Your one "perfect" wheelset is????
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    545

    Your one "perfect" wheelset is????

    Let's say you could only ride one wheelset for an entire year. Training, racing, everything. It had to be durable so you didn't break the bank getting it tuned up or sent away for warranty.

    What would you get, how much would it weigh, and do you currently do this "perfect" wheelset scenario? If not, why (have you tried but it failed for whatever reason?)?

  2. #2

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    52
    I own the following wheelsets: Zipp 404 clinchers, Reynolds Stratus DV tubulars, Specialized Tri-spoke tubulars, Mavic CXP-22 clinchers, Mavic Ksyrium SLs and Velocity Spartacus clinchers.

    If I had to go with only one of these wheelsets for an entire year it would easily be the Ksyriums. They are relatively light, but most important, they are bomb-proof. They aren't the most aero wheels out there but for an everyday training wheel and race wheel they would easily be my choice.

  3. #3
    Censored by *********
    Reputation: purplepaul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,397
    Since I only have one pair of wheels for my road bike, I can say with authority that I would have Campy Neutron tubulars. I absolutely love them! They handle NYC streets so well that they aren't out of true after a good 4000 miles. They're light and, I think, beautiful. Plus, everyone else on group rides have Ksyriums (how the hell is that pronounced) and I like being different.

    Paul
    It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the most responsive to change.

    Charles Darwin

  4. #4

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    930
    Record hubs with Open Pro rims.

    32 hole rear. 14/15 double butted with alloy nipples. Laced three cross.

    28 hole front. 15/16 with alloy nipples. Three cross.

    Some people might disagree with the alloy nipples.

  5. #5
    The Edge
    Reputation: niteschaos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    205
    I'd like to have the Rolf Prima Vigors. I've seen Rolf wheels with over 10000 miles on them and the owners have plenty of good comments about them. I do just about everything on the road and excel at ITT, so I think this would be a good wheelset to go with. Right now I'm on the standard issue custom built ultegra Open Pro wheels.
    I'm a gravity missile. Clydesdales, represent!

  6. #6
    AJS
    AJS is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,915

    Thumbs up

    Of all the wheelsets I've owned or ridden, I liked my Campy Shamal tubs best. I definitely regret that I sold them. (BTW Paul, I had a pair of Nuke tubs too and they were excellent.)

    But if I had just 1 choice, I'd pick Shamal's in a nanosecond.

    The Shamal's were tough - I couldn't hurt those wheels no matter what I demanded of them and I'm a Clydesdale. Never once did they need a truing or a spoke, only normal lubing and bearing maintenance. For a 32H, 28H, 24H, 20H wheel, that's damned good reliability. For a 16/14 spoke wheelset like Shamal's, that's amazing.

    But the greatest property they had was they absolutely FLEW down the road. But the rim depth was only 38mm. instead of 50mm. like their rival's. I'm not sure if even CF aero wheels would have gone much faster. In fact, I think I saw on the Lew website test results that showed Shamal's were one of the top 3 or 4 fastest aero wheels at that time, and way-expensive wheels like the Bora's, Ghibli's, and Lew's didn't beat them by much.

    On climbs they were very good too. Yes, the Nukes and other wheels felt a bit lighter on climbs, but I didn't feel a drastic difference. To me, Shamal's just didn't seem to feel slow going uphill as many people might have thought. I loved 'em.

    Some people have said that Shamal's were a hard-riding, too-stiff wheelset. The ride honestly did not bother me, but some of that might have been offset by using tubular tires. Maybe the clincher version was harsher?

    I considered buying a set of Lew's, but I couldn't see the high-zoot and possible CF problems when the Shamal's were so good. It was a sad day when Campy decided to quit making them.
    Last edited by AJS; 04-04-2004 at 11:12 PM.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    776
    My road bike is currently wearing 32-spoke, 350 gram Specialized Saturne (Ambrosio) sew-up wheels. They hold up pretty well under my 215 lbs, but my next set of sewups will use a slightly heavier rim (foil-label GP4), 36 spokes, and Campy hubs. I don't use clinchers on my "fun" road bikes.

    The commuter's got Mavic MA-40s, 36h / x3 on Shimano 600EX hubs.

    The fixie: Alex DR-13s, 36h / x4 on Suzue track hubs.

    MTB and tandem are both 26", so they don't count.

    If I could only have one set of wheels, that I'd have to put on all of my 700C bikes, It'd have to be 36 hole MA2s, laced x4 to Phil Wood freewheel hubs (so I could use them on the fixie). One set of wheels that will take tires from 23 mm up to 40+, with my choice of 6 speed, 7 speed, single speed free, or fixed. Cassette hubs would allow 8 speed (I don't do 9 or 10), but looses the fixed option.

