Tubes or Tubless, 28 or 32?
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  1. #1
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    Tubes or Tubless, 28 or 32?

    Hey Guys,

    Got a new bike recently that can accomodate wider tires (2019 Spec Roubaix Comp Di2). I've gotten enough miles to where it's time to replace the tires. Really just the rear is worn and I could rotate front to back but I am just going to get the set. It's currently got the stock specialized 28's with tubes, which were nice enough. Coming from 25's tubeless (GP5000's) on my last bike they seemed good. I am leaning towards the conti's again because I've always like the GP4000's and then the 5000's after them. The real questions for me are if 32's are worth running over 28's and if tubeless is worth the mounting hassle (especially if you flat on a ride) over tubes? Also, what are recommended pressures at these widths? I'm 240+ depending on clothing options and pre-ride hydration and meal. I previously ran 105psi on 23's and 90-95 on 25's.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    At your size 32 mm will make a notable difference. 32-33 mm is where tubeless starts to work well and become much more reliable.

  3. #3
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    I like the idea of tubeless however I believe they are impractical and a real pain in the kiester for true road bikes.. Changing tubes is just too easy.

  4. #4
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    A road bike tubeless question always creates a long debate between cons/benefits.

    I weighed 200-225 lbs. (Currently 185.) Have now ridden 32 tubeless tires for a couple years. Work well for me, but have never had a flat in the 19,000+ miles I've been using them. So, I haven't had to deal with the mess regarding a flat on a ride that many cite as a major negative to tubeless.

  5. #5
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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    Not worth it. I went back to tubes 7 years ago and I've had one flat since. No where near the advantages you get w/ mtb tubeless. I'm 100% for it on the mtb, 100% against it on the road bike.
    #promechaniclife

  6. #6
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    I agree that tubeless isn't worth it. I use tubes and I get less than one flat per year.

    At your weight, I say definitely go with 30 or 32mm tires. I use Vittoria Rubino Pros which are a good compromise between comfort and puncture resistance. They have these up to 30mm:

    https://www.vittoria.com/us/rubino-p...ance-race.html
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  7. #7
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    Might want to take a look at your tubes choice as well. I have found the latex tubes to be a better choice for their increased flexibility. Run them in my 28 road tires and I've run them in the low 30s with 32s and 34s on cross courses and had no issues. Yes, they are pricey, but so far I've found them to be worth it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by krisdrum View Post
    Might want to take a look at your tubes choice as well. I have found the latex tubes to be a better choice for their increased flexibility. Run them in my 28 road tires and I've run them in the low 30s with 32s and 34s on cross courses and had no issues. Yes, they are pricey, but so far I've found them to be worth it.
    They also lose air quicker than butyl tubes. Just saying.
    "COMPLACENCY IS LETHAL - VOTE in November." - System Shock.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    They also lose air quicker than butyl tubes. Just saying.
    True. So it is an extra minute? 2? pre-ride to check inflation and adjust as needed. I feel like most of us are checking our tires pre-ride regardless. Minor inconvenience in my experience. YMMV.

  10. #10
    MDM
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Not worth it. I went back to tubes 7 years ago and I've had one flat since. No where near the advantages you get w/ mtb tubeless. I'm 100% for it on the mtb, 100% against it on the road bike.
    What about for gravel/cyclocross? 50-50?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    They also lose air quicker than butyl tubes. Just saying.
    you should check pressure before each ride, and the ride quality of latex is worth the extra 30 seconds to top up.

  12. #12
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDM View Post
    What about for gravel/cyclocross? 50-50?
    For actual CX racing? Tubulars. I'm old fashioned so I'll say tubulars 90, tubeless 10. gravel, I'd go tubeless. Gravel tires are nearly the size of XC mtb tires, so tubeless works for me in that case. CX tires are relatively narrow and cornering speed is your friend, so tubulars can't be beat.
    #promechaniclife

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notvintage View Post
    you should check pressure before each ride, and the ride quality of latex is worth the extra 30 seconds to top up.
    I'm lazy and only check pressure if it's been 4 or 5 days since I last pumped up. In between, I check by giving the tires a squeeze.
    "COMPLACENCY IS LETHAL - VOTE in November." - System Shock.

