with the Bontrager rim strips. These rim strips are officially the spawn of satan. They are too thick in the middle of the rim where the spoke nipples are, which doesn't allow the tire to drop far enough into that area, the result is that you can't get the last ~10" of tire on the rim. After 45 minutes of struggle and bending the end of my park tool tire iron, I was finally able to get one side of the tire on. Once that one side was on, I was unable to spin the tire on the rim, because it was tight against the rim strip. I worked on getting the second side of the tire on, but quickly gave up. My next challenge was to get the one side of the tire back off of the rim. 20 minutes later and much swearing I finally got it back off.

    I removed the bontager rim strip and then put the tire back on the bare rim, it was a bit of work but no big deal. So, to make a short story long, I'll pick up some Stans tape and tape the wheel, as there is no way these rim strips are going to work.
    "The American people elected Donald Trump as the President of the United States, and not Hillary. I don't think the left is taking this loss as well as they could have"...

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