    I don't race, I don't train, I just like to ride my bike.

    --Shannon

  8. #8
    AJS
    AJS is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,915
    I don't race, I don't train, I just like to ride my bike.
    !

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    10,160

    Ksyrium....

    For me, they've been very reliable, trouble free wheels. The bearings are incredibly smooth and the freehub is not noisy. They can be pricey, but I've always found them for $150-200 below retail.

  10. #10

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    9
    Open Pro on Record 36H

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: boneman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    2,655

    What I own and ride

    I've got wheel sets going back to the 70's but also have Ksyrium's and Neutrons so there's a bit of the modern day representation as well.

    Until moving to London, I only rode tubulars but due to the outstanding amount of glass on London Streets, a by product of non-mandatory recycling and heavy drinking, I switched to clinchers 4 years ago and hence this recommendation is for clinchers.

    Rims- Ambrosio Excellights, 28 front and 32 rear (I've read good things about the new DT rims but have not experience using them)

    Spokes- Sapim CX-Rays, 3x front and back (Sapim Lasers are cheaper and weight about the same but don't look as cool)

    Hubs- Campag Record or Shimano DA, depending on your set up.

    The requirement for these wheels is a good wheel builder. My truing stand got lost in my last move and buying another would just take up space and time which I don't have. My favorite wheelbuilder in the UK is Paul Hewitt in Lancashire.

    If you can't find or don't know of a good, and I mean good, wheelbuilder, I would go with Campag Neutrons. I have the Kysrium SL's (and originals) but prefer the Neutrons. Hard to tell you why on a quantitative basis but they feel like a much livelier wheel to ride.

    Bad news about the Campag vs. Mavic prebuilts, at least in the UK, is that if you damage the rim or break some spokes, the Mavic replacements are cheaper and slightly more readily available than the Campag.

  12. #12

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    251

    Hmmm

    36rear, 32front. Open pro+ Dura Ace (Ultegra if I'm the one paying) DT Revolution 2.0-1.5-2.0 spokes. Alloy nipples on the front and rear non-drive side. Tied and solderd.

    I'm sure I'd be happy with them after a year or more.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: biknben's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,939

    Still trying to find them...

    In recent years I've had DA/OPs, Am-Classic 350s and Zipp 303s in my stable. My favorite wheels were Zipps. Unfortunately, with 2 years of continuous use, they started giving me problems.

    They Am-classics have been alright but they have the misfortune of following the Zipps. Just not aero enough, IMO. I don't like the braking surface (too thin not machined as well as others). I just toasted the front rim in a crash and am having it rebuilt with a Velocity Deep V rim.

    The Dura-Ace/Open Pro wheels have been around the entire time. Now they handle all my races. Although I did pull a spoke out of the rim, I've found them to be very reliable overall.

    If forced to just get one wheelset, I'd be looking for OPs on Chris King hubs. 28h Fr, 32 Rr both 3-cross. That's got to be the ultimate in longevity. Low/easy maint., tried and true products, without excessive weight.

    Just my $.02
    Pain is weakness leaving the body!!!
    Work to Eat / Eat to Live / Live to Ride / Ride to Work

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    545
    Quote Originally Posted by biknben

    If forced to just get one wheelset, I'd be looking for OPs on Chris King hubs. 28h Fr, 32 Rr both 3-cross. That's got to be the ultimate in longevity. Low/easy maint., tried and true products, without excessive weight.

    Just my $.02
    I've heard many in the pack find riding next to a King (and Hugi) road hub incredibly annoying.

  15. #15
    Just one more switchback
    Reputation: mtpisgah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    237

    Bontrager X lite aero

    I love them. They are so much stiffer than my Heliums and Ultegra/Open Pros were. They are a little heavier than I would like but the stiffness makes it worth it.

  16. #16
    member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    497

    I like my Shamals too

    But, if I had to pick one set for everything, it'd be open pros or velocity arrowheads (sp?) with Dura Ace or Record/Chorus/Centaur hubs built by a good wheelbuilder or Colorado Cyclist. 32 spokes both wheels with 14/15 db spokes drive side and revolutions everywhere else. Alloy nips, brass drive side only. Definitely wouldn't use Ultegra hubs. Centaur hubs are pretty much the same as record (slightly heavier freehub body) at much less money. I race at 173lbs and my open pros have held up through some nasty crits and 3 years of riding. You'll get lots of opinions, but I think tires can make it seem like you have a brand new bike. Use wide and cheap tires while training/winter, Veloflex paves w/ latex tubes during race season, and something a little longer-lived but still lively for your long summer rides and the occassional race like Conti GP3000's or Michelin Pro Races.