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  14. #14
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    Too old to ride plastic

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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Lots of good info here which just confirms that I have no desire to try tubeless.

    *Harder to mount

    *Stiffer sidewalls negate any comfort advantages of being able to run less pressure.

    I can see the merits of running tubeless on mountain tires, but not road tires. That being said, unless you are doing the really rough stuff, mountain tire flats are pretty rare.

    From the article:

    What are the advantages of road tubeless?
    There arenít any real advantages. Tubeless tires donít pinch flat, but that has become almost a non-issue on the road as riders have moved to wider tires.


    Why are tubeless tires slower than tires with tubes?
    Tubeless-compatible tires have liquid sealant inside, which increases their resistance more than the thin membrane of a lightweight tube.
    Tubeless tires that donít require sealant have more rubber on the sidewalls to make them 100% airtight. This makes them slower than more supple tires that donít have thick, airtight sidewalls.


    Is the tire pressure different when I run tubeless vs. with tubes?
    Without a tube, the tire has a little less internal stiffness, so to get the same feel, youíll have to run slightly higher pressures. In real life, this effect is too small to make a noticeable difference. Mostly, you can run lower pressures with tubeless tires because you donít have to worry about pinch flats. Donít go overboard, though: If you bottom out too hard, you can still destroy the tire and the rim. And if you run your tires at pressures that are too low, the sidewalls will start to break down prematurely.


    "COMPLACENCY IS LETHAL - VOTE in November." - System Shock.

    "With
    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.





  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post

    *Stiffer sidewalls negate any comfort advantages of being able to run less pressure.

    As for the whole "able to run lower pressure thing"........IMO the solution to that is to just use a tire that's appropriate size and/or learn to not hit railroad tracks with all weight on the saddle.

    I can use 60 PSI on 25mm tires and not really worry about pinch flats. I'm only 145 pounds but if I put on a 100 pounds my answer would be bigger tires not tubeless. Not for everyone but should be considered as an option IMO>

    If tubeless helps avoid a lot of small shard type of flats that would be cool for someone who get a lot of those. I don't get it for avoiding pinch flats and smoothing out the ride though.


    Surprised people tend not to put the latex tube option out there too. Seems to me there are little smoother and while certainly not immune to flats including pinch flats they are more resistant.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    As for the whole "able to run lower pressure thing"........IMO the solution to that is to just use a tire that's appropriate size and/or learn to not hit railroad tracks with all weight on the saddle.
    Bingo!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Surprised people tend not to put the latex tube option out there too. Seems to me there are little smoother and while certainly not immune to flats including pinch flats they are more resistant.
    Are latex tubes really more puncture resistant? I thought just the opposite.
    "COMPLACENCY IS LETHAL - VOTE in November." - System Shock.

    "With
    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.





  18. #18
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    As for the whole "able to run lower pressure thing"........IMO the solution to that is to just use a tire that's appropriate size and/or learn to not hit railroad tracks with all weight on the saddle.

    I can use 60 PSI on 25mm tires and not really worry about pinch flats. I'm only 145 pounds but if I put on a 100 pounds my answer would be bigger tires not tubeless. Not for everyone but should be considered as an option IMO>

    If tubeless helps avoid a lot of small shard type of flats that would be cool for someone who get a lot of those. I don't get it for avoiding pinch flats and smoothing out the ride though.


    Surprised people tend not to put the latex tube option out there too. Seems to me there are little smoother and while certainly not immune to flats including pinch flats they are more resistant.
    Agree 100% w/ your post.
    #promechaniclife

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post

    Are latex tubes really more puncture resistant? I thought just the opposite.
    yes, they are.

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