    I also love my Shamals but don't think they are as good an all-around wheel. Extremely strong rims and suprisingly stiff given the low spoke count. Their biggest attribute is their speed on breakaways or long rides. They are very fast and don't catch crosswinds like other aero wheels. They are noticeably harder to accelerate than my open pros but not nearly as bad as I expected them to be when I first hefted them. Mine are sew-ups but I can see how people say they are harsh. They were a bit rough even with Vittoria Corsas until I switched to Veloflex Criteriums and got the floaty-but-connected feedback that all the old-timers rave about. The vittorias and veloflexes looked almost the same to me and I was skeptical about the claimed differences until I used both, but I assure you, it's noticable and you get what you pay for. That said, good tubulars are expensive and a pain to repair so not my first choice as an all around wheel, especially if you live in glassy areas like someone else mentioned. Also, a clincher version of the Shamals is going to be at least 100 grams heavier at the outer edge of the wheel and probably harsher riding, even with good clinchers. Not sure I'd like that as an all-around wheel.

    I also bought a pair of barely-used Campy protons (available in clincher only) last year and like them. They are very similar to the neutrons/nucleons but with lower grade hubs and visible nipples. The rear is about the same weight as my open pro but definitely stiffer laterally and subjectively-better power transfer. It also seems to be plenty durable. The front is lighter than my open pro, roughly the same stiffness laterally, but a little too fragile for me. My 140 lb teammate doesn't have to true his front nucleon though. They are a bit smoother and cooler-looking than my open pros but I think most of the performance differences mental. If you're light and get a good deal on protons or neutrons, I'd say "great," but open pros are generally hard to beat for the money. They are also easier to repair.

    Quote Originally Posted by AJS
    Of all the wheelsets I've owned or ridden, I liked my Campy Shamal tubs best. I definitely regret that I sold them. (BTW Paul, I had a pair of Nuke tubs too and they were excellent.)

    But if I had just 1 choice, I'd pick Shamal's in a nanosecond.

    The Shamal's were tough - I couldn't hurt those wheels no matter what I demanded of them and I'm a Clydesdale. Never once did they need a truing or a spoke, only normal lubing and bearing maintenance. For a 32H, 28H, 24H, 20H wheel, that's damned good reliability. For a 16/14 spoke wheelset like Shamal's, that's amazing.

    But the greatest property they had was they absolutely FLEW down the road. But the rim depth was only 38mm. instead of 50mm. like their rival's. I'm not sure if even CF aero wheels would have gone much faster. In fact, I think I saw on the Lew website test results that showed Shamal's were one of the top 3 or 4 fastest aero wheels at that time, and way-expensive wheels like the Bora's, Ghibli's, and Lew's didn't beat them by much.

    On climbs they were very good too. Yes, the Nukes and other wheels felt a bit lighter on climbs, but I didn't feel a drastic difference. To me, Shamal's just didn't seem to feel slow going uphill as many people might have thought. I loved 'em.

    Some people have said that Shamal's were a hard-riding, too-stiff wheelset. The ride honestly did not bother me, but some of that might have been offset by using tubular tires. Maybe the clincher version was harsher?

    I considered buying a set of Lew's, but I couldn't see the high-zoot and possible CF problems when the Shamal's were so good. It was a sad day when Campy decided to quit making them.

  17. #17

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    105
    I ride Dura Ace - both 9 and 10v, but the one thing I really miss about Campy is the Nucleon/Neutrons. I know what people mean when they compare Ksyriums and Nukes. K's just feel a bit dead in comparison.

    Also second whoever was talking about Rolf Prima Vigors. They are lighter than Ksyriums, more aero and stiffer. Shame I had to sell mine to fund my C50 purchase...

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    545
    [QUOTE=Ce Cinquanta]I ride Dura Ace - both 9 and 10v, but the one thing I really miss about Campy is the Nucleon/Neutrons. I know what people mean when they compare Ksyriums and Nukes. K's just feel a bit dead in comparison.

    QUOTE]
    Did the Nucleons turn into the Neutrons, or the other way around? Was it worth it over, say, the Proton?

  19. #19
    Censored by *********
    Reputation: purplepaul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,397
    The Nucleons became the Neutrons. The Protons are fine but they're clinchers.
    It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the most responsive to change.

    Charles Darwin

  20. #20

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Posts
    3,567

    Ksyrium clinchers

    Right now I have Ksyriums, Nucleons, several Open Pros/Record, Zipp 303 tubular, Zipp 303 carbon/clincher, Velomax Ascent Pro carbon tubulars, and have had several others, including some junky American Classic/Aerohead lightweight clinchers built by my LBS.

    Without a doubt it would be Ksyrium clinchers for me, if you really mean you had to use them for everything. Campy Nucleons would be close, but their tire changing difficulty bugs me too much. I'm not about to ride tubulars all the time and risk being stranded after 2 flats, so that disqualifies carbon tubular wheels. The K's are rock solid, trouble free, feel decently aero to me, and light enough. They are easy to do tire changes on, even with the tighter bead tires (deep rim chanel?).

    Problem is I'm now riding exclusively fixed gear. Not only am I not aware of a fixed gear Ksyrium rear, but the rules for the event I'm preparing for specifies "plain old wheels" -- 32 spoke aluminum shallow rims.

    I've put well over 20,000 miles on Ksyriums trouble free. I'd stick with what works.

    Doug

    Quote Originally Posted by bikewriter
    Let's say you could only ride one wheelset for an entire year. Training, racing, everything. It had to be durable so you didn't break the bank getting it tuned up or sent away for warranty.

    What would you get, how much would it weigh, and do you currently do this "perfect" wheelset scenario? If not, why (have you tried but it failed for whatever reason?)?

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    22

    Protons...maybe i'm poor but protons

    here's why.
    i love Ksyriums sls, they are seriously incredigble wheels, light, responsive super stiff and durable...a ery close second to my protons..
    thing is, the ksyriums are too stiff for me at least for everyday riding...i only way about 140ish so they're harsh to me. BUT they are awesome race wheels.
    Protons are kinda light, have a nice sound, great feel and have a springyness that i love.
    I'm sure there are nicer campy wheels, but my vote goes to campy protons. cost is low, durable light and comfortable and besides, legs and lungs win races really, wheels help a little and look cool alot.

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    545
    Which year of Proton do you have?
    A local racer has some spare Protons but I know they're older cuz they have silver spokes instead of the newer black, but if I can find some info that the "older" ones (she says maybe 3 years old??) are not at a disadvantage to the newer Protons (like, say, the newer ones fixed this or that problem), then I'd snatch them up from her. Make a great backup wheel!!

  23. #23

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    36

    Mavic Ksyriums

    I have two bikes. One for training and one on which I race. They both have Ksyriums. The originals on the training bike and the SLs on the racing bike. I've put them on and forgotten about them. They are bullet proof and as a Cat 4 racer, there is nohing about them that is inhibiting my performance. People say the K spokes are expensive. My local shop charges $4 installed for a replacement that I've never needed in 4 years.

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    22

    the new ones

    ;
    Quote Originally Posted by bikewriter
    Which year of Proton do you have?
    A local racer has some spare Protons but I know they're older cuz they have silver spokes instead of the newer black, but if I can find some info that the "older" ones (she says maybe 3 years old??) are not at a disadvantage to the newer Protons (like, say, the newer ones fixed this or that problem), then I'd snatch them up from her. Make a great backup wheel!!

    I can only speak for the newer ones, but they are definately awesome wheels. i think you can get them for about $330 online somewhere. the older ones are a little different as they don;t hav eth differential rear, of which i know very little. i asked the LBS guy what a good training wheel would be and he pointed those out to me and it was like getting a new bike the next ride, i loved it. get them, ou won;t regret it. ;)

  25. #25
    FTF
    FTF is offline
    banned
    Reputation: FTF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,834
    Quote Originally Posted by bikewriter
    Let's say you could only ride one wheelset for an entire year. Training, racing, everything. It had to be durable so you didn't break the bank getting it tuned up or sent away for warranty.

    What would you get, how much would it weigh, and do you currently do this "perfect" wheelset scenario? If not, why (have you tried but it failed for whatever reason?)?
    I have a pair of tubular neutrons too, and they are the ones I would choose. Fast light durable. What more do you want?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Fixed gear wheelset
    By Bikecrazed in forum Fixed/Single Speed
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-30-2004, 08:09 AM
  2. Lightweight wheelset for daily mileage??
    By 10kman in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-30-2004, 08:27 AM
  3. Thoughts on this wheelset
    By Colin_S in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-15-2004, 03:01 PM
  4. Ultimate Crit/RR wheelset?
    By Jed Peters in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 02-25-2004, 09:46 AM
  5. bontrager race lite wheelset: advice?
    By haiku d'etat in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-05-2004, 04:42 